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Nuclear Reactors

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NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Exelon Corp., which operates 20 percent of the nation's nuclear-power plants, including the reactors closest to Philadelphia, said Thursday that it anticipates U.S. regulators will launch a wide-scale review of the industry in the aftermath of Japan's unfolding nuclear catastrophe. John W. Rowe, Exelon's chairman and chief executive, told investors in a conference call that the company is confident of the safety of its 17 reactors at 11 sites. "I think there is nothing obvious to us that needs to be changed," Rowe said.
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the Number One Department Store, the counters feature cosmetics, toys, red plastic bowls, bolts of fabric and clothes - all made right here in Communist North Korea. The Rakwon Department Store has some foreign goods - cameras and photo equipment from Japan, for instance - but nothing from the United States or South Korea. The United States and South Korea are regarded as special enemies here. Their products have been banned - or at least, in the case of South Korean products, disguised as coming from another country.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2002 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Exelon Corp., the country's largest nuclear plant operator, said yesterday that it would end its bid to develop the next generation of nuclear reactors. The Chicago-based parent of Peco Energy Co. said it would terminate its nearly two-year relationship with Eskom, South Africa's state-owned utility, in building a prototype gas-cooled reactor. Exelon is getting out of the business of designing nuclear plants and will concentrate instead on operating them. The company spent $20 million on the project, of which it owned 12.5 percent.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One by one, nuclear reactors in this country are prematurely decaying, becoming corpses for the atomic graveyard well ahead of schedule. Major reactor components are becoming unsafe: Generator tubes are cracking, pipes are corroding and reactor vessels are becoming brittle, experts say. Rather than pay an enormous repair tab, plant owners are closing down their reactors well ahead of their 40-year life expectancy. By the end of the decade, as many as 25 of the 109 commercial nuclear reactors now percolating in the United States could cease operations permanently, including some of the nation's largest plants.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) is asking for a congressional investigation of whether evacuation planning has kept pace with population growth and increased power levels around nuclear power plants. Casey, chairman of the Senate Joint Economic Committee, requested an investigation by the Government Accountability Office, Congress' investigative arm. Casey posed similar questions to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which jointly oversee emergency planning at the nation's 104 commercial nuclear reactors.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
Nuclear plant is too dangerous It has been proved conclusively that when nuclear plants are closed, cancer rates in children drop dramatically. The study by the Radiation and Public Health Project checked children's baby teeth for radioactive strontium 90, which results only from nuclear-bomb explosions and nuclear reactors. This is why the Tooth Fairy Project, as the study is known, should continue to check children's baby teeth for strontium 90 and why the legislature should provide funding for this research.
NEWS
May 27, 1986
I completely agree with your editorial of May 13 that atomic energy is too risky. The decision of so many of the best and brightest minds in the utility industry that electric power from cheap nuclear energy was desirable must be challenged. The industry has never solved the problem that has existed from the beginning of how to dispose of nuclear wastes. Now we have the example of the Soviet accident to show how many more problems are created by a nuclear power plant accident.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | Associated Press
Though the chance is extremely remote, Pennsylvania nuclear reactors, including those near Lancaster and Beaver Creek, could be vulnerable to radiation leaks if their power were knocked out for days, an Associated Press investigation has found. The risk exists for all U.S. nuclear reactors if there are no other means to keep the reactors cool, but some are more susceptible than others, according to the AP investigation, conducted in the wake of radiation leaks at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The United States' reported bombing of two nuclear reactors in Iraq is not likely to cause serious environmental or health problems because the amount of uranium in them was probably small, three American nuclear experts said yesterday. And the bombing of the reactors at Tuwaitha, 15 miles southeast of Baghdad, may not have accomplished the U.S. goal of destroying Iraq's nuclear-weapons capability, they said, because the fuel may have been removed before the bombings. The experts also warned that the bombing - the first time operating nuclear reactors have been struck in wartime - established a dangerous precedent.
