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NEWS
October 19, 2012
TRENTON - The Assembly approved a bill Thursday that would require out-of-state law enforcement agencies to notify New Jersey officials before conducting counterterrorism surveillance in the state. The measure was introduced in response to revelations of spying on Muslims in the state by the New York Police Department. Assemblyman Charles Mainor (D., Hudson), who is also a Jersey City police officer, said New York police targeted many innocent Muslims. New York police denied wrongdoing and the New Jersey attorney general found they broke no state law. Mainor's legislation would allow prosecutors to get an injunction to block an agency from conducting surveillance if it hadn't complied with the notification requirement.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | By Shawna McCoy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A bill that would make municipalities responsible for notifying certain residents by mail of proposed zoning changes was passed by the state Assembly yesterday. The bill now goes to Gov. Whitman for her signature. A spokeswoman for the governor said there was no word yet whether she would sign it. The bill was approved by the Senate on Monday. The original bill, sponsored by Assemblyman George S. Geist (R., Camden), required that municipalities notify residents who live within 200 feet of a proposed zoning change of a rezoning hearing by certified letter.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
If it had been a footrace, the abortion proposal never would have made it out of the starting blocks. The Assembly committee yesterday had barely begun considering a bill to require that parents be notified before their daughters are allowed to have abortions when four of the five members said they would vote against it. "I cannot vote in favor of this, I'll tell you that right now. The notification should come when the teenager is about...
NEWS
September 28, 1999 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The New Jersey Supreme Court said yesterday that the state's new law requiring parents to be notified when a pregnant minor seeks an abortion involves "substantial constitutional issues" and kept it on hold pending a full hearing. The unanimous ruling by the seven-member court ended a flurry of last-minute motions in recent days over the law, which had been set to take effect Sunday. It would have applied to thousands of minors seeking an abortion in the state, including an unknown number crossing from Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | By Chris Conway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Nick Wishart contributed to this article
New Jersey prosecutors will resume the controversial notifications called for by Megan's Law to alert community groups and neighbors to the presence of convicted sex offenders who authorities believe may strike again. Responding to concerns raised by the New Jersey Supreme Court, Attorney General Deborah Poritz issued guidelines yesterday that are supposed to provide prosecutors with objective standards for classifying sex offenders according to the risk they pose. Those classifications will determine the scope of any public notification.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This time around, it was school administrators sitting behind the narrow desks waiting for the lecture to begin. But once the class began, there was no passing of notes among the 30 principals from school districts throughout Camden County who gathered yesterday afternoon at the Camden County Police Academy. There was no whispering, no private jokes, no snoozing. In fact, for the two hours that Camden County Assistant Prosecutor Gladys Rodriguez lectured on the nuances of Megan's Law and how it applies to schools, there was silence in the classroom.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The most controversial aspect of Megan's Law - the notification of communities about the sex offenders living among them - was hung up again yesterday on a constitutional issue that won't go away. U.S. District Judge John Bissell maintained his previous position that there is a "reasonable likelihood" that it is punitive and, therefore, unconstitutional to reveal the nature of past criminal activity to an individual's work or community. Saying the effects of notification could cause "irreparable harm," Bissell decided to extend the temporary ban on notifications until at least June 17, when the matter is scheduled to return to his courtroom.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Abortion-rights groups are hedging their bets in response to New Jersey's new law requiring parental notification of abortions, planning both a court challenge and a public education campaign for thousands of girls whom it would affect, activists said yesterday. Gov. Whitman signed the law yesterday, making New Jersey the latest state among dozens to require doctors to notify at least one parent or guardian of any girl younger than 18 - whether from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware or anywhere else - who seeks an abortion in the state.
NEWS
November 26, 1998 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In what appeared to be an unprecedented use of Megan's Law in New Jersey, Ocean County authorities this week used a sex-offender notification form to tell Jackson Township residents that a convicted murderer - not a sex offender - had moved into their neighborhood. The notification flyer, including a description of the man, his address and photo, was distributed to about 700 neighbors and school officials by Jackson Township police, Capt. Mike Murray, chief of the Megan's Law unit in the Ocean County Prosecutor's Office, said yesterday.
