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Nuclear Fuel

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NEWS
August 23, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Mark McDonald contributed to this report
What New York doesn't want, Philadelphia may get - 33 rail shipments of radioactive fuel rumbling along the edge of Center City and through a tunnel next to the Art Museum. But although the deep-of-night shipments, which could start next month, have sparked opposition from some City Council members, the Rendell administration sees the shipments as "a routine procedure," according to a top administration official. "We don't do things here based on what they do in New York City," said Joseph Certaine, deputy managing director for operations and head of the Office of Emergency Management.
NEWS
July 22, 2010 | By Chris Kahn, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Exelon Corp. said Thursday its second-quarter net income dropped 32 percent as fuel costs for its fleet of nuclear power plants increased and its utilities spent more on battling storms. The Chicago utility, which powers customers in northern Illinois and Southeastern Pennsylvania, said earnings fell to $445 million, or 67 cents per share, for the three months ended June 30 from $657 million, or 99 cents per share, a year ago. Revenue rose to $4.4 billion from $4.14 billion.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Dave Davies contributed to this report
The first of 33 rail shipments of nuclear fuel will crawl through Philadelphia later this month, surrounded by a surge of concern about the presence of nuclear power. Philadelphia Electric Co. announced yesterday it had reached agreement to go ahead with the night shipments, totaling 200 tons of radioactive material, through Southwest Philadelphia, Center City and other neighborhoods to its Limerick generating station in Montgomery County. But several City Council members planned to press today for hearings on the shipments, which earlier were to be routed through New York.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini and Brian Murphy, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - In defiant swipes at its foes, Iran said Wednesday it is dramatically closer to mastering the production of nuclear fuel even as the U.S. weighs tougher pressures and Tehran's suspected shadow war with Israel brings probes far beyond the Middle East. Iran further struck back at the West by indicating it was on the verge of imposing a midwinter fuel squeeze to Europe in retaliation for a looming boycott of Iranian oil, but denied reports earlier in the day that six nations had already been cut off. The uncompromising messages from Iran, however, came with a counterpoint.
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is saying no to a new rule that would allow nuclear power plants to store radioactive spent fuel on site up to 60 years beyond the useful life of the plant. In the case of the Oyster Creek plant, which is due to shut down in 2019, the rule would allow spent fuel to remain at the site, which is in Ocean County next to Barnegat Bay, until 2079. The previous limit was 30 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued the rule in December In February, New York, Vermont and Connecticut filed a challenge.
NEWS
August 10, 2005 | By Trudy Rubin
Back when the Bush administration was planning the Iraq war, the demise of Saddam was meant to have a ripple effect on other rogue states. Especially, states that helped terrorists and were building nuclear weapons. Neoconservative pundits predicted that Iraq's neighbor Iran, another member of the President's "axis of evil," might also undergo regime change. But the ripple effect has boomeranged. President Bush's gross miscalculations about Iraq have emboldened Iran's mullahs.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | By James Cordrey and Bill Ordine, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rail shipments of slightly used nuclear fuel will begin within the next week, passing through Philadelphia and several suburban communities en route to Philadelphia Electric Co.'s Limerick power plant in Montgomery County. PE spokesman Bill Jones publicly presented the utility's plans for 33 such shipments to the Upper Merion Board of Supervisors on Thursday night. On Sept. 13, PE privately briefed officials from all the municipalities along the shipment route in Delaware, Montgomery and Chester Counties.
NEWS
May 26, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The United States and Russia will sign an agreement tomorrow aimed at finally locking down some of the world's most dangerous and poorly guarded nuclear fuel. Atomic scientists have long warned that supplies of highly enriched uranium at research and university reactors around the world are particularly vulnerable to theft by extremists. The new U.S.-Russia program would retrieve the uranium from 20 reactors in 17 countries and bring it back to Russia for storage. "This fuel is of great interest to terrorists, so the program is quite significant," said Daniil Kobyakov, a nonproliferation expert at the PIR Center, an independent policy research organization in Moscow.
NEWS
February 19, 2005 | By Mark McDonald and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, rejecting U.S. suspicions that Iran is trying to develop nuclear weapons, said yesterday that Russia would continue to assist the Islamic Republic with nuclear and military projects. He also said he would soon make a state visit to Iran, although the Kremlin announced no dates. Putin's comments, made less than a week before he and President Bush are due to meet in Bratislava, Slovakia, threaten to complicate Bush's efforts to get an international consensus on how to deal with Iran's nuclear program, a key goal of his European trip, which begins tomorrow.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff yesterday found nothing objectionable about the proposed shipment of 200 tons of second-hand nuclear fuel through Philadelphia. "At this time, we're very satisfied with the level and depth of the planning," said Charles W. Hehl, the NRC's area director of radiation safety and safeguards. Hehl spoke after an informal public session at which representatives of Philadelphia Electric Co. and the Long Island Power Authority presented their plans to transport 560 irradiated fuel assemblies from the defunct Shoreham power plant on Long Island to PE's Limerick reactors near Pottstown.
