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Nuance

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NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
Distinctions, subtlety, nuance, inflection, all the stuff of intriguing music making was in ample supply when the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia explored Ligeti, Mozart and Mendelssohn in its concert at the Perelman Theater. Conductor Ignat Solzhenitsyn was making a point when he opened with Ligeti's Ramifications, music that demanded shadings of string intonation and attack far from the norm. The piece asked independence of each player from the others, to move through edgy clouds of sound to a bass solo, and finally to five bars in which all bows rested silently on the strings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2005 | By Diana Burgwyn FOR THE INQUIRER
There's nothing subtle about tenor Salvatore Licitra, who made his Philadelphia recital debut Wednesday at Verizon Hall. "I'm looking to be great, like Pavarotti," the singer told an adoring audience. Whether Licitra achieves that greatness remains to be seen. Certainly he has many superstar attributes. His large, even voice has a middle register that is impressively baritone-like, with ringing top notes that only occasionally sound pushed. His delivery is passionate, his diction fine, and, as for personality, the talkative tenor had the Kimmel Center audience in his pocket from the beginning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1999 | By Daniel Webster, FOR THE INQUIRER
Chamber music played on period instruments asks listeners to examine more deeply the textures and linkages of the writing. The drama, the humor and theatricality are there in low and finely graded decibel counts as the players offer nuance instead of explosiveness. In its season-opening concert Friday at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, Philomel played works for small groups of strings with recorder or flute, revealing moods from martial to poetic while pointing out the way composers adapted song to instrumental writing.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2012 | By Peter Rozovsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hebron is a flash point of tension between Palestinians and Jewish settlers, and the city's streets are rubble-strewn relics of strife and of shops closed by a straitened economy. Parts of Hebron are probably frightening places to be at night, and schoolchildren darting into the sidewalkless streets gave me palpitations. "God forbid we should hit one of these kids," I thought. "We won't make it out of here alive. " My driver for the day, an Israeli Arab named Alexander, said he couldn't leave his car alone in Hebron for fear that it would be stoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1999 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's not every cultural event at which you can debate vocal timbre with a man wearing a grass skirt and Hawaiian shirt while waiting in line to urinate in a sink. The man argued that the new Beach House on the Moon lacks the nuance of Jimmy Buffett's earlier work. But that could have been the $6 beers talking. No matter. As one might expect from someone who water-skis behind a seaplane and shows footage of it while playing "Why Don't We Get Drunk," Buffett's sold-out performance Thursday night at the Waterfront Entertainment Centre in Camden was not about nuance.
NEWS
June 27, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
Life usually doesn't just dump truth on your plate, neat and simple. It usually comes with a side of nuance, garnished with paradox. It's better to savor that, not shun it. It's better to learn to digest paradox, rather than shove most of life's feast off your plate. Or so it seems to me. But not to others. They want their truths TV-dinner style, neat, clear-cut, predictable, peas here, Salisbury steak there. Ignoring complexity, willing away nuance, reducing hard situations to either/or choices - some people seem to think that's brave, rather than cowardly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A partial list of the issues addressed on Rage Against the Machine's The Battle of Los Angeles: the exploitation of immigrant labor, the conviction of Mumia Abu-Jamal, persistent poverty despite economic boom times, and the legacy of white imperialism from Columbus' expedition to Vietnam, and Agent Orange. It's a regular hootenanny. Except for one thing: Rather than joining hands and singing in unison, the members of this L.A. foursome - whose early '90s work pioneered the rap/rock hybrid that gave the world Limp Bizkit - shout it all out. Theirs is an aggressive, hectoring activism, a nonstop assault in which nuance gets trampled in an adrenaline rush of emotion.
NEWS
November 12, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It could have been a 90-minute infomercial disguised as a rock-and-roll show. After all, Metallica has a new record to sell - the 13-song Re-Load, which hits stores on Tuesday. And yesterday afternoon in the CoreStates Center parking lot, this extraordinarily virtuosic hard-rock band faced more than 30,000 fans who hadn't paid a dime and were ready to lap up anything Metallica dished out. But rather than use its "Multimillion-Decibel March" to flog Re-Load, Metallica treated the enthusiastic audience to a throttling survey of neglected and rarely heard gems from all phases of its 15-year career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1994 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
We say of some composers that they are "ahead of their time," but Russian Anton Arensky (1861-1906) was "behind his time, which may be why we don't hear more about him," John Eaken quipped Friday night in the auditorium of the Free Library of Philadelphia. The violinist was on stage with members of the Eaken Piano Trio for a free recital, courtesy of the Musical Fund Society. Eaken described Arensky as "pure romantic," and said that, despite studies with the progressive Rimsky-Korsakov at St. Petersburg Conservatory, the composer kept harking back to simpler melodies and to his beloved muse, Tchaikovsky.
NEWS
October 3, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
Just don't know what I'm going to do with that boy. Checked in on my teenage son in his room last night. Supposed to be doing homework. Watching SportsCenter instead. He'd gotten back a paper on The Great Gatsby. Red marks and exclamations points all over it. Teacher said he had to rewrite it to get a passing grade. "OK, bud, where's the redone Gatsby paper? Let's see it. " He handed me a fresh sheet of paper with a few sentences on it. With a word or two changed, it read the same as the original, which had said, basically, "Jay Gatsby was an evil-doer.
