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Nuclear Regulatory Commission

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BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Thursday ordered the owners of nearly a third of all U.S. nuclear reactors to add venting systems to their containment buildings to prevent the pressure-induced explosions that plagued the Fukushima reactors in Japan in 2011. The order pertains to 31 boiling-water reactors, including Exelon Corp.'s Limerick Generating Station, Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey; PPL Corp.'s Susquehanna Steam Generating Station, and PSEG Nuclear's Hope Creek Generating Station.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Tuesday it will devote additional oversight to Exelon Generation Co.'s Three Mile Island 1 reactor after finding inadequate flood protection of safety equipment at the Middletown facility.   The NRC said its inspectors last year discovered unprotected electrical conduits through which water could infiltrate the plant's safety equipment in the event of a severe flood. The deficiency was identified during one of the agency's post-Fukushima reviews of U.S. reactors.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
When it opened in 1969, the Oyster Creek Generation Station in South Jersey was the first nuclear power plant in the nation. On Tuesday, federal safety officials gave the Exelon-owned facility the green light to continue operating until 2029, pending final approval by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Opponents who sought to block the license renewal for the plant, including nearby residents, have every right to voice concern about a facility of Oyster Creek's age. But now that the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board has found it up to standard, even those who wish it were otherwise must admit that the facility is needed to keep people's lights on while lessening our dependence on fossil fuels that create greenhouse gas emissions.
NEWS
July 25, 1986
In a recent submission to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Philadelphia Electric Co. attorneys called for a reduction or removal of emergency planning standards from the nuclear licensing process. The basic premise of the article by Robert Rader from the law firm of Conner & Weidenmeyer suggests that plans for evacuation and other health and safety issues have no place before the NRC. He believes such issues represent a waste of time and money on the part of the utility company and the NRC. He states, "So much conjecture about latent cancer deaths, premised on an extremely improbable accident, is irrelevant to licensing and only whets the anti-nuclear penchant for scaremongering.
NEWS
April 10, 2006
Nuclear power plants must be able to repel a small group of terrorists, possibly working with an insider, but security rules don't require them to be ready for a rocket-propelled grenade or a large truck bomb. If attacked by air or a large force, they'll call in government backup, but they don't prepare through drills. Will more Americans have to die before that changes? The nuclear industry claims it has made great strides in security since 9/11, but a House hearing and audit last week found otherwise.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials of two steel parts companies pleaded guilty yesterday in federal court to participating in a scheme to illegally sell a lower grade of steel to power companies for use in nuclear reactors. Ealan J. Wingate, 38, of New York City, and Vernon E. Anderson, 59, of Short Hills, N.J., each pleaded guilty to one count of mail fraud and one count of conspiracy before U.S. District Judge Joseph S. Lord 3d. In addition, Pressure Piping Components Inc., created in 1984 by the merger of Midwood Industries Inc. and the Tube-Line Corp.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Salem I nuclear power plant, shut down since early April, was given the go-ahead last night by federal regulators to begin restarting the reactor, a plant spokesman said. Bill Stewart, spokesman for Public Service Electric & Gas Co. (PSE&G), the plant's operator, said the company was alerted mid-evening that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission had given its "concurrence" to the restart and that NRC inspectors would observe start-up operations. "This means we will be moving from cold shutdown to mode four, which is to say, making preparations, warming up the systems in the plant.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Two businessmen must spend three months in community centers for fraudulently selling $105,000 worth of inferior steel parts to suppliers for nuclear plants, a federal judge decided yesterday. "This is not ordinary steel. This is steel for a product in which defects carry with them the potential of great tragedy, great and far-reaching tragedy," Senior U.S. District Judge Joseph S. Lord III told the defendants. "This product was intended for use in nuclear plants. We have seen the tragic results of nuclear accidents, even when everything was considered perfect," the judge added.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1994 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Public Service Electric & Gas Co., criticized by federal regulators for unaggressively correcting problems at its nuclear reactors, announced yesterday that it had "reassigned" its chief nuclear officer and brought in an outsider to manage its reactors. The New Jersey utility said that Steven E. Miltenberger was given "other corporate responsibilities" and replaced by Leon R. Eliason, president of power supply at Northern States Power Co. in Minneapolis. Eliason will become PSE&G's chief nuclear officer and president of a new, separate nuclear business unit on Oct. 1. In announcing the shake-up, PSE&G chief executive E. James Ferland said that despite the utility's investment of "considerable capital and human resources" at the Salem Generating Station, "the pace of progress has been unsatisfactory.
