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Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty

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NEWS
April 27, 2013
George Bunn, 87, a leading figure in the field of arms control who helped draft and negotiate the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons worldwide, died April 21 at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. He had spinal cancer, said his son Matthew Bunn. In 1945, while serving in the Navy, Mr. Bunn was on a ship bound for Japan when atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki brought an end to World War II. "He was convinced that the atomic bomb saved his life," his son said Thursday.
NEWS
June 6, 1995 | BY EDWARD A. AGUILAR
Vice President Al Gore spoke recenytly at a conference that was arguably more important by far than the Clinton-Yeltsin "working summit" in Moscow. Yet the U.S. media pretty much ignored it. The conference, culminating a year-long review of the Nuclear Non- Proliferation Treaty, was called to determine whether to extend the treaty signed by 178 nations. Only this treaty stands between those countries and nuclear weapons. The treaty, Gore said, "also helps keep regional rivalries from evolving into regional (nuclear)
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | Daily News wire services
GENEVA DOC HANGS SELF, HAD CHOPPED UP KIN A prominent gynecologist who murdered his sister-in-law, chopped up her corpse in his bathtub and scattered the body parts in a forest, hanged himself in his prison cell yesterday. In a country where violent crime is rare, Dr. Marcel Walther earned lurid tabloid headlines over the past week as "Doctor Death. " Spicing up the story were allegations that he was a Jekyll-and-Hyde character who charmed some patients while abusing others, and reports of his jet-set lifestyle.
NEWS
April 19, 2003
For four weeks America's eyes have been squarely focused on Iraq, where sons and daughters, fathers and mothers, husbands and wives took on Saddam Hussein and successfully ousted the despotic ruler. Now the nation should turn its attention to Beijing, where scheduled talks next week will attempt to seek ways to deal with an increasingly belligerent North Korea. China must be thanked for getting us this far. After pulling out of the 1994 nuclear non-proliferation treaty in October, North Korea insisted that it would only negotiate with the United States.
NEWS
October 8, 1999
A worldwide ban on testing The Bomb would make the United States and the world safer. If ratified by all the nuclear-capable countries, this ban could help chill the atom-bomb brinkmanship of India, Pakistan and others. In other words, the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty - currently on life support in the U.S. Senate - is a tool to keep nuclear stockpiles from encircling the globe. It would complement the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Unfortunately, the Republicans are emphasizing not the benefits of stopping these weapons' spread, but the supposed disadvantage if the United States isn't able to set off a nuclear explosion every now and then.
NEWS
February 20, 1994
Carrots don't work without sticks. That's the message the Clinton administration should learn from North Korea's welcome decision to permit full inspection of seven sites that are believed to be part of a nuclear weapons program. The North Korean move came less than a week before the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was set to censure the Pyongyang regime for violating a 1992 pledge to permit the inspections. The censure would have led to a United Nations Security Council vote for economic sanctions against North Korea.
NEWS
May 4, 2013
Obama: Mexico set to advance SAN JOSE, Costa Rica - President Obama on Friday cast Mexico as a nation ready to take "its rightful place in the world" and move past the drug battles and violence that have defined its relationship with the United States. He then headed to Costa Rica to prod Central American leaders to tackle those same issues more aggressively. Obama's visit to Mexico and Costa Rica is his first to Latin America since winning reelection. In Mexico in particular, he tried to set a new course for ties between the United States and its neighbor, promoting Mexico's improving economy and its democracy.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
More than three decades after India successfully tested a nuclear device, President Bush will travel to New Delhi tomorrow to welcome India into the world's exclusive nuclear club. His willingness to acknowledge reality might seem to be a small step, but it could prove to be as significant as President Richard Nixon's decision to open relations with communist China. Just as Nixon cultivated China to counter the Soviet Union, India could serve as a regional check on China's growing clout.
NEWS
March 13, 1993 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this article
North Korea's surprise withdrawal from the world's nuclear nonproliferation club has renewed an old question: Is North Korea hiding a nuclear weapons program? Or is it just feeling pressured and resentful? The United States and its allies reacted with concern yesterday to North Korea's announcement that it was withdrawing from the Nuclear Non- Proliferation Treaty. The U.S. State Department said it deplored the move and called on North Korea to reverse the decision. Spokesman Richard Boucher in Washington refused to say whether the United States believes North Korea has nuclear weapons, but said there were "significant uncertainties.
NEWS
March 8, 2006
President Bush's trip to South Asia showed he grasps the region's vast strategic importance, and that he hasn't lost his taste for taking huge gambles with U.S. foreign policy. The nuclear energy and weapons deal he struck with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh could be a shining moment for governing nuclear development around the world - or it could blow a dangerous hole in the disarmament framework while gaining little in return. The deal, which Congress still must approve, would reverse long-standing U.S. policy and officially recognize India as a nuclear power.
