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Nuclear Materials

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NEWS
November 28, 2001 | By Jackie Koszczuk and Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It's hard to imagine a worse worst-case scenario. Someone in Osama bin Laden's terrorist network could acquire nuclear materials from former Soviet Union stockpiles to use in a new attack on the United States. President Bush gave credence to just such a doomsday threat earlier this month when he disclosed that the government had information that bin Laden's al-Qaeda organization had tried to acquire weapons of mass destruction. Yet recent efforts in Congress to boost spending to secure nuclear stockpiles overseas, particularly those controlled by Russia, have met a highly effective opponent - Bush.
NEWS
April 18, 1997 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The United States and Russia are making little progress in their joint struggle to prevent the theft or misuse of dangerous nuclear materials scattered across the former Soviet Union. Less than 1 percent of the 1,500 tons of plutonium and highly enriched uranium that can be used to make atomic bombs is properly protected from terrorists or rogue nations, a special panel of the National Research Council reported yesterday. Russian officials have already acknowledged two dozen thefts and attempted thefts of nuclear materials.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | Associated Press
A court decision issued Tuesday brings new uncertainty to whether nuclear materials on a Gloucester County site will be shipped to Utah or kept in place. The ruling from a federal appeals court in Washington sent the question back to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The commission ruled in 2011 that New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection would be in charge of the cleanup at the site in Newfield where Shieldalloy Metallurgical Corp. made metal alloys from 1955 until 1998.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Evoking a diabolical scenario that could come right out of a Tom Clancy techno-thriller, law enforcement officials from three countries warned yesterday that organized crime groups from the former Soviet Union may soon be able to steal nuclear material and threaten international security. Commenting on reports of thefts of uranium and other nuclear fuel, FBI Director Louis J. Freeh said he was "gravely concerned Russian organized crime members may have already attained or will attain the capacity to steal nuclear weapons or weapons-grade nuclear materials.
NEWS
February 4, 2008 | By Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr
The Democratic presidential debate last month in Manchester, N.H., was noteworthy in one significant respect. For the first time during this long presidential campaign, the candidates were asked how they would work to prevent an act of nuclear terrorism against the United States. I hope that this is not the last time this issue is raised during this campaign. The prospect that a terrorist group will detonate an improvised nuclear weapon in an American city is the single greatest national security danger facing the United States today.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By Ellen Dean Wilson, Special to The Inquirer
Birmingham Township has been declared a nuclear-free area by its supervisors. The board voted 2-0 Monday night, with one abstention, to pass an ordinance forbidding the transportation, manufacture or storage of nuclear materials in the township. Supervisor William Wylie said after the meeting that he had abstained from the vote because of suggestions that the ordinance may not be enforced. For example, he said, nuclear materials may be allowed to be carried along the township's portion of Route 202 even with the ordinance in effect.
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What is being done to counter nuclear-proliferation threats? The Cooperative Threat Reduction Act of 1991, commonly known as Nunn-Lugar, authorized the Department of Defense to help former Soviet republics destroy weapons of mass destruction and reduce the dangers of proliferation. Additionally, since 1994, the Department of Energy has paid for programs to secure materials and deploy a modernized system for protection, control and accounting at the nuclear sites. Over the last four years, the United States has spent about $400 million to help Russia secure poorly guarded nuclear materials.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | By Jim Walsh
Reports that Abdullah al Muhajir was planning a radiological attack on an American city should serve as a warning about the nuclear dangers we confront. President Bush has said as much, calling the danger from weapons of mass destruction the most serious threat to our nation's security. But there is a dirty secret about "dirty" bombs that the administration prefers you didn't know. The good news about radiological weapons is that this is one threat we can actually do something about.
NEWS
November 2, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Martial law in China after deadly ethnic riots Police by the thousands patrolled China's Henan Province yesterday and residents hunkered down in their homes after deadly street fights between members of the country's main ethnic group and a Muslim minority. As many as 5,000 people fought with sticks and burned several houses over the weekend in violence between Hui Muslims and members of the Han ethnic majority, according to residents of the town of Langchenggang interviewed by phone.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
IRAQ CRACK Saddam Hussein is confident that U.N. inspectors will never find his stash of nuclear materials. He hid them in a theater showing "Hudson Hawk. " - Johnny Carson WHAT'S UP DOC? Alongside AIDS testing for the medical profession, full disclosure should be required of taste-dead doctors who drive megabuck foreign sportscars with dumb vanity license plates (like the Jag seen tooling through Cherry Hill with the plate "FORCEPS"). - Kathleen Shea GOLDEN SLIPPERS If they keep cutting back music in the schools, what are we going to do for Mummers?
