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NEWS
October 13, 2009
RE SOLOMON JONES' column on Barack Obama's peace prize: For Alfred Nobel, this prize was dedicated to the person who's done the best work for fraternity between nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies and the holding and promotion of peace congresses. Is there a better definition of Obama's work since he was elected? It's a myth that the prize is awarded to recognize efforts for peace and human rights only after they have proven successful. It is often awarded to help good behavior.
NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And then there's the American president Europeans just adore. Former President Jimmy Carter accepted his 2002 Nobel Peace Prize here yesterday in the bright aquamarine auditorium of Oslo's imposing City Hall. He took the high-profile opportunity offered by the Norwegian Nobel Committee to draw sharp contrasts between his own conciliatory approach to international affairs and the drums-of-war strategy of the Bush administration. In what appeared a direct response to White House statements that the United States might have to forcibly disarm Iraq "for the sake of peace," Carter quoted Ralph Bunche, the American who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950: "To suggest that war can prevent war is a base play on words and a despicable form of war-mongering.
NEWS
October 13, 2002
A man of principle. Few labels are considered more admirable. It is a label that the Georgia peanut farmer who became a president has earned through long toil. Now, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has celebrated Jimmy Carter's lifetime of acting on his principles by awarding him the Nobel Peace Prize. The last time a current or former U.S. official won the peace prize was 1973, when Henry Kissinger and Le Duc Tho shared it for negotiating an end to the war in Vietnam. Mr. Carter, as president and ex-president, has tried to negotiate to keep conflicts from beginning.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
On Friday, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced it had awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Peace to Kim Dae Jung, president of South Korea, "for his work for democracy and human rights in South Korea and in East Asia in general, and for peace and reconciliation with North Korea in particular. " But we in Philadelphia already knew President Kim was great. He was awarded the city's Liberty Medal in 1999. And right now, do we ever need thoughts of peace. Middle East turmoil and the murderous bombing of the USS Cole remind us that it takes just one scream to shatter the calm.
NEWS
October 12, 2009
WHEN I learned that President Obama had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, I thought immediately of members of the Bush administration and what they must have thought, knowing such an honor would never have been bestowed on them. The Nobel committee noted Mr. Obama's "extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples," and it is absolutely right. The moment Barack Obama set foot in the White House, the tenor of international relations changed.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez, leader of a country without an army and the architect of a peace plan for strife-torn Central America, yesterday was awarded the 1987 Nobel Peace Prize. The former Harvard premedical student won the award, worth a record $340,000, over nominees that included Philippines President Corazon C. Aquino and Argentine President Raul Alfonsin. The Norwegian Nobel Committee's selection was a surprise because it was based on achievements after the Feb. 1 deadline for nominations.
NEWS
October 13, 2001 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United Nations and its secretary-general, Kofi Annan, were awarded the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize yesterday for their "efforts to achieve peace and security in the world" since the Cold War. The Norwegian Nobel Committee said its choice of winners was "underpinned" by the Sept. 11 attacks and the retaliation by the United States, which has mounted its diplomatic and military response with only a marginal role for the United Nations so far. Committee leader Gunnar Berge told reporters in Oslo that the United Nations might have won even if there had been no Sept.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The saint of Calcutta's gutters provided, with her own hands, the poorest of the poor a clean, loving place to die, a simple, but fundamental, act of compassion that won for her - over many a statesman - the Nobel Peace Prize. "I feel unworthy," Mother Teresa said in 1979 when told of the accolade. But the diminutive Catholic nun, 69 years old at the time, accepted the prize "in the name of the hungry, of the naked, of the homeless, of the blind, of the lepers, of all those who feel unwanted, unloved, uncared for throughout society.
NEWS
October 17, 1986 | By Stanley Newman
Strictly speaking, the Norwegian Nobel Committee bent the rules when it awarded the 1986 Peace Prize to the writer and human rights activist, Elie Wiesel. To be sure, the committee that bestowed this high honor upon one of the Auschwitz death camp's most widely respected graduates acted within practices that have existed for a number of years. Most recently, South Africa's Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Poland's Lech Walesa, and the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came by their respective Peace Prize awards in recognition of their particular contributions to the ongoing struggles for human rights.
NEWS
April 25, 2011
AS A CITIZEN, a taxpayer and a parent, I simultaneously was sickened and angered reading of the death of Pfc. John F. Kihm, of Northeast Philly. The former Cardinal Dougherty High School honor student and athlete just killed in Afghanistan was 19. He's the 86th soldier from the region to die in America's "operations" to bring "freedom" to Iraq and "enduring freedom" to or from Afghanistan. The U.S. death count since all this freedom-finding began approaches 6,000. The money count approaches insanity.