NEWS
October 19, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The university labs weren't tested regularly for radiation. Some faculty members failed to check for leaks or take routine inventories of radioactive materials. And storage areas for the nuclear stuff weren't correctly marked. For such alleged violations, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission yesterday proposed to fine Drexel University $6,250. The latest problems, together with earlier violations found in 1991, "demonstrate that a significant breakdown in the control of licensed activities existed at your facility," said NRC Regional Administrator Thomas T. Martin in a letter to Drexel officials.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Thursday ordered the owners of nearly a third of all U.S. nuclear reactors to add venting systems to their containment buildings to prevent the pressure-induced explosions that plagued the Fukushima reactors in Japan in 2011. The order pertains to 31 boiling-water reactors, including Exelon Corp.'s Limerick Generating Station, Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey; PPL Corp.'s Susquehanna Steam Generating Station, and PSEG Nuclear's Hope Creek Generating Station.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Tuesday it will devote additional oversight to Exelon Generation Co.'s Three Mile Island 1 reactor after finding inadequate flood protection of safety equipment at the Middletown facility.   The NRC said its inspectors last year discovered unprotected electrical conduits through which water could infiltrate the plant's safety equipment in the event of a severe flood. The deficiency was identified during one of the agency's post-Fukushima reviews of U.S. reactors.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | Associated Press
A court decision issued Tuesday brings new uncertainty to whether nuclear materials on a Gloucester County site will be shipped to Utah or kept in place. The ruling from a federal appeals court in Washington sent the question back to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The commission ruled in 2011 that New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection would be in charge of the cleanup at the site in Newfield where Shieldalloy Metallurgical Corp. made metal alloys from 1955 until 1998.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Reese Palley
Bill Gates is among those who have invested heavily in efforts to get new nuclear energy technologies approved by U.S. regulators. The Microsoft cofounder's favored technology, a small, modular nuclear device known as a traveling wave reactor, is not only safe, but also cheaper to build and operate than the dangerous nuclear power technology the United States is currently invested in. Moreover, these reactors are designed to use existing nuclear...
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In April 1981, The Inquirer reported on an emergency exercise that Sydney W. Porter Jr. ran for the Salem Nuclear Generating Station in Lower Alloways Creek, N.J. "It was the first drill of such size to be conducted in the country," the story reported, "since the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) put new restrictions for emergency preparedness into effect" in the preceding week. In a foreshadowing of the March 11 tsunami's impact on the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plants in Japan, Mr. Porter said his 1981 exercise was meant to deal with "an incredibly unlikely scenario . . . sort of like having the Chicago fire, a tidal wave, and an earthquake happen all at once.
NEWS
March 15, 2011
THE THREAT of nuclear calamity in Japan should wake us up but good from the national fantasy that nuclear energy is a "clean, safe" answer to our energy demands. Following a second explosion yesterday at a reactor 150 miles north of Tokyo, Japanese engineers were working frantically to avoid a total meltdown - and with it, a massive release of radiation - into the environment. Japan is one of the most technologically advanced countries in the world. It had extensive emergency backups in place to deal with a nuclear accident.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2010 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With its options for growth in the U.S. constrained, Center City's Morgan, Lewis & Bockius L.L.P. is seeking to expand its nuclear-regulatory practice in Europe. The law firm has announced the hiring of a top energy attorney in London and has been meeting with government agencies and private-sector energy companies in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East to expand its nuclear practice, currently composed of 32 lawyers. The firm hopes to grow that by 20 percent within two years. Among Morgan's top European clients is EDF Energy, which selected Morgan to shepherd its application to build the United Kingdom's first new reactor in 20 years.
NEWS
February 26, 2010
President Obama is right to push nuclear power as a necessary ingredient to wean this nation from polluting fossil fuels that also keep it dependent on unpredictable foreign sources. However, it's going to take more than the loan guarantees Obama wants to give builders of new nuclear power plants to make his plan work. The question of where to dispose nuclear waste hasn't been answered. And just getting a loan doesn't ensure the cost-effectiveness of building an expensive nuclear power plant.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein and Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the first outside report on its flawed prostate-cancer program, the Philadelphia VA Medical Center was cited for eight apparent violations in using radioactive materials on nearly 100 veterans, federal inspectors have concluded. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission found that the Philadelphia VA staff failed to evaluate radiation doses or know when to report a mistake, according to the 16-page report obtained yesterday by The Inquirer. The brachytherapy team, for example, failed to check radiation doses for more than a year because a computer was unplugged from the hospital's network, the report said.
NEWS
August 12, 2009 | By Peter Crane
When news broke of the bungled radiation treatments given to prostate cancer patients at the Philadelphia VA hospital, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was quick to deflect responsibility. The agency said it learned of the problems only in May 2008 and then moved "aggressively and decisively" to correct them. The Department of Veterans Affairs took a similar line. Testifying before a Senate committee in June, acting VA Undersecretary for Health Gerald Cross expressed regret that "this problem went undetected for nearly six years.
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