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NEWS
October 18, 1998 | By David Trimble
David Trimble, leader of the Ulster Unionist Party in Northern Ireland and co-winner of this year's Nobel Prize for Peace, gave these remarks in Belfast on Sept. 3, at a ceremony attended by President Clinton. Mr. President, when you last visited us, you said to the men of violence here that their day was over, that there was no room for guns at democracy's table. There is no justification for violence. There never has been. . . . Mr. President, the path ahead is for true democrats only.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | BY JACK McKINNEY
In two more weeks the so-called marching season will be officially over in Northern Ireland, leaving damages of over a quarter-billion dollars in the roiling wake of its violence. Will anything have been learned from the experience? The British government, which rules the partitioned six-county statelet, hopes so. In a reflex typical of governments everywhere, it has named Dr. Peter North, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, to "study the problem and prepare a report.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
To those who gathered Thursday night at Holy Family College to honor him, Bishop Cahal B. Daly is a peacemaker. To the Irish National Caucus, an American group that issued a press release blasting him for his visit to this country, he is a troublemaker. Those conflicting views reflect life in civil war-torn Northern Ireland, a place where many Catholics and Protestants see right and wrong as black and white. Or perhaps green and orange. "But there is no such thing as green tears or orange tears.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | by Jim Dee, Special to the Daily News
Tension continued to boil in Northern Ireland yesterday with sporadic hijackings, gas bombings and shooting incidents in the third straight day of violence over Protestant marches. In Newry, a border city about 40 miles south of Belfast, armed masked men cleared a train of passengers before setting it on fire. It was the second train burned in three days. Al cross-border train service with the Irish Republic has been suspended. There is growing fear a second round of Protestant marches on Saturday could push events over the brink, triggering full-scale paramilitary violence.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talks on the future of Northern Ireland collapsed yesterday, ending what was once hailed as the best chance in a generation to find a political solution to the province's violent conflicts. The talks, which had nearly expired on numerous occasions in recent weeks, were put to rest by the man whose handiwork they were, Britain's Northern Ireland Secretary Peter Brooke. But the cause of the collapse appeared to be the unwillingness of Ulster's Protestant political parties to let the Republic of Ireland play any significant role in the province's political future.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | By John Cushnahan
As an 18-year-old from West Belfast, I interviewed for a job with a large insurance company. I was subsequently told by the firm's manager that, although I was the best applicant, he could not hire me because I was a Catholic. Currently, I lead the Alliance Party, the only nonsectarian political party in Northern Ireland. Its 10 percent of the popular vote is drawn equally from Catholics and Protestants. One of the party's founding principles was and remains a pledge to root out injustice and discrimination in our society.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A gang of masked men carrying axes and cudgels terrorized Roman Catholics in a pre-dawn attack in the normally peaceful village of Rasharkin in Country Antrim yesterday. The raid was one of the worst incidents in a series of street skirmishes and sectarian clashes that started Friday night, the eve of a major Protestant celebration that marks the victory of Protestant King William of Orange over Catholic King James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1609. In Rasharkin, masked vandals toting cudgels, pickax handles and axes set upon 12 homes before dawn, wrecked five cars and injured a 16-year-old youth trying to defend himself, police said.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
After graduating from Yale Law School, Thomas Patrick Foley spent two years in Northern Ireland serving as volunteer legal counsel to the Peace People, a Nobel Peace Prize-winning group dedicated to easing tensions in that war- ravaged province. In his new position as executive deputy secretary in the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, Foley, a Flourtown native, will be a key figure in trying to keep peace between workers and management in the state. Foley, who began working at his new post Monday, said he was looking forward to the challenge of carrying out Gov. Casey's Pennsylvania Partnership campaign.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The worst bombing in Northern Ireland's modern history yesterday killed at least 28 people, including an 18-month-old child, in a crowded market town 70 miles west of Belfast. Hospital officials said 220 were injured, 10 critically, in the attack at Omagh, County Tyrone, which occurred in midafternoon in the center of the mixed Catholic and Protestant town on its busiest shopping day. Police suggested that a warning call to the British Broadcasting Corp. newsroom in Belfast 40 minutes before the explosion may have been designed to lead civilians to the bombing site.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Patricia Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The speaker's voice carried the lilt of the Emerald Isle, a rhythmic flow of words that riveted the attention of the group of more than 40 men and women of all ages at the Cinnaminson Public Library. But her talk did not call to mind shades of green fields or bright-eyed, freckle-faced children. When Noelle Ryan of Belfast addressed the members of the Irish American Unity Conference South Jersey Chapter on May 13 it was about prisons and extradition and politicians. It was an update on the "troubles" in Northern Ireland.