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NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Privately held Holtec International is among a group of U.S. companies developing small modular nuclear reactors whose main components can be built in factories and assembled at utility sites either individually or in groups. Small modular reactors, a long-term goal of the industry, are seen as an antidote to the massive power plants whose legendary cost overruns have made traditional new reactors uncompetitive. Critics say there is no market for the small reactors, and the Union of Concerned Scientists expressed skepticism in a report last year that the industry could develop the reactors less expensively than the big plants.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey officials on Thursday approved $260 million in tax credits for an Evesham-based power-plant supplier to build a manufacturing plant on the Camden waterfront. The deal for Holtec International, said to be one of the largest tax-credit awards ever granted by the state, is expected to create 235 jobs and retain 160, said the state Economic Development Authority. Erin Gold, an authority spokeswoman, said it was the state's understanding that the 160 jobs would be relocated from Evesham, where the company has its headquarters.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Tom Avril and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
When you take a picture of something that measures just a few atoms across, you need an awfully steady place to mount your camera. This explains why, on the corner of 32d and Walnut Streets, construction crews hammered and dug their way 18 feet into the ground. They sank stout caissons into the underlying Wissahickon schist. And then, in a "sweet spot" designated for a series of high-tech basement labs, they poured a slab of concrete three feet thick. The result, despite the nearby urban rumble of trucks, buses, and trains, is an unyielding platform for "cameras" - really, electron microscopes - to study particles that are billionths of a meter in diameter.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Nasser Karimi, Associated Press
TEHRAN - American proposals for direct talks with Iran are pointless while Washington is "holding a gun" to the country through sanctions, Iran's supreme leader said Thursday, quashing a possible breakthrough in contacts with the West over the nuclear standoff. The message from Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who has the final say in all major decisions in Iran, was reiterated by Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad during a news conference in Cairo later in the day. Their dismissal of one-on-one dialogue raises the stakes when wider negotiations between Iran and world powers, including the United States, resume this month.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran is weighing a more confrontational strategy at possible renewed nuclear talks with world powers, threatening to boost levels of uranium enrichment unless the West makes clear concessions to ease sanctions. Such a gambit - outlined by senior Iranian officials in interviews this week - could push Iran's nuclear program far closer to the "red line" set by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for possible military options. But it also suggests that economic pressures and diplomacy have pushed Iran to the point of considering an ultimatum-style end game in efforts to seek relief from the U.S. and European sanctions, which have targeted Iran's vital oil exports and its ability to use international banking networks.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
VIENNA - The U.N. nuclear agency chief on Monday announced new talks with Iran and urged it to sign a deal that would relaunch his long-stalled probe into suspicions that Tehran worked secretly on atomic arms. For the first time, International Atomic Energy Agency head Yukiya Amano also said that Iran had demolished buildings and carried out other activities at a military facility that his agency believes was a site for such work. Diplomats and officials accredited to the IAEA had spoken of similar work previously, describing it as an apparent attempt to clear the site of evidence of clandestine weapons-related work but confirmation by Amano lent weight to the suspicions.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Lara Jakes and Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iran and six world powers wrapped up talks Thursday still far apart over how to oversee Tehran's atomic program, but with resolve to keep dialogue going as an alternative to possible military action. Envoys said they would meet again next month in Moscow after negotiations stretched out for extra hours and a sandstorm shut the airport in Iraq's capital. But the two sides agreed on little else during two days of discussions that underscored the serious challenges of reaching accords between Iran and the West.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Nasser Karimi and Brian Murphy, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - The head of the U.N. nuclear agency pushed Monday for a breakthrough pact with Iran to resume inspections into suspected secret atomic weapons work and possibly set in motion further deal making when envoys from Tehran and world powers gather later this week in Baghdad. The mission by International Atomic Energy Agency chief Yukiya Amano raised speculation about greater flexibility by Iranian officials as they struggle to balance the blows from Western sanctions and their insistence never to abandon the country's nuclear program.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Anne Gearan And Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
CAMP DAVID, Md. - President Obama and leaders of other major industrial powers stepped outside discussions of European economic woes and Afghanistan that will dominate a long weekend of summitry for a look Friday at options to solidify world resolve against development of an Iranian nuclear bomb and encourage a more forceful response to worsening violence in Syria. Obama will have the ear of key players on both issues during back-to-back G-8 and NATO summits. Discussion will be aimed directly and indirectly at Russia, a sometime protector of both Iran and Syria and the chief blockade to such U.S. goals as an arms embargo on Syria.
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