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Nuclear Bombs

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NEWS
October 26, 2012
WHEN THE BIG ONE drops, I suggest we all head to Philadelphia Brewing Co. 's massive 19th-century brewhouse in Kensington. Have you ever seen the rock-solid walls and floors in that place? They'd hold up to all but a direct hit, and even if the rest of the city is a smoldering wasteland, we'd have plenty of beer for the apocalypse. People aren't so consumed by the threat of a nuclear holocaust these days. It's terrorists that have us most worried. And zombies. But 50 years ago, at the height of the Cold War, atomic bombs were a big deal.
NEWS
February 27, 2003
THE THIRD World War will make World War II look like a baby war. What good is the U.N.? According to the press, we are in Iraq already, without being sanctioned by the U.N. Many nations lay their weapons on the table of destruction. Israel, England, Russia, China, Pakistan, India and the United States have nuclear bombs, so how can Iraq threaten the world? Moses Cook, Philadelphia On Feb. 22, you ran a letter from a woman asking why North Philadelphia was left out of the survey "Does Philly Want War?"
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Six months ago, customs agents asked a Massachusetts-based firm, EG&G Inc., to supply de-activated triggering devices, or krytrons, as part of a sting operation, according to EG&G president Donald M. Kerr. The Wellesley, Mass., company is the sole U.S. manufacturer of krytrons, which are small, fingernail-sized tubes that can emit electronic pulses in less than a microsecond. They are key elements in triggering nuclear bombs, and although they have non-military applications their production and sale is strictly controlled by the U.S. government.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
President Saddam Hussein today admitted that Iraq has sophisticated binary chemical weapons and warned that if Israel attacked it Iraq will retaliate and destroy half of the Jewish state. In a speech broadcast by the state-run radio, Hussein denied Iraq was trying to build nuclear weapons. He lashed out at Western criticism of what U.S. and British authorities said were clandestine efforts by Baghdad to smuggle parts for nuclear weapons and over the March 15 execution of British-based reporter Farzan Bazoft on spying charges.
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Local congressman Curt Weldon is making headlines with claims that Russia has buried dozens of suitcase-sized nuclear bombs in the United States. "There is no doubt that the Soviets stored material in this country. The question is what and where," Weldon, a Republican House member from Delaware County, told the New York Post in a story published yesterday. Weldon did not return repeated phone calls yesterday to his home in Aston, Delaware County. Weldon told the Post that the FBI won't ask its former Cold War foe what happened to the 10 kiloton nuclear bombs.
NEWS
November 8, 2006
THERE IS only one way to win a war: Total and complete destruction of the enemy, whether it be terrorists of Hezbollah, al Qaeda or Sadaam Hussein's evil regime. The only reason we're having problems in the Middle East is our need to fight a "compassionate war," which is simply a contradiction in terms. War is a terrible thing, to be avoided at all costs, but if evil makes that impossible, threatening man's God-given right to freedom and happiness, then it must be fought for complete and total surrender.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | BY CAL THOMAS
Those "heroes" and "heroines" of the '60s never saw a cause worth fighting for or a war worth winning. They have now delivered the final insult. As the anniversary of the end of World War II approaches, they are reaching back a generation and demeaning their parents' sacrifice, patriotism and decisiveness, saying there was no need and no excuse for dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Even The Washington Post was offended by a purely propagandistic program narrated by Peter Jennings on ABC. Reviewer Ken Ringle called it "an ingenue's stroll down the narrow tunnels of academic revisionism with only occasional intimations that larger truths may lie outside.
NEWS
April 16, 2006
Oh, God. It's all happening again. The scare-mongering, the dark talk of nuclear bombs handed off to terrorists. The rumblings about "regime change" and popular uprising. The up-tempo war planning done to a chorus of think-tank bravado. The smirky denials from the Pentagon. The acolytes chattering about the President's sense of history. Americans have seen this movie. It is called Operation Iraqi Freedom, and it grinds on bloodily to this day. Now, the camera shifts to Iran.
NEWS
November 1, 2003 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Five days after the White House blocked their plans to travel to North Korea, Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.) and a bipartisan group of lawmakers have complained directly to President Bush about ill treatment from his national security staff. A letter dated Thursday accused Bush's national security team of "arrogant and disrespectful" treatment. The five Republicans and five Democrats who would constitute the delegation told Bush they were "offended" and believed "you are being ill-served by your National Security Council staff.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By REGINALD STUART and TONI LOCY, Daily News Staff Writers
In a case that began with an arrest in Philadelphia and quickly mushroomed into an international incident, the government of Pakistan today denied that it is building nuclear weapons. A Pakistani Foreign Ministry spokesman told reporters in Islamabad that his government was not responsible for the actions of a Pakistani native charged here Friday with trying to ship a key ingredient in nuclear bombs to his homeland. "Neither the government of Pakistan nor any of its agencies sponsored any violation of the export laws of the United States," the spokesman said.
