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Nuclear Holocaust

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REAL_ESTATE
October 16, 1988 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lights aren't on sometimes at NewMarket Mall, but not because no one's home. Yet. In recent weeks, the lights went out for two of the last three major tenants in the glass pavilion that is the heart of NewMarket, a shopping area spanning both sides of Second Street between Pine and Lombard Streets in Society Hill. First, the Choice Seating furniture store moved out. Then on Oct. 8, Kanpai, a Japanese restaurant, closed its doors after 12 years. Now only The Limited women's clothing shop and a small advertising agency remain in the pavilion.
NEWS
May 14, 1986
The term "Star Wars" for the President's defensive system SDI is very misleading to the public. Strategic Defense Initiative is not an offensive weapon. This system would protect the United States from a possible nuclear onslaught. SDI will not have the ability to launch nuclear missiles; however, it will be able to shoot down oncoming missiles with lasers. The longer the liberals oppose approving this plan the longer it will be until there is a sense of security from a nuclear holocaust in the United States and throughout the world.
NEWS
March 13, 2001
Earlier this month, the media in Phila delphia got carried away. They panick- ed some fools. One bought four gallons of milk and 10 loaves of bread. What was she preparing for - a nuclear holocaust? There is no way anyone in Philadelphia will be isolated for 21 days due to snow. Let's enjoy the weather and not sit in front of TV listening to morons lucky they can find Philadelphia on a map. B.P. CONNOR, Berlin, N.J. Thank you to those pointing out how ridiculous the snow coverage is. We are talking about snow.
NEWS
March 9, 1999
Some directors make movies that clutch clumsily at emotion. Some splatter gore and noise mindlessly across the screen and call it daring. Stanley Kubrick, who died Sunday at 70, made movies that thought out loud - in ways that only movies, with their potent marriage of image and sound, can. That doesn't mean he was a captive of the art house. He made some films - from Spartacus to the mythic, mystifying 2001: A Space Odyssey - that had legs at the box office. He could work in blood-red - to the point, in the darkly prophetic A Clockwork Orange, of spawning outrage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you want to get people to thinking about the possibility of a nuclear holocaust, there are two words you ought not mention together, playwrights Heath Allen and Hal Taussig agree. The words are nuclear and holocaust. The very mention of those words, Allen says, produces the phenomenon that he and Taussig are trying to penetrate - "psychic numbing," which he explains as "the term psychologists use to describe our society's inability to deal with the nuclear threat that we live under now. " So how do you get people thinking about the possibility of a n------ h --------?
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The late Andrei Tarkovsky died of cancer in December at the age of 54. To call the Soviet expatriate a film director would be as gross a misnomer as identifying Leonardo as a cartoonist. Tarkovsky was a master whose canvas happened to be film, a poet whose forebodings produced movies uniquely visual and singularly visceral in their impact. Tarkovsky's award-winning last film, The Sacrifice, sadly is not his best - though it might be his most pretentious. Suffice to say that even pretentious Tarkovsky has more to recommend it than unaffected most anyone else.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wednesday night will see the premiere of two cable series very much from the opposite ends of the spectrum. CW adds to its already extensive lineup of fantasy and sci-fi dramas teeming with hot, hardbodied teens with the dystopian morality play The 100 at 9 p.m., while HBO will kick off Doll & Em at 10 p.m., a sitcom for grown-ups starring the terrific British actress Emily Mortimer. Cocreated and cowritten by Mortimer and her real-life best friend Dolly Wells, Doll & Em is a droll, if not exactly original, behind-the-scenes look at Hollywood in the tradition of HBO hits Entourage and Curb Your Enthusiasm . Like them, Doll & Em also is based on real life - but as run through a twisted, melodramatic wringer.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | BY DONALD KAUL
The results of the recent elections in Europe were really quite droll, if alarming. As Plato would have said, had he but the wit, they were the best of elections, they were the worst of elections. (As you may have noticed, I have slipped into my George Will disguise, to give my foreign policy analysis more authority; it's heavy lifting, but you have to make a living.) It's not fair to call what happened in Britain an election, actually. It was more of a parliamentary lynching.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Until the End of the World" comes dangerously close to an accurate description of its own duration on screen. It's a failed but brave attempt to mix a road picture with fancy science fiction. The movie fails because it has too many ideas, rather than too few. At the better part of three hours, it wears out its welcome. For an hour or so, "Until the End of the World" is a light-hearted traveling adventure, as a free-spirited woman (Solveig Dommartin) attempts to follow a mysterious man (William Hurt)
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SPORTS
June 10, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