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | By Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer
What, if anything, can the United States do to guarantee that its neighbors build safe nuclear power plants? The Soviet Union, for example, is providing Cuba with two 440-megawatt pressurized water reactors in the city of Cienfuegos, on the southwestern side of the island, less than 200 miles from Key West, Fla. For the past several months, the United States has been trying politely to gain assurance from the Soviet Union that it will provide...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Matthew Daly, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Two years after the nuclear crisis in Japan, the top U.S. regulator says American nuclear power plants are safer than ever, though not trouble-free. A watchdog group calls that assessment overly rosy. "The performance is quite good," Nuclear Regulatory Commission chairman Allison Macfarlane said in an interview. All but five of the nation's 104 nuclear reactors were performing at acceptable safety levels at the end of 2012, Macfarlane said, citing a recent NRC report.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Yuri Kageyama, Associated Press
TOKYO - Thousands of people rallied in a Tokyo park Saturday, demanding an end to atomic power and vowing never to give up the fight, despite two years of little change after the nuclear disaster in northeastern Japan. Gathering two days ahead of the second anniversary of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that sent the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant into multiple meltdowns, demonstrators said they would never forget the world's worst nuclear catastrophe since Chernobyl, and expressed alarm over the government's eagerness to restart reactors.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. - The world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was retired from active service on Saturday, temporarily reducing the number of carriers in the U.S. fleet to 10 until 2015. The USS Enterprise ended its notable 51-year career during a ceremony at its home port at Naval Station Norfolk, where thousands of former crew members, ship builders and their families lined a pier to bid farewell to one of the most decorated ships in the Navy. "It'll be a special memory.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Brock Vergakis, Associated Press
ABOARD THE USS ENTERPRISE - The world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier ended its remarkable career at sea on Sunday when it pulled into its home port for the final time after participating in every major conflict since the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. The USS Enterprise began shutting down its eight nuclear reactors almost as soon as it arrived at its pier at Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia, where thousands of cheering family members and friends welcomed the ship home from its 25th and final deployment after nearly eight months at sea. The ship will never move on its own power again and will eventually be scrapped in Washington state.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Jane Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Oyster Creek nuclear power plant remains on "alert" status even as the rising waters that caused problems with the reactor's pumping system continue to abate, a spokesman for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Tuesday. Despite the "alert" status, which is the second least serious level, the reactor, located in Lacey Township, Ocean County, is considered "safe," he said. The Oyster Creek facility was impacted by the storm in three ways - rising water in intake canals affected pump performance in an intake structure; a power outage in the area also hit the plant, causing it to switch to back up generator to power the facility, and winds and weather took out 21 of about 50 warning sirens positioned in a 10-mile radius of the plant, said spokesman Neil Sheehan.
NEWS
September 2, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's sole operational nuclear power reactor has reached full capacity, a senior official said Saturday. Iran's deputy nuclear chief, Mohammad Ahmadian, said the reactor at the Bushehr power plant was brought to its "full capacity of 1,000 megawatts" Friday evening. The reactor went into operation for the first time last year at minimum capacity. The Islamic Republic built the nuclear power plant in the southern Iranian port city with Russian help. The facility is a cornerstone of Iran's drive to become a technological leader among Muslim nations, with efforts such as an ambitious space program and long-range missile development.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press
TOKYO - Nuclear power returned to Japan's energy mix for the first time in two months Thursday, hours before a parliamentary panel blamed the government's cozy relations with the industry for the meltdowns that prompted the mass shutdown of the nation's reactors. Though the report echoes other investigations into last year's disaster at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, it could fuel complaints that Japan is trying to restart nuclear reactors without doing enough to avoid a repeat.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Louise Nordstrom, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM - Sweden ramped up security at its three nuclear power plants Thursday after a small amount of explosives without a triggering device was found on a forklift on the grounds of the country's largest atomic power station, authorities said. Police were investigating possible sabotage, but insisted that even if there had been a blast it would not have posed any great danger. Bomb-sniffing dogs detected the explosives in a routine check Wednesday afternoon by security staff in the power plant's industrial area near its high-security enclosure.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press
TOKYO - The operator of the Japanese nuclear plant devastated by last year's tsunami issued a final report on the disaster Wednesday, outlining organizational and communication problems that have not yet been resolved. The report by Tokyo Electric Power Co. comes as Japan prepares to restart its first nuclear reactors since the March 11, 2011, disaster led to a prolonged shutdown of all of the country's atomic generating plants. Though many Japanese remain deeply concerned about the safety of nuclear power, the restarting raises operators' hopes that more reactors can resume operations.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
Scientists back restarting reactors June 11 (Bloomberg) - A panel of Japanese scientists reported that two nuclear reactors idled for safety checks were safe to operate, giving Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda the approval he needs to restart the units. In a meeting late Sunday that was moved to a new venue after antinuclear protests, the 12-member panel appointed by the governor of Fukui prefecture, where Kansai Electric Power Co.'s Ohi nuclear plant is located, ruled the plant can be operated safely, according to national broadcaster NHK. Noda, backed by businesses including Komatsu Ltd. and NEC Corp., said June 8 the nation needed to resume nuclear power generation to avoid blackouts and preserve quality of life.
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