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NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big businesses moving in. Less crime. A school district under new leadership. Camden was front and center during portions of Gov. Christie's State of the State address Tuesday, as he revisited now-familiar talking points about the city as Mayor Dana L. Redd, School Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard, and Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson listened from the front of the legislative chambers. Five years ago, Christie said, violence-wracked Camden was "devoid of hope," with corrupt leadership and failing schools.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Phoenix Bankrupt! (V2 ***) Phoenix achieved commercial breakthrough with the 2009 album Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix , fueled by the inclusion of their song "1901" in a Cadillac commercial. How can you tell that the sleek, synth-happy, French power-popsters are diffident about their success? Now that they've won wealth and fame, they've chosen to call their fifth album Bankrupt! , in part to point out the hollowness of it all. And they've stuck the seven-minute, momentum-killing title track smack in the middle of their 10-song collection, just so you know that life is full of miseries when you're not hanging out with R. Kelly at Coachella.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Whether they're expecting it or not, the fun-seeking denizens of Macau have some potentially great Brahms coming their way, to judge from Thursday's unofficial preview concert of the Philadelphia Orchestra's tour of China next month. Donald Runnicles is the guest conductor, and if you've heard that he has evolved from a solid musician to a profound one of late, his Brahms Symphony No. 2 at the Kimmel Center was evidence of that. So fluidly and organically written is Brahms' Second that one seldom hears a truly fresh performance of the piece, which evolves so effortlessly from its opening three-note motif that the piece seems to play itself.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
With his cunning wisps of dance tunes and church harmonies, Schubert gives even the mildly astute performer an easy way into his music. But Imogen Cooper doesn't have the kind of mind that lends itself to the easy way in, or out. The London pianist, in Wednesday night's all-Schubert recital at the Perelman Theater, introduced an air of struggle and vulnerability that went far beyond the usual highlighting of abrupt mood swings, major-minor ambiguity, and...
SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
VILLAGE IDIOT on Monday, dressed up for the big press conference on Thursday; welcome to Howie Roseman's world. It is a strange place in which the Eagles' general manager lives, in which all of them live, including new coach Chip Kelly. It is a world in which the media is voyeuristic at best and predatory at worst, a world where people seem to be able to find out how long your lunch interview lasted before the check has been paid. As Kelly said, "Seriously, it's kind of creepy, to be honest with you. " But it is the current reality, and it bit Roseman in a very big way during the Eagles' search for a head coach.
SPORTS
November 25, 2012 | By Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Staff Writer
Can you imagine if it were Arian Foster who scored that disputed touchdown on Thanksgiving? Holy cow. Not only would Lions fans be all over the NFL, but perhaps thousands of irate fantasy owners who were playing against Foster would have marched to the league's Park Avenue office in protest - just what Manhattan traffic cops would have needed on Black Friday. But it wasn't Arian Foster. It was Justin Forsett, a running back who hasn't done anything of fantasy value since 2009, when he had 130 yards and two touchdowns for Seattle in a game against the Rams.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2012 | By Peter Rozovsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hebron is a flash point of tension between Palestinians and Jewish settlers, and the city's streets are rubble-strewn relics of strife and of shops closed by a straitened economy. Parts of Hebron are probably frightening places to be at night, and schoolchildren darting into the sidewalkless streets gave me palpitations. "God forbid we should hit one of these kids," I thought. "We won't make it out of here alive. " My driver for the day, an Israeli Arab named Alexander, said he couldn't leave his car alone in Hebron for fear that it would be stoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Of Mice and Men is so well-known and universally taught in American middle and high schools, you'd think a staged production, such as People's Light & Theatre Company's, must go out of its way to distinguish itself. But despite plenty of obvious contemporary parallels, director David Bradley keeps John Steinbeck's 1937 classic, well, classic, and stripped to its bare essence. Everyone remembers George and Lennie - that mismatched pair of bindle stiffs looking for farm work, hoping to save up some scratch and "live off the fatta the lan' " - but this production takes its time in highlighting the story's peripheral characters, the men and the sole woman on this farm who pass for a community.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
A number of Catholics attending Sunday Mass in the Philadelphia area said they backed their church's stance against President Obama's contraceptive mandate - even in its revised form - but how strongly they felt seemed to depend on their age. "It's against the Catholic [teachings]," Barbara Kashon, 66, said of birth control while leaving St. Patrick's Church off Rittenhouse Square. "I've grown up that way. " But her daughter, Kim Kashon, in her 30s, who was holding her own child in her arms, looked at her mother with astonishment and said: "Really?
NEWS
February 12, 2012
Frank Wilson is a retired book editor of The Inquirer and the proprietor of the blog Books, Inq. - The Epilogue In March 1976, the New Yorker featured what would become one of its more famous covers: a drawing by Saul Steinberg providing a Manhattanite's view of the world. In the foreground was Lower Manhattan. Then there was the Hudson and a sliver just beyond called New Jersey. Next came a modest rectangle representing what was in fact the entire United States bracketed on two sides by blank regions named Canada and Mexico.
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