FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
FRANK RIZZO used to say, "Never write a letter, and never throw one away. " He was not a man of the voice mail or e-mail era, but the Rizzo Rule is still good. It was violated big-time last week when a twentysomething woman left this message at the office of a conservative Web site: "Hi, my name is Rachel, and my telephone number is ----. I wanted to tell you that you're evil, horrible people. You're awful people. You represent horrible ideas. God hates you and he wants to kill your children.
NEWS
April 13, 2006 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra is returning to national radio in a deal with National Public Radio, the orchestra announced yesterday, restoring a part of its profile beyond its own backyard. Performances will not be live; they will be culled from concerts during the course of this season in Verizon Hall, airing in two formats on two NPR radio shows, SymphonyCast and Performance Today. The orchestra's first appearance on Performance Today will be tonight in some markets and on WHYY's high-definition-radio service and Web site.
NEWS
October 26, 2010
ISHOULD have been gleeful when NPR fired Juan Williams. He not only insulted me personally by taking a verbal swipe at the cultural attire worn by Muslims when he admitted that he "gets nervous and worried" when he's "on a plane with people who are wearing Islamic garb," but he also offended millions of other Muslims like me who pray five times daily to Allah. Shame on him for stoking the flames of fear that continue to spread throughout the Western world against Muslims who aren't responsible for the horrendous acts of terrorism committed by a few fanatics.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
THE HOUSE of Representatives voted yesterday to end federal funding to National Public Radio. Republican supporters said it made good fiscal sense. Democratic opponents called it an ideological attack that would deprive local stations, especially rural ones, of access to programs such as "Car Talk," "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition. " The bill passed along mostly partisan lines. The prospects of support in the Senate are slim, so this may be a lot of yammering about nothing.
NEWS
October 22, 2010 | Inquirer Staff
National Public Radio fired senior news analyst Juan Williams yesterday. The sacking followed comments by Williams on Bill O'Reilly 's show on Fox News (Williams is a frequent contributor on Fox). He told O'Reilly, "When I get on a plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they're identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried. I get nervous. " Commenting on convicted Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad , Williams also said, "He said the war with Muslims, America's war is just beginning, first drop of blood.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Paul Farhi, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - NPR's gleaming new headquarters building in the shadow of the Capitol in Washington has soaring ceilings, a 24-hour "wellness" center, an employee gym, and a gourmet cafe staffed by a resident chef. This, as it turns out, could be a political problem. Open since April, NPR showed off the 400,000-square-foot complex to members of the media last week. It immediately began drawing some grumbles from those who see the edifice as far too luxe for a nonprofit radio and digital-news organization that depends, in part, on taxpayer support.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - NPR president and CEO Vivian Schiller has resigned in the wake of comments by a fellow executive that angered conservatives and renewed calls to end federal funding for public broadcasting. The chairman of NPR's board of directors announced Wednesday morning that he has accepted Schiller's resignation, effective immediately. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik said in a tweet that Schiller was forced out by the board. A hidden-camera video of an NPR executive calling the tea party racist and saying the network would be better off without federal money has led to that executive's immediate resignation.
NEWS
October 22, 2010
WHEN I first met him, Juan Williams was maybe 19 or 20, a student at Haverford College and an intern at the old Philadelphia Bulletin. At a glance, he was indistinguishable from a lot of college kids. He was studious, articulate and seemed to fit in at the small, elite suburban campus. But he was cut from a different cloth. He grew up in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant section, went to Haverford on a scholarship. His parents were hardworking, blue-collar workers from Panama.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S ALWAYS troublesome when someone who gets paid for speaking his mind gets fired for speaking his mind, so it's especially troublesome that NPR chose to fire longtime commentator Juan Williams . Yes, Williams' comment that he gets nervous every time he sees a Muslim on a plane was bigoted - and the fact that millions of Americans may agree with him doesn't make it less so - but NPR has chosen to employ him for 10 years because it seemingly valued...