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NEWS
July 4, 2016
Britain's vote to leave the European Union was greeted in the kingdom and its former colonies by more than a few facile comparisons to a 240-year-old revolution. "The Brexit referendum is akin to our own Declaration of Independence," former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin enthused. The leader of the far-right UK Independence Party, Nigel Farage, said the vote would "go down in history as our independence day. " Especially from a Philadelphian's perspective, such analogies, if followed to their absurd conclusion, suggest London and other major English cities had better gird for occupation.
NEWS
June 29, 2016
Elites are in trouble. High levels of immigration are destabilizing our democracies. Politicians who put their short-term political interests over their countries' needs reap the whirlwind - for themselves but, more importantly, for their nations. Citizens who live in the economically ailing peripheries of wealthy nations are in revolt against well-off and cosmopolitan metropolitan areas. Older voters lock in decisions that young voters reject. Traditional political parties on the left and right are being torn asunder.
NEWS
March 18, 2016
One winter day about 10 years back, Neill Laughlin was walking his dog past a Fishtown pub when he happened upon a curious scene: The establishment was overflowing with boisterous and visibly intoxicated individuals, each one, he said, "dressed in green and wasted at noon. " Sincerely mystified, he asked a few patrons what they were whooping up. "Don't you know? It's St. Patrick's Day!" Born and raised in Belfast, Laughlin, co-owner of Sassafras in Old City, knew full well that March 17 was still three weeks away.
FOOD
March 17, 2016
Make 4 servings 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup buttermilk 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt 1 teaspoon baking soda   1. Combine and mix dry ingredients in a bowl, then add buttermilk. Using your hands, work the mixture together in the bowl, forming a loose ball, before turning out onto a flour-dusted surface. 2. Lightly knead the dough, being careful not to overwork it, into a circular shape about half an inch thick. 3. Once dough is formed, cut an X across the circle, forming four equal-sized farls, or pieces.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH INSURANCE A sour side of the land of milk and honey I have relatives in Northern Ireland and Canada and friends from Australia. Not one of them has ever said, "We wish we had the health-care plan you have in the United States" ("Single-payer health care unworkable, too costly," Tuesday). |Desmond McCaffery, Trooper
NEWS
July 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas J. O'Donnell, 70, of Huntingdon Valley, a veteran who served in Korea and a manager at Conrail Corp. for more than 30 years, died Sunday, July 19, of pancreatic cancer at home. Born in Mount Airy, Mr. O'Donnell was a 1963 graduate of Cardinal Dougherty High School and a 1967 graduate of what is now La Salle University. He served in the Army along the Korean demilitarized zone from 1967 to 1969. Mr. O'Donnell had worked for Conrail starting in 1963 and interrupted his career to go to South Korea.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Legend has it that St. Patrick himself once turned water into wine. But transforming the Patron Saint of Ireland's holiday into something other than an occasion of mass intoxication? Even a miracle worker like St. Pat might take a pass. "Look, I like a drink. But there are crazies who go out on St. Patrick's Day and give the Irish a bad name," says Jackie Kelly of Cherry Hill. Kelly, her husband, John, and other organizers of Philadelphia's first-ever "Sober St. Patrick's Day" say it will offer families, folks in recovery, and fans of traditional Irish music and dance a chance to celebrate in a booze-free milieu.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neither Joseph E. Montgomery nor his parents were born in Ireland, but that did not lessen his obvious devotion to his Irish American heritage. "He just enjoyed Irish culture," son Patrick said. Mr. Montgomery, 95, of Merchantville, was president from 1958 to 1998 of Division 65 of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the national Irish Catholic fraternal organization. The division, with members across the Philadelphia region, was named after Mr. Montgomery in 1998, its 100th anniversary year.
SPORTS
July 16, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
IN ENGLAND, only two courses are older than Royal Liverpool. Or Hoylake, as it's better known for the seaside town that surrounds it. The club as founded in 1869 and 28 years later hosted the first of what this week will be a dozen Open Championships, as they simply call it everywhere outside the United States. In the modern rotation, only St. Andrews (28), Muirfield (16) and Royal Troon (14) have been the venue more often. It was taken out of the rotation after 1967 not because of the course but rather the notion that it could no longer cope with the logistical issues, such as parking and concession space.
NEWS
March 18, 2014
D ONAL McCOY, 47, of Southwark, has owned the Old City restaurant Serrano and the music venue upstairs, Tin Angel, since 2005. The native of Belfast, Northern Ireland, a former bartender, curates the liquor collection for both businesses. He also co-owns, with Neil Laughlin, the nearby bar Sassafras. Q: Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom. Do you feel Irish? A: Northern Ireland is part of the island of Ireland. I can speak the Irish language and was educated by Christian Brothers, so, yes, I'm very Irish.
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