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Nuclear Tests

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NEWS
May 29, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Pakistan said yesterday that it had conducted five underground nuclear tests, accelerating a nuclear arms race in South Asia, further undermining worldwide efforts to curb weapons of mass destruction, and triggering a swift American response. Pakistan further raised the stakes on the tense subcontinent by announcing that it intended to cap its arsenal of Ghauri missiles with nuclear warheads. With a range of 900 miles, the missiles are capable of striking most cities in India. Following the announcement here, President Clinton quickly punished the Pakistanis by imposing broad economic sanctions, and urged India and Pakistan to halt further testing to avert a dangerous arms race.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | By Itty Abraham
As we puzzle through the implications of the Indian nuclear tests, we find uncanny similarities between the first test in 1974 and the most recent explosions. The first is the world's surprise. When U.S. spy satellites discovered suspicious activity in the Pokaran testing range in December 1995, the Clinton administration made it clear to India that a nuclear test would be taken very seriously. The Indian government backed down. This reaffirmed the idea that U.S. satellite technology had world nuclear proliferation well in hand.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Jodi Enda and Richard Parker, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Clinton administration punished India yesterday for setting off a series of nuclear explosions this week, but still found itself struggling to contain what Defense Secretary William S. Cohen called a possible "chain reaction" of nuclear tests in Asia. In Potsdam, Germany, for the beginning of a six-day European tour, President Clinton announced a tough package of economic sanctions against India, including cutting off nearly all U.S. aid, ending U.S. bank loans, and pledging to oppose loans from international institutions, all totaling about $21 billion.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton yesterday endorsed a permanent end to nuclear test explosions, reversing long-standing Cold War policy and overruling some senior advisers who advocated continuing small underground blasts and tiny laboratory tests. "This is an historic milestone in our efforts to reduce the nuclear threat, to build a safer world," Clinton said at a press briefing at which he said he would "negotiate a true, zero-yield, comprehensive test ban. " The move, which has been discussed and always rejected by U.S. and other world leaders over the last three decades, is designed to make it difficult for any nation to design, develop or improve nuclear weapons.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Richard Parker and David Hess in Washington contributed to this report
As they searched for a way to dissuade Pakistan from testing nuclear weapons and setting off an arms race, White House officials acknowledged yesterday that they were working against difficult, perhaps insurmountable, odds. President Clinton said he does not consider Pakistani nuclear tests to be inevitable. But he and his aides said it would be extremely difficult for that nation's leaders to resist domestic pressure to test in the aftermath of five underground explosions set off by neighboring India this week.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Amid reports that Pakistan had already decided to test nuclear weapons, White House officials said yesterday that they knew of no "magic solutions" to forestall what they feared could be an escalating arms race. Reporting here on his meeting last week with officials in Islamabad, the Pakistani capital, Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott said: "They made quite clear that they didn't think there was any magic wand to be waved here, that the international community or the United States could do something that would make the problem that the Indian test has created for them go away.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | By ROBERT K. MUSIL
President Clinton must decide shortly whether to break a historic nine- month-long moratorium on nuclear-weapons testing. This decision comes exactly 30 years after Clinton's political hero, John F. Kennedy, ended U.S. open-air nuclear testing, called for peace with the Russians, urged a comprehensive test ban and by Aug. 5, 1963, had signed the world's first nuclear arms control treaty. That agreement - the Limited Test Ban Treaty - is JFK's most lasting achievement. Kennedy faced tremendous opposition, however, in his efforts to move a comprehensive test ban forward.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than 24 hours before Pakistan conducted its first nuclear test last week, Pakistani diplomats in the United States accused Israel of planning a preemptive strike to destroy its nuclear capability. The accusation triggered a flurry of diplomatic activity the afternoon of May 27 as the Pakistani ambassador to the United Nations called U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to say Pakistan feared an imminent air strike. Through intermediaries, Israel's U.N. envoy relayed an unequivocal denial.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | By Trudy Rubin
Suddenly, America has a new international enemy. It's not Saddam or the mullahs. It's not a dictatorship or a rogue state. The new public enemy number one - to judge from media commentary - is the world's largest democracy: India. Or, as President Bush's former national security adviser, Brent Scowcroft, calls it, "the world's most dangerous democracy. " These labels are a case of angry emotions drowning out common sense. India's crime is that its Hindu nationalist government just conducted five nuclear tests, threatening to destroy U.S. and global efforts to halt the spread of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | By Mark Thompson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush faces a tough decision on a bill Congress sent to him yesterday: Approve it and keep thousands of workers busy on an $8 billion science project in vote-rich Texas; veto it and kill a nuclear-test ban vigorously opposed by the Pentagon. All indications are that Bush, in the electoral fight of his life, will sign the bill, ignoring Pentagon contentions that the test ban will hurt U.S. security. The bill will send $517 million to Texas for the superconducting supercollider.