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In July 2006, a storm cut off power to parts of Lower Providence Township for five days. Police went door to door, telling residents how to cope. A month later, officials got word that dynamite was buried in a local backyard. Officers knocked on doors, telling some neighbors to evacuate, others to stay. Should trouble strike again, don't expect a knock at the door, Township Manager Joseph Dunbar says. Instead, look for a new emergency notification system to call. "Hello, this is an important message from Lower Providence Township," a recording says.
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NEWS
January 1, 2016
The Camden County Office of Emergency Management has installed a new emergency notification system, or reverse 911 system, to provide residents with updates on weather and other alerts. An app for the web-based system, Swift911, can be downloaded on smartphones. "We are in the age of technology, where nearly everyone can be reached instantaneously through their cellphones," Freeholder Jonathan Young said. "This system is a great way for us to reach out, in whatever way is most convenient, to provide you and your family with the vital information you need during times of crisis.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Railroad Administration on Wednesday reminded railroads transporting crude oil that they must notify state emergency response commissions of the expected movement of trains hauling Bakken crude oil through individual states. In May, the Obama administration had said it would let a 2014 notification rule lapse as part of new regulations on oil trains. Following a backlash from communities, states, and some in Congress, the administration said it would leave the notification rule in place.
NEWS
September 14, 2013
A story Wednesday wrongly described a notification sent to a Philadelphia Traffic Court judge. Christine Solomon was told she would be suspended without pay for three months.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Nominee grilled on Benghazi WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice for assistant secretary of state for Europe defended her role in the talking points created after last year's deadly attack in Benghazi, Libya, at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation hearing Thursday. Victoria Nuland refused to blame former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, for whom she served as spokeswoman when Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the attack on a U.S. diplomatic mission last Sept.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
A 32-year-old man was shot and killed at 9:19 p.m. Thursday in the 500 block of Cornwall Street in North Philadelphia, police said. No arrests were reported. Police did not release any further information, pending the notification of the victim's family. - Jennifer Lin
NEWS
October 19, 2012
TRENTON - The Assembly approved a bill Thursday that would require out-of-state law enforcement agencies to notify New Jersey officials before conducting counterterrorism surveillance in the state. The measure was introduced in response to revelations of spying on Muslims in the state by the New York Police Department. Assemblyman Charles Mainor (D., Hudson), who is also a Jersey City police officer, said New York police targeted many innocent Muslims. New York police denied wrongdoing and the New Jersey attorney general found they broke no state law. Mainor's legislation would allow prosecutors to get an injunction to block an agency from conducting surveillance if it hadn't complied with the notification requirement.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan's prime minister told a Supreme Court panel Tuesday that his government would no longer stand in the way of a revival of a long-standing graft case in Switzerland against President Asif Ali Zardari, a decision that could help tamp down tensions in the bitterly contentious relationship between Zardari's government and the country's judiciary. The decision represents a significant turnaround in strategy for Zardari's ruling Pakistan People's Party, which for nearly three years has resisted the high court's demand to rescind a 2008 notification from the Pakistani government to Swiss authorities that corruption proceedings against Zardari in that country be dropped.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two people were fatally shot overnight in Philadelphia, police said Sunday.Around 12:53 a.m., a 20-year-old man was shot while sitting on steps outside a residence in the 4800 block of North Franklin Street in the city's Olney section, police said. A witness told police the shooter walked up to the victim and fired two shots, hitting him once in the abdomen. The victim was pronounced dead at 1:25 a.m. at Albert Einstein Medical Center. His identity was not released pending notification of family.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
Two people were fatally shot overnight in Philadelphia, police said Sunday. Around 12:53 a.m. Sunday, a 20-year-old man was shot while sitting on steps outside a residence in the 4800 block of North Franklin Street in the Olney section, police said. A witness told police the shooter walked up to the victim and fired two shots, hitting him once in the abdomen. The victim was pronounced dead at 1:25 a.m. at Albert Einstein Medical Center. His identity was not released pending notification of family.
SPORTS
February 29, 2012 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer
WOULD TEMPLE decline a chance to join the Big East? It wouldn't seem likely. But the university still has to do its due diligence. So today, as was first reported by CSNPhilly.com, Temple's Board of Trustees will hold a conference call to discuss the situation, although no Big East sources would confirm that an official invite has been extended. It's no secret that Temple finally looks like the only viable fit for the conference, which is left with just seven football members for the upcoming season after the recent loss of West Virginia to the Big 12. The Owls, who were football-only members of the Big East from 1991 until being asked to leave 13 years later, have been playing football in the MAC since 2007.
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