NOW THAT the Eagles have completed the shorts-and-two-hand-touch portion of their schedule and head off for some well-deserved R & R before the start of Camp Pederson in late July, I'd like to take a moment to offer some unsolicited advice to their "passionate" fans: Let it go. By "it," I mean your over-the-top anger toward quarterback Sam Bradford over his late-April trade request and two-week NovaCare boycott after the Eagles moved up to...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Has there ever been a better crucible for drama than an apocalypse? Whether it be a zombie apocalypse, an environmental meltdown, or nuclear war, that dread occasion can be put to great use by writers and filmmakers. That includes Robert C. O'Brien, whose posthumously published sci-fi novel, Z for Zachariah , has been adapted into a lean, tight, killer character study by Compliance director Craig Zobel. Mildly reminiscent of Cormac McCarthy's The Road and its 2009 film adaptation, the stirring Z for Zachariah is about three lonely souls trying to survive in a world devoid of other people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wednesday night will see the premiere of two cable series very much from the opposite ends of the spectrum. CW adds to its already extensive lineup of fantasy and sci-fi dramas teeming with hot, hardbodied teens with the dystopian morality play The 100 at 9 p.m., while HBO will kick off Doll & Em at 10 p.m., a sitcom for grown-ups starring the terrific British actress Emily Mortimer. Cocreated and cowritten by Mortimer and her real-life best friend Dolly Wells, Doll & Em is a droll, if not exactly original, behind-the-scenes look at Hollywood in the tradition of HBO hits Entourage and Curb Your Enthusiasm . Like them, Doll & Em also is based on real life - but as run through a twisted, melodramatic wringer.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 50 years, we lived in dread lest the Cold War end in a nuclear holocaust. The Soviet empire may be dead, but not our nuclear fears: What if a terrorist group or rogue nation deploys the bomb? Yet, during that entire time, we haven't stopped to consider an equally grave danger right here at home: the accidental detonation of one of our warheads. "We came close to having nuclear weapons detonate on American soil a few times during the Cold War," said Eric Schlosser, author of Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety (Penguin, $36)
NEWS
October 26, 2012
WHEN THE BIG ONE drops, I suggest we all head to Philadelphia Brewing Co. 's massive 19th-century brewhouse in Kensington. Have you ever seen the rock-solid walls and floors in that place? They'd hold up to all but a direct hit, and even if the rest of the city is a smoldering wasteland, we'd have plenty of beer for the apocalypse. People aren't so consumed by the threat of a nuclear holocaust these days. It's terrorists that have us most worried. And zombies. But 50 years ago, at the height of the Cold War, atomic bombs were a big deal.
NEWS
October 27, 2006
The dropout plague With your front-page headline "Philadelphia's dropout crisis" in the Oct. 19 edition and your in-depth coverage, The Inquirer is to be congratulated for bringing attention to one of Philadelphia's most urgent issues, and to an epidemic that has been invisible for too long. The city's media can play a critical part in building the public will to address this problem. Dropout rates around 40 percent are unfortunately nothing new, but these grim statistics have not often been thrust into public view.
NEWS
March 13, 2001
Earlier this month, the media in Phila delphia got carried away. They panick- ed some fools. One bought four gallons of milk and 10 loaves of bread. What was she preparing for - a nuclear holocaust? There is no way anyone in Philadelphia will be isolated for 21 days due to snow. Let's enjoy the weather and not sit in front of TV listening to morons lucky they can find Philadelphia on a map. B.P. CONNOR, Berlin, N.J. Thank you to those pointing out how ridiculous the snow coverage is. We are talking about snow.
NEWS
March 9, 1999
Some directors make movies that clutch clumsily at emotion. Some splatter gore and noise mindlessly across the screen and call it daring. Stanley Kubrick, who died Sunday at 70, made movies that thought out loud - in ways that only movies, with their potent marriage of image and sound, can. That doesn't mean he was a captive of the art house. He made some films - from Spartacus to the mythic, mystifying 2001: A Space Odyssey - that had legs at the box office. He could work in blood-red - to the point, in the darkly prophetic A Clockwork Orange, of spawning outrage.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | By Robert S. McNamara
Fifty years after President Truman's decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, an avalanche of speculation surrounding the strategic and moral necessity of doing so has crept into our national discourse. Regrettably, this discussion has shifted attention away from a more pressing topic - the future direction of U.S. nuclear weapons policy. Throughout the Cold War period, the United States held a two-faced attitude toward nuclear forces. While we relied heavily on these weapons to promote our central security goals, we sought to restrain other countries from acquiring them.
NEWS
May 30, 1994 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When he first visited the Pentagon last fall, Russia's defense minister looked around and mused: "I've only known this place by its coordinates. " By today, Russia will reprogram those coordinates in its nuclear bombs and the Pentagon will no longer be Ground Zero. Bombs that have been trained on one another for almost 50 years - roughly 30,000 land- and sea-based nuclear missiles in the United States and the former Soviet republic - will have no target or will be pointed at the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.
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