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NEWS
April 25, 2011
AS A CITIZEN, a taxpayer and a parent, I simultaneously was sickened and angered reading of the death of Pfc. John F. Kihm, of Northeast Philly. The former Cardinal Dougherty High School honor student and athlete just killed in Afghanistan was 19. He's the 86th soldier from the region to die in America's "operations" to bring "freedom" to Iraq and "enduring freedom" to or from Afghanistan. The U.S. death count since all this freedom-finding began approaches 6,000. The money count approaches insanity.
NEWS
October 13, 2009
RE SOLOMON JONES' column on Barack Obama's peace prize: For Alfred Nobel, this prize was dedicated to the person who's done the best work for fraternity between nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies and the holding and promotion of peace congresses. Is there a better definition of Obama's work since he was elected? It's a myth that the prize is awarded to recognize efforts for peace and human rights only after they have proven successful. It is often awarded to help good behavior.
NEWS
October 12, 2009
WHEN I learned that President Obama had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, I thought immediately of members of the Bush administration and what they must have thought, knowing such an honor would never have been bestowed on them. The Nobel committee noted Mr. Obama's "extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples," and it is absolutely right. The moment Barack Obama set foot in the White House, the tenor of international relations changed.
NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And then there's the American president Europeans just adore. Former President Jimmy Carter accepted his 2002 Nobel Peace Prize here yesterday in the bright aquamarine auditorium of Oslo's imposing City Hall. He took the high-profile opportunity offered by the Norwegian Nobel Committee to draw sharp contrasts between his own conciliatory approach to international affairs and the drums-of-war strategy of the Bush administration. In what appeared a direct response to White House statements that the United States might have to forcibly disarm Iraq "for the sake of peace," Carter quoted Ralph Bunche, the American who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950: "To suggest that war can prevent war is a base play on words and a despicable form of war-mongering.
NEWS
October 13, 2002
A man of principle. Few labels are considered more admirable. It is a label that the Georgia peanut farmer who became a president has earned through long toil. Now, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has celebrated Jimmy Carter's lifetime of acting on his principles by awarding him the Nobel Peace Prize. The last time a current or former U.S. official won the peace prize was 1973, when Henry Kissinger and Le Duc Tho shared it for negotiating an end to the war in Vietnam. Mr. Carter, as president and ex-president, has tried to negotiate to keep conflicts from beginning.
NEWS
October 13, 2001 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United Nations and its secretary-general, Kofi Annan, were awarded the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize yesterday for their "efforts to achieve peace and security in the world" since the Cold War. The Norwegian Nobel Committee said its choice of winners was "underpinned" by the Sept. 11 attacks and the retaliation by the United States, which has mounted its diplomatic and military response with only a marginal role for the United Nations so far. Committee leader Gunnar Berge told reporters in Oslo that the United Nations might have won even if there had been no Sept.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
On Friday, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced it had awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Peace to Kim Dae Jung, president of South Korea, "for his work for democracy and human rights in South Korea and in East Asia in general, and for peace and reconciliation with North Korea in particular. " But we in Philadelphia already knew President Kim was great. He was awarded the city's Liberty Medal in 1999. And right now, do we ever need thoughts of peace. Middle East turmoil and the murderous bombing of the USS Cole remind us that it takes just one scream to shatter the calm.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The saint of Calcutta's gutters provided, with her own hands, the poorest of the poor a clean, loving place to die, a simple, but fundamental, act of compassion that won for her - over many a statesman - the Nobel Peace Prize. "I feel unworthy," Mother Teresa said in 1979 when told of the accolade. But the diminutive Catholic nun, 69 years old at the time, accepted the prize "in the name of the hungry, of the naked, of the homeless, of the blind, of the lepers, of all those who feel unwanted, unloved, uncared for throughout society.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | By Rick Lyman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nelson Mandela, who will almost certainly be South Africa's first black president, and F.W. de Klerk, who may well be the country's last white president, yesterday were awarded the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize. "By looking ahead to South African reconciliation instead of back at the deep wounds of the past, they have shown personal integrity and great political courage," the Norwegian Nobel Committee said in its award citation in Oslo. The committee praised the two men's "constructive policy of peace and reconciliation" and said it showed how similar ethnic conflicts around the world might also be overcome.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez, leader of a country without an army and the architect of a peace plan for strife-torn Central America, yesterday was awarded the 1987 Nobel Peace Prize. The former Harvard premedical student won the award, worth a record $340,000, over nominees that included Philippines President Corazon C. Aquino and Argentine President Raul Alfonsin. The Norwegian Nobel Committee's selection was a surprise because it was based on achievements after the Feb. 1 deadline for nominations.
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