NEWS
November 30, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
National Public Radio, which already lost veteran newsman Bob Edwards to satellite radio, is going to lose Los Angeles-based newsmagazine host Tavis Smiley, too. In an e-mail sent yesterday to undisclosed recipients and posted on Jim Romenesko's media page on the Poynter Institute Web site (http://poynter.org), Smiley says he won't renew his contract with NPR, making the Dec. 16 edition of The Tavis Smiley Show his last. His show is on 9 p.m. Mondays through Fridays on WHYY-FM (90.9)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2016
Becoming Wise An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living By Krista Tippett Penguin. 288 pp. $28. Reviewed by Gail Rosenblum Most of us can only dream of the dinner parties Krista Tippett could put together. We're lucky, then, that her new book is the next best thing to an invitation to sit down, make ourselves at home, and prepare for a mind-expanding exploration of what it means to be human. With Becoming Wise: An Inquiry Into the Mystery and Art of Living , Tippett expands on interviews that became fascinating fodder for On Being , her award-winning NPR program and podcast.
NEWS
April 4, 2016
Life Reimagined The Science, Art, and Opportunity of Midlife By Barbara Bradley Hagerty Riverhead. 464 pp. $28 Reviewed by Aubrey Whelan Fifty-one years after a Canadian psychologist came up with the idea of a "midlife crisis," the term that launched a thousand red sports cars has passed from cultural phenomenon to collective inside joke. And, as Barbara Bradley Hagerty writes in her exhaustively researched Life Reimagined: The Science, Art, and Opportunity of Midlife , what we think of as a classic "midlife crisis" - the great existential anguish that sets in around age 45 and doesn't let up until its subject has divorced the spouse, quit the job, and bought the sports car - affects much narrower swaths of the public than previously imagined.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
When the applause died down after H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest announced that he had donated The Inquirer and its sister publications to a new nonprofit institute, several journalists in the room asked the same hard question: How could the news organization avoid potential conflicts of interest if it was taking money from outside donors? "What we do cannot be bought," responded publisher Terrance C.Z. Egger, asserting to Philadelphia Media Network employees who gathered Tuesday that the company and its newsrooms would remain autonomous.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
More than 40 years after the fact, Mike Merritt remembers his earliest experiences seeing his father, bassist Jymie Merritt, playing on New York stages alongside jazz legends like Lee Morgan and Max Roach. "I wasn't a musician yet, and I didn't really understand jazz at all. I just knew I had a father that played it," Mike Merritt said by phone from Los Angeles. "But the intensity that came off the stage drew me in. It was obvious how much the musicians he was playing with and other musicians watching respected and loved his playing.
SPORTS
July 13, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
On Thursday morning in the pouring rain, Peter Sagal set out to run the streets of Philadelphia with 19 people in tow. Sagal, who is host of NPR's Wait Wait . . . Don't Tell Me , was in town to do a show at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts that night. But that morning, he went to the WHYY studios to get in a run, a city tour, and help fund-raise a little bit, too. "It's totally selfish of me because people want me to come out and hang with the donors," said Sagal, a multi-marathoner who also writes a column for Runner's World magazine.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Congress often hovering and threatening to withdraw the network's funding, the president's slot at NPR has been a hot seat in recent years, concedes current jobholder Jarl Mohn. But with his smart ideas and right attitude, and lots of money in the bank, this Bucks County native, now 63, isn't letting the stress get to him. "I'm about to celebrate my first anniversary, and have committed to a minimum of five years," Mohn said Thursday with WXPN on-air personality and conference producer Dan Reed in a one-on-one chat at the noncommercial radio broadcasters' meeting, Non-COMMvention, at WXPN/World Cafe Live.
NEWS
January 30, 2015
A Jan. 18 column mischaracterized the relationship between NPR and Mumia Abu-Jamal. NPR commissioned audio commentaries from Abu-Jamal in 1994 but did not air them.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Paul Farhi, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - NPR's gleaming new headquarters building in the shadow of the Capitol in Washington has soaring ceilings, a 24-hour "wellness" center, an employee gym, and a gourmet cafe staffed by a resident chef. This, as it turns out, could be a political problem. Open since April, NPR showed off the 400,000-square-foot complex to members of the media last week. It immediately began drawing some grumbles from those who see the edifice as far too luxe for a nonprofit radio and digital-news organization that depends, in part, on taxpayer support.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
WHYY-FM has won the Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Award for excellence in broadcast and digital journalism. WHYY shared the award with Harrisburg station WITF-FM and NPR for a jointly produced series of radio and Web reports on issues related to natural gas drilling in Pennsylvania. The awards were announced at the Columbia University School of Journalism in New York City on Wednesday morning. The announcement praised the project, "StateImpact Pennsylvania," as "an important model for reporting on local issues.
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