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Nuclear Tests

NEWS
September 7, 2001 | By Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The civilian leadership of the Pentagon wants the United States to boycott a U.N. conference later this month on accelerating a global ban on nuclear test explosions, senior administration officials said yesterday. These Defense Department officials want to kill any chance for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty to take effect, an official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. The State Department, however, is pushing to send a "fairly junior" U.S. diplomat to the conference to air U.S. objections to the treaty, the official said.
NEWS
July 2, 2001 | By Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Bush administration has asked U.S. nuclear-weapons scientists to examine ways that nuclear-test explosions beneath the Nevada desert could resume more quickly if the government decides to end a nine-year moratorium on nuclear testing. It would now take one to three years to prepare a test, and a recent study concluded that such long lead times could allow political opponents to block any resumption of nuclear testing. Nuclear-weapons scientists are looking at "what it would take to do various kinds of tests on various time scales," C. Bruce Tarter, the director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, said in an interview with the Inquirer Washington Bureau.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | By Jonathan S. Landay, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For the United States, the military coup in Pakistan raises fresh worries about the world's newest nuclear rivalry and underscores the limitations of its influence in the tumultuous South Asia region. The United States has long had close political and military ties to Pakistan. Despite that, the Pakistani military ignored Washington's recent warnings against launching a coup, the country's third since it won independence from Britain in 1947. The public warnings were a rare step for the Clinton administration and underscore its deep concern about stability in Pakistan and control of that nation's nuclear weapons.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Christopher Marquis, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate leaders from both parties backed away last night from a high-stakes showdown over the global nuclear test-ban treaty, all but dooming the unratified pact to languish for another year. President Clinton, who cranked up a vast publicity effort this week on behalf of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, has not succeeded in mustering enough votes for its approval, but he has raised its profile enough to make it politically costly for some Republicans to oppose. The treaty, which has already been signed by 150 nations, would prohibit nuclear tests worldwide and establish a vast monitoring regime to detect violations.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a gamble that could reverberate around the globe, Senate Democrats yesterday began readying themselves for a debate and an early vote - which they are almost certain to lose - on a long-delayed treaty to ban the testing of nuclear weapons. The treaty's proponents argue that banning nuclear testing is crucial to halting the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Senate Republicans, led by Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi and Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms of North Carolina, argue that the treaty would jeopardize America's nuclear superiority and prevent the United States from modernizing and maintaining its arsenal.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | By Geneva Overholser
Do you have friends or family in North Carolina or Mississippi? Then do yourself - do all of us - a favor. Beg them to call Jesse Helms and Trent Lott and demand an end to their outrageous refusal to allow Senate consideration of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Mississippi's Lott, the Senate majority leader, and North Carolina's Helms, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, are peevishly, recklessly and - most of all - dangerously bottling up the ban on nuclear weapons testing that, by all logic, the Senate should be ratifying.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
India's 13-month-old Hindu nationalist government collapsed yesterday, raising concerns about the country's economy and efforts to end the nation's nuclear arms race with Pakistan. The collapse paves the way for India's sixth prime minister change since 1996. If opposition parties fail to form a government, new elections could be called four years ahead of schedule. The ruling Bharatiya Janata Party lost a confidence vote, 270-269, after key allies deserted it and formed a partnership with the opposition Congress Party led by Italian-born Sonia Gandhi.
NEWS
December 16, 1998 | By Don Harrison
Monkeys scamper over the walls and grounds of dingy, decaying government buildings in the heart of New Delhi. "Ours is the only foreign office in the world where the monkeys are on the outside," quipped a ministry official. We were 11 Americans and a Norwegian on a fact-finding trip sponsored by the National Conference of Editorial Writers. Except for a weekend of sightseeing through Rajasthan state from Jaipur to Agra, we followed a relentless schedule of meetings with politicians, educators, activists, do-gooders and local journalists in Delhi and Mumbai (formerly Bombay)
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | By John Donnelly, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
On frosted grass in front of the University of Virginia's Rotunda building, anxious school officials gathered eight Nobel Peace Prize winners for an extraordinary photograph yesterday at the start of a conference on peace and forgiveness. But His Holiness the Dalai Lama, wrapped mummylike in his red robe, had his own plans. He guided Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa to a rocking chair. As Tutu sat down, the Dalai Lama rocked it so hard that the archbishop nearly fell off. Then the Buddhist holy man pushed Tutu's black cap over his eyes.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | By Richard Parker, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The hands of the Doomsday Clock, the ultimate symbol of nuclear peril, were moved five minutes closer to midnight yesterday, reflecting increasingly frustrated efforts to rein in the world's nuclear weapons. The clock in Chicago is now set at 11:51 p.m., the most dangerous setting since 1988, when nuclear doomsday was just six minutes away. Kept by the directors of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, a bimonthly journal of the University of Chicago, the clock has been used since 1947 to gauge how close the world is to nuclear destruction.
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