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NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1950, at age 24, Kenneth Ford left his graduate studies at Princeton, hopped in a Chevy and drove to New Mexico to help build the world's deadliest weapon. For two years, he toiled covertly with other physicists. Eventually they unlocked the secrets of the first hydrogen bomb. Retired in Philadelphia half a century later, Ford wrote it all down. Now he is sparring with the government over whether his memoir reveals nuclear secrets. His book, Building the H-Bomb: A Personal History , was published March 23, over objections from the Department of Energy that it included descriptive details of the bomb-building project.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
WHEN THE BIG ONE drops, I suggest we all head to Philadelphia Brewing Co. 's massive 19th-century brewhouse in Kensington. Have you ever seen the rock-solid walls and floors in that place? They'd hold up to all but a direct hit, and even if the rest of the city is a smoldering wasteland, we'd have plenty of beer for the apocalypse. People aren't so consumed by the threat of a nuclear holocaust these days. It's terrorists that have us most worried. And zombies. But 50 years ago, at the height of the Cold War, atomic bombs were a big deal.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
Don't threaten voter-ID judges The strength of our democracy is dependent upon the ability of our judiciary to function free of outside influences, basing decisions on the law and the facts, not on public pressure or criticism by individuals or political groups. The suggestion that voters might retaliate against certain judges should they disagree with the decision on the Pennsylvania's voter-ID law ("Hold justices accountable on voter ID," Sunday) is an attack on the democratic process itself.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Rebecca Santana and B.K. Bangash, Associated Press
KAMRA, Pakistan - Heavily armed Taliban fighters blasted their way into a Pakistani air force base with possible links to the country's nuclear program in a brazen assault that took two hours of fighting to put down, leaving a security officer and nine insurgents dead and underscoring the group's continued threat despite numerous military offensives. Hours later, Taliban gunmen in northern Pakistan forced 20 Shiite Muslims off buses, lined them up and killed them, the latest in a series of sectarian attacks that the government has seemingly done little to stop.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Betsy Blaney, Associated Press
AMARILLO, Texas - The last of the nation's biggest nuclear bombs, a Cold War relic 600 times more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, was dismantled Tuesday in what one energy official called a milestone in President Obama's mission to rid the world of nuclear weapons. Workers in Texas separated the roughly 300 pounds of high explosives inside from the special nuclear material - uranium - known as the pit. The work was done outside of public view for security reasons, but explosives from a bomb taken apart earlier were detonated as officials and reporters watched from less than a mile away.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
By John Rossi Some years ago, Paul Fussell wrote a controversial essay titled "Thank God for the Atom Bomb. " In it, he argued that dropping two nuclear bombs on Japan was necessary to end the war in the Pacific. With today's 65th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima - followed three days later by Nagasaki - memories of the awesome event in world history are sure to appear. One question in particular will be raised again: Was it right for President Harry S. Truman to order the use of atomic weapons?
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last few months, Iran has advanced to the brink of having a nuclear weapon. It has accumulated at least two tons of enriched uranium - enough to make two nuclear bombs, according to a U.N. report released Monday. Though the uranium is meant to be used for power generation and a medical reactor, it's a short step from there to bomb-grade fuel. The same technology can easily be ramped up to make nuclear weapons, said physicist David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The era of Jericho has come to an end with this month's release of Jericho: The Second Season from Paramount ($29.99; not rated). The story behind the show is as exciting as its plot. A brilliantly written, highly addictive, post-nuclear thriller, Jericho was killed by CBS after its first season. But when fans formed one of the biggest such protest movements in TV history, the network changed its decision and OKd a seven-episode concluding season. Find out which fiendish terrorist(s)
NEWS
May 9, 2007
Nutter the insider Here's one good reason to ignore the rants and recommendations of Editorial Page editor Chris Satullo ("10 great reasons to say no to Knox," column, Sunday). His board twice endorsed Republican mayoral candidate Sam Katz, the same Sam Katz against whom the Delaware State Supreme Court upheld a chancery court ruling that he had defrauded his former business partners out of $2.1 million. You're a terrific judge of character and ethics, Mr. Satullo. In your zeal to anoint St. Michael Nutter the next mayor of Philadelphia, you conveniently overlooked a significant development reported in your own paper.
NEWS
March 2, 2007 | By Claudia Rosett
It would be wonderful to feel warm and happy about the diplomacy now breaking out all over. Five years ago America was confronting the axis of evil. Today we are offering access to envoys. After years in the cold, North Korea's Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan is on his way to New York for talks involving U.S. promises of aid and diplomatic normalization if Pyongyang just stops making nuclear bombs. Later this month, at a "neighbors" conference convened by Iraq, America plans to sit down with Syria and Iran, whose leaders, in the grand tradition of Tony Soprano, are sending delegates to ponder ways of "stabilizing" the region they have been destabilizing with terrorist networks and bombs.
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