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NEWS
February 21, 2013 | Associated Press
A court decision issued Tuesday brings new uncertainty to whether nuclear materials on a Gloucester County site will be shipped to Utah or kept in place. The ruling from a federal appeals court in Washington sent the question back to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The commission ruled in 2011 that New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection would be in charge of the cleanup at the site in Newfield where Shieldalloy Metallurgical Corp. made metal alloys from 1955 until 1998.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Matthew Daly, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Hailing two decades of efforts to help the former Soviet Union secure nuclear weapons stockpiles, President Obama said Monday that the world must continue to stand guard against nuclear threats - including terrorists who seek to gain control of nuclear weapons. "We cannot let our guard down," Obama said, calling efforts to combat nuclear terrorism one of his top priorities as president. Obama praised the 20-year-old Cooperative Threat Reduction program, which has provided billions of dollars in U.S. equipment and know-how to help Russia and former Soviet bloc nations safeguard and dismantle nuclear and chemical weapons.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Ben Feller and Anne Gearan, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - President Obama intends to open his pitch for faster work to lock down nuclear material that could be used by terrorists with an up-close look at the nuclear front lines along the heavily militarized border with volatile North Korea. Obama arrived in Seoul on Sunday morning for three days of diplomacy. In the midst of an election year focused on economic concerns at home, Obama has designed a rare Asia visit that features time in just one country. He'll use much of the time to keep pressure on North Korea to back off a planned rocket launch and return to disarmament talks.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWFIELD, N.J. - New Jersey officials have been given oversight of decommissioning nuclear materials once used by a South Jersey company. The federal Nuclear Regulatory Agency ruled Wednesday that it is appropriate for New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection to be given jurisdiction over the cleanup at Sheildalloy Metallurgical Corp.'s facility in Newfield, Gloucester County. The NRC previously tried to hand over the responsibility. But the company sued, fearing that the state would force it to ship its radioactive waste to a facility in Utah.
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last few months, Iran has advanced to the brink of having a nuclear weapon. It has accumulated at least two tons of enriched uranium - enough to make two nuclear bombs, according to a U.N. report released Monday. Though the uranium is meant to be used for power generation and a medical reactor, it's a short step from there to bomb-grade fuel. The same technology can easily be ramped up to make nuclear weapons, said physicist David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security in Washington.
NEWS
April 15, 2010
President Obama's leadership of a 47-nation summit on nuclear weapons was focused on the right goal - preventing terrorists from getting their hands on nukes. World leaders need to work together with a sense of urgency to secure nuclear arsenals and to share information on extremists trying to obtain weapons of mass destruction. Obama's emphasis on diplomacy makes such cooperation more likely. Obama also won a pledge from foreign leaders to meet his goal of securing all nuclear materials within four years.
NEWS
October 23, 2008 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Warning of a "dark situation" and tension spreading in the world, former chief U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix yesterday called for renewed international effort to rid the world of nuclear weapons. With Iran and North Korea developing nuclear weapons, Blix said, a military approach in either situation would be "catastrophic. " "As we see in the case of North Korea and Iran, the military means are very limited," Blix said. "I'm not a pacifist, but we have to believe in a new world of interdependence.
NEWS
September 15, 2008 | By Mira Kamdar
While everyone has been abuzz about Sarah Palin, perhaps the most important development in the world has been unfolding with almost no attention. India and the United States, along with deep-pocketed corporations, have been steadily pushing along a lucrative and dangerous new nuclear pact. Both governments have been working at a fever pitch to get the U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Agreement approved by the 45-country Nuclear Suppliers Group, which governs the world's trade in nuclear materials, and before Congress for a final vote before it adjourns this month.
NEWS
February 4, 2008 | By Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr
The Democratic presidential debate last month in Manchester, N.H., was noteworthy in one significant respect. For the first time during this long presidential campaign, the candidates were asked how they would work to prevent an act of nuclear terrorism against the United States. I hope that this is not the last time this issue is raised during this campaign. The prospect that a terrorist group will detonate an improvised nuclear weapon in an American city is the single greatest national security danger facing the United States today.
NEWS
November 2, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Martial law in China after deadly ethnic riots Police by the thousands patrolled China's Henan Province yesterday and residents hunkered down in their homes after deadly street fights between members of the country's main ethnic group and a Muslim minority. As many as 5,000 people fought with sticks and burned several houses over the weekend in violence between Hui Muslims and members of the Han ethnic majority, according to residents of the town of Langchenggang interviewed by phone.
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