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NEWS
May 4, 2013
Obama: Mexico set to advance SAN JOSE, Costa Rica - President Obama on Friday cast Mexico as a nation ready to take "its rightful place in the world" and move past the drug battles and violence that have defined its relationship with the United States. He then headed to Costa Rica to prod Central American leaders to tackle those same issues more aggressively. Obama's visit to Mexico and Costa Rica is his first to Latin America since winning reelection. In Mexico in particular, he tried to set a new course for ties between the United States and its neighbor, promoting Mexico's improving economy and its democracy.
NEWS
April 27, 2013
George Bunn, 87, a leading figure in the field of arms control who helped draft and negotiate the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons worldwide, died April 21 at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. He had spinal cancer, said his son Matthew Bunn. In 1945, while serving in the Navy, Mr. Bunn was on a ship bound for Japan when atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki brought an end to World War II. "He was convinced that the atomic bomb saved his life," his son said Thursday.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
What to do about Kim Jong-un, the world's greatest showman, who is noisily threatening a nuclear war on the Korean peninsula and preparing to test a missile that could reach Guam? Politicians and pundits are furiously debating the answer, but I've heard no ideas likely to persuade North Korea's twenty-something leader to behave better. That is, until Tuesday, when a prominent South Korean legislator suggested a response that would be bitterly opposed by Washington (and Beijing and Pyongyang)
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last few months, Iran has advanced to the brink of having a nuclear weapon. It has accumulated at least two tons of enriched uranium - enough to make two nuclear bombs, according to a U.N. report released Monday. Though the uranium is meant to be used for power generation and a medical reactor, it's a short step from there to bomb-grade fuel. The same technology can easily be ramped up to make nuclear weapons, said physicist David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security in Washington.
NEWS
April 16, 2006 | By Warren P. Strobel, John Walcott and Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The evidence that Iran is trying to develop nuclear weapons is stronger and more widely accepted - internationally and within the U.S. government - than the Bush administration's flawed case about Iraq's alleged weapons of mass destruction four years ago. But the question of what to do about Iran's nuclear ambitions is, if anything, more hotly contested. That's particularly true because 150,000 U.S. troops are tied down next door in Iraq and Afghanistan. Iran's radical president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, announced this week that his country's scientists have produced low-enriched uranium - far less than what is needed for a nuclear bomb but a rebuff nonetheless to U.N. Security Council demands that Iran halt enrichment work.
NEWS
March 10, 2006
Bush's smart move Re: "A damper on Bush's India trip," March 3: The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty has not worked because it is discriminatory. It provides the five so-called nuclear powers the right to keep and enhance their arsenals of nuclear weapons along with the "veto power" while asking others not to acquire the capability. Total disarmament has remained empty talk. More than 30 years of lecturing has not persuaded India to give up its nuclear program. George Bush's move to provide civilian nuclear technology and know-how to India is a smart move.
NEWS
March 8, 2006
President Bush's trip to South Asia showed he grasps the region's vast strategic importance, and that he hasn't lost his taste for taking huge gambles with U.S. foreign policy. The nuclear energy and weapons deal he struck with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh could be a shining moment for governing nuclear development around the world - or it could blow a dangerous hole in the disarmament framework while gaining little in return. The deal, which Congress still must approve, would reverse long-standing U.S. policy and officially recognize India as a nuclear power.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
More than three decades after India successfully tested a nuclear device, President Bush will travel to New Delhi tomorrow to welcome India into the world's exclusive nuclear club. His willingness to acknowledge reality might seem to be a small step, but it could prove to be as significant as President Richard Nixon's decision to open relations with communist China. Just as Nixon cultivated China to counter the Soviet Union, India could serve as a regional check on China's growing clout.
NEWS
June 30, 2003 | By Rep. Curt Weldon
There is a window of opportunity on the Korean peninsula. Earlier this month, I was part of a bipartisan delegation of six members of the House of Representatives that visited North Korea. I left convinced of two things: Regime change is not the solution to the current conflict, and peace is within our grasp. During our trip, the North Koreans confirmed that their nation possesses nuclear weapons, is reprocessing spent fuel and that the fuel is being used for additional weapons.
NEWS
April 19, 2003
For four weeks America's eyes have been squarely focused on Iraq, where sons and daughters, fathers and mothers, husbands and wives took on Saddam Hussein and successfully ousted the despotic ruler. Now the nation should turn its attention to Beijing, where scheduled talks next week will attempt to seek ways to deal with an increasingly belligerent North Korea. China must be thanked for getting us this far. After pulling out of the 1994 nuclear non-proliferation treaty in October, North Korea insisted that it would only negotiate with the United States.
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