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Northeast Corridor

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NEWS
May 9, 2008 | By Richard Stowe
Home to 56.3 million people, the nation's capital, and powerful financial, media and academic institutions, the Northeast region produces 20 percent of America's GDP and 27 million jobs, but is only 2 percent of the nation's landmass. The mega-sprawlopolis is most clearly defined by the intensity of its sky glow at night, light pollution symbolic of the profligate energy consumed by short-haul flights and millions of automobiles. Amtrak owns and operates the Northeast Corridor from Washington to Boston.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
The Northeast Corridor, 456 miles of track between Washington and Boston, is the most heavily traveled section of rail in the country, carrying more than half of Amtrak's passengers. It's also the deadliest. On Jan. 4, 1987, a northbound Amtrak passenger train blasted into a Conrail train, killing 16 and injuring 175. Last week, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded after a year- long investigation that the collision was caused by the "impairment from marijuana" of the engineer and brakeman of a Conrail locomotive that went through three warning signals before pulling into the path of the Amtrak train.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amtrak officials today unveiled a vision for true high-speed service along the Northeast Corridor, with trains that could travel between Philadelphia and New York in 38 minutes. The proposed new high-speed service between Washington and Boston, with trains that could travel at 220 miles per hour, would require its own dedicated tracks and a new route north of New York away from the congested seacoast, said Amtrak president Joseph Boardman. The proposed high-speed system would cost about $117 billion and take up to 30 years to complete, according to Amtrak's proposal.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak faces a "crisis of success," unable to keep up with the growing demand for service on the Northeast Corridor, Amtrak president Joseph Boardman says. "We've used up the legacy capacity of the existing railroad while further depleting its infrastructure assets, leading us to a major coming investment crisis that, without a solution, will mean strangled growth and deteriorating service," Boardman told a Senate committee Wednesday. Amtrak, setting ridership records every year, needs about $2 billion annually for upkeep and growth on the corridor, far more than the $260 million a year it has been spending, Boardman said in calling for a long-term federal plan for funding the railroad.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A key train safety system is now active on Amtrak rails from Washington to New York. And SEPTA's Regional Rail system is not far behind in activating its own version of the technology, officials have said. Amtrak activated Positive Train Control, which can automatically slow or stop a speeding train, between Philadelphia and New York this past weekend. The system went online from Philadelphia to Washington a week ago, spokeswoman Christina Leeds said Sunday night. The system was already operational on Amtrak rails from New Haven, Conn., to Boston, she said.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
Amtrak customers who hate listening to obnoxious passengers booming into their cell phones can take heart - the railroad has expanded its "quiet car" program under which one car on Northeast Corridor trains is designated as a no-cell-phone car. The railroad announced this month that on weekdays the policy has been extended to all but three trains. The quiet cars usually will be the first coach car behind the locomotive. On weekends, no quiet cars are available. Amtrak first tried the concept in January 2000.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak wants to use operating profits from the Northeast Corridor for major construction projects on the corridor, instead of subsidizing long-distance trains elsewhere in the nation. Revenues from passenger operations on the 453-mile corridor between Washington and Boston will exceed operating costs by about $290 million next year, Amtrak president Joseph Boardman said in a letter Tuesday to congressional leaders. Boardman asked that Amtrak be allowed to use that operating surplus to help pay for $735 million in capital costs on the corridor, including new railcars, station improvements, and rail and signal upgrades.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
House leaders in Washington on Thursday introduced legislation to allow Amtrak to reinvest Northeast Corridor profits on improvements to the corridor, rather than to use that money to subsidize money-losing, long-distance routes in other parts of the country. The bill proposes many changes in how the national railroad is funded and how it operates. It was sponsored by top Republican and Democratic members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, giving it instant bipartisan support.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Amtrak's planned new Acela Express trains will carry more passengers and be more reliable than the current ones, even if they won't travel much faster, Amtrak president Joseph Boardman said Thursday. Amtrak is seeking proposals, with the California High-Speed Rail Authority, for new high-speed trains that can run at 220 miles an hour on the West Coast and 160 miles an hour on the Northeast Corridor. Proposals from train-builders are due by May 17. A builder will be selected by the end of the year, Boardman said.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak's updated plan for high-speed train travel on the East Coast envisions 37-minute trips between Philadelphia and New York, after a $151 billion redevelopment of the entire Northeast Corridor. Faster service would be phased in gradually, as Amtrak improves existing tracks, signals, bridges, and power lines and then builds a separate high-speed corridor between Washington and Boston to accommodate trains traveling at 220 m.p.h. In a report released Monday, Amtrak revised its projections for costs, ridership, and the alignment of its proposed new 438-mile high-speed corridor.