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NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE CONTROVERSIAL parcel of land for which the Nutter administration wants to pay more than $7.2 million was once the site of a scrap-metal firm that dismantled a ship exposed to atomic-bomb tests in the Marshall Islands after World War II, the Daily News has learned. The USS Niagara, a wartime naval-transport ship, in July 1946 became a "target ship" in Operation Crossroads, in which the U.S. conducted atomic-bomb tests "using nuclear devices very similar to the one dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945," according to a document obtained from the U.S. Defense Department's Defense Threat Reduction Agency.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
UNITED NATIONS - The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Thursday for tough new sanctions to punish North Korea for its latest nuclear test, and a furious Pyongyang threatened a nuclear strike against the United States. The sanctions drafted by North Korea's closest ally, China, and the United States send a powerful message that the international community condemns Pyongyang's ballistic missile and nuclear tests - and repeated violations of Security Council resolutions. "Adoption of the resolution itself is not enough," China's U.N. Ambassador Li Baodong said.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Anne Gearan, Washington Post
The North Korean underground nuclear test confirmed by U.S. intelligence agencies Tuesday served as a stark reminder that the unpredictable, largely inscrutable government remains a wild card for President Obama's second term - a nuclear threat to U.S. allies in Asia and a potential arms merchant to the highest bidder. The timing of the nuclear test was interpreted in Washington as an attempt by North Korea's young new leader to upstage Obama before his State of the Union address. And the claim that it involved a smaller, lighter device - an important element of any deliverable weapon - suggested that the demonstration could be the most dangerous yet by Pyongyang.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Matthew Pennington, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Satellite imagery indicates North Korea has been testing rocket engines, a sign that it continues to develop its long-range ballistic missiles, a U.S. academic institute said Monday. The analysis provided to the Associated Press is based on satellite images taken as recently as late September of the Sohae site on the secretive country's northwest coast. In April, the North launched a rocket from there in a failed attempt to propel a satellite into space in defiance of a U.N. ban. The analysis on the website of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, which is called "38 North," said it remains unclear whether the North is preparing another rocket launch but predicted it may embark on rocket and nuclear tests in the first half of 2013.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Malou Innocent ?and Doug Bandow
At the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul this week, two states were notably absent: Iran and North Korea. As international pariahs under heavy sanctions, the two countries have much in common but one important difference: North Korea possesses nuclear weapons, while Iran does not. Washington must learn from its errors in handling North Korea to keep Iran from following the same course. It must engage Tehran to bring it back from the brink and into the international community. Since 9/11, the United States has attacked Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Libya.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | Associated Press
VIENNA - North Korea has invited the International Atomic Energy Agency to return, three years after expelling its nuclear monitors, the agency said Monday. The United States said such a move would be welcome but remained critical of the North's missile test plans. Without disclosing the North's terms, IAEA spokeswoman Gill Tudor said it received the invitation on Friday. That was the same day that Pyongyang announced it planned to test a missile by launching a satellite, a move that Washington has suggested could jeopardize a nuclear moratorium deal reached with the United States last month.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Nasser Karimi, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran on Tuesday rejected allegations that it attempted to clean up radioactive traces possibly left by secret nuclear work at a key military site before granting U.N. inspectors permission to visit the facility. Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast told reporters in Tehran that the allegations were misleading and false, and insisted that such traces could not be cleaned up. Satellite images of Iran's Parchin military facility that circulated last week appeared to show trucks and earthmoving vehicles at the location.
NEWS
February 26, 2012
N. Korea: No U.S. nuclear monopoly SEOUL, South Korea - North Korea said Saturday that "nuclear weapons are not the monopoly of the United States," a day after a U.S. special envoy reported after two days of talks with North Korean officials that there had been no change in their negotiating style on nuclear programs under its new leadership. "The U.S. is sadly mistaken if it thinks it is safe as its mainland is far away across the ocean," said officials in North Korea, which has conducted two nuclear tests since 2006 and has been developing intercontinental ballistic missiles.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
VIENNA, Austria - An article on a Revolutionary Guard website praising the idea of Iran testing a nuclear bomb is raising alarms in Western intelligence circles, which interpret it as evidence of strong backing in the Islamic Republic for such a move. Titled "The Day After the First Iranian Nuclear Test - a Normal Day," the article coincides with other public or suspected activities that the United States and its allies see as indications that Tehran wants to possess atomic arms. "The day after the first Iranian nuclear test for us Iranians will be an ordinary day, but in the eyes of many of us, it will have a new shine, from the power and dignity of the nation," says the article published on the Gerdab site run by the Revolutionary Guard.
NEWS
November 17, 2002 | By Dan Stober and Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Bush administration is laying the groundwork for the resumption of nuclear testing and the development of new nuclear weapons, according to a recent memo. The memorandum circulated to members of the Nuclear Weapons Council, a high-level government body that sets policy for nuclear weapons, urges the U.S. nuclear-weapons laboratories to assess the technical risks associated with maintaining the U.S. arsenal without nuclear testing, which President Bush's father halted in 1992.
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