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NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
It is the sound of the station. More so than the distant rumble and roar of the trains, than the jostling and jockeying of the taxi line, than even the daily din of hurried travelers echoing through the grand hall of 30th Street Station. Even in the quiet hours it is there, signifying comings and goings: Clickety-clack, clickety-clickety-clack. For more than three decades, by far the most charming sound of 30th Street Station has been the ticker-tape whirl of the giant flip-board departures board, an anachronistic thing in a city slowly but steadily shedding its anachronistic trappings.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Julie Shaw and Erin Serpico, STAFF WRITERS
With unexpected ferocity, a potent squall line ripped through the region around lunchtime Wednesday, knocking out power to more than 80,000 utility customers, toppling trees, and causing significant transportation delays. A wind gust of 72 mph was reported in Cumberland County, N.J., said National Weather Service meteorologist Patrick O'Hara, and gusts of 50 to 65 mph were common elsewhere on both sides of the Delaware River. The winds downed trees all over the region, with 27 of them in Haverford Township, Delaware County, alone, township emergency officials said.
NEWS
May 19, 2016
Brandon Bostian was by all accounts the sort of conscientious engineer any passenger would want in the locomotive, his professionalism and lifelong love of trains evident in earnest online posts about rail safety. And yet radio chatter about a SEPTA train struck by a rock north of Philadelphia's 30th Street Station - a common hazard on the Northeast Corridor - was probably enough to distract the Amtrak engineer from the quick series of speed changes required ahead of one of the corridor's sharpest curves, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded in a report released Tuesday.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The tears were there, as usual, under a gray sky that wept along with those gathered Friday by the Delaware River for Workers' Memorial Day, to honor people killed on the job. But there was anger as well, and it boiled over at the annual breakfast that preceded a solemn march on Columbus Boulevard to a rainy memorial service at Penn's Landing. With a roar not unlike the sound of the train that mowed down two Amtrak workers on April 3, waves of railway workers rose to their feet Friday in rage and sadness in response to a call from their union leader.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin and Caitlin McCabe, STAFF WRITERS
A failure to follow one or more safety rules designed to protect rail workers likely played a role in the Amtrak crash that killed two men Sunday, sources with knowledge of the crash said. The National Transportation Safety Board has said the communication between dispatchers and the work crew on the track will be one of the factors examined in the investigation. On Tuesday, several sources said a possible focus was on the failure to properly secure the permission that work crews need to safely access tracks.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITER jlaughlin@phillynews.com 215-854-4587 @jasmlaughlin
SEPTA's capital budget for the coming fiscal year includes money for more accurate travel information, improved stations, and more than 500 new buses, all part of a long-term plan to update a system that for years went without needed upgrades. The $548.63 million capital budget for fiscal year 2017, which begins July 1, was made public Friday and is about $14 million more than FY 2016's capital budget. It is part of a $7.3 billion, 12-year capital program. SEPTA's overall budget for the coming year is about $1.4 billion.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
National Transportation Safety Board documents released Monday include transcripts of interviews with Amtrak crew members and emergency personnel who responded to the May 12, 2015, derailment of Train 188 at Frankford Junction: Akida Henry, assistant conductor for Train 188: "He [the engineer] was laying on the horn. The next thing, you see something flash and the train is shaking so violently. It's just shaking and shaking and it seemed like forever. Finally, we kind of - I don't know if we flipped or what, but we rolled and slid.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITER
The public will get an additional two weeks to comment on the long-term plans for the Northeast rail corridor that propose major changes for the route's path through Philadelphia. The comment period for the draft environmental impact statement was extended from Jan. 30 to Feb. 15 due to heavy interest from the public, Federal Railroad Administration officials said. The NEC Future long term plan offers three visions for the 457-mile corridor between Washington D.C. and Boston, and among the proposals are Amtrak service to Philadelphia International Airport and Center City.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A key train safety system is now active on Amtrak rails from Washington to New York. And SEPTA's Regional Rail system is not far behind in activating its own version of the technology, officials have said. Amtrak activated Positive Train Control, which can automatically slow or stop a speeding train, between Philadelphia and New York this past weekend. The system went online from Philadelphia to Washington a week ago, spokeswoman Christina Leeds said Sunday night. The system was already operational on Amtrak rails from New Haven, Conn., to Boston, she said.
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