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Nuclear Weapons

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NEWS
February 1, 2005
NO ONE should be surprised that the Bush administration may use military force to stop Iran's nuclear capability. Bush, a born-again Christian, informed these anti-Christian nations of the world that they would feel his wrath if they produce any weapons of mass destruction. President Truman, also a Christian, responsible for dropping the bomb that claimed more than 100,000 lives in Nagasaki alone, "thanked God for giving the United States the atomic bomb . . . " Truman was also ready to use the A-bomb on communist North Korea.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | By Jonathan Power
If the protests, disturbances, negative polls, critical political commentary and immense press coverage of the French nuclear tests at Mururoa atoll in the South Pacific have proved anything, they've demonstrated that a nerve has been touched - people of many beliefs, from a wide variety of cultures and politics, have concluded that nuclear bombs are no longer the weapon of choice. Nuclear patriotism, French style, seems to be the last refuge of the scoundrel. Nuclear possession by anyone, even the superpowers, is now up for serious question.
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | By Jim Walsh
Fifty-five years ago this week, America dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. So began the nuclear age. It hasn't gone as the experts predicted. There have been no "limited" nuclear wars, and although nine nations did eventually acquire nuclear weapons, an additional 20 countries started down the nuclear path only to stop and reverse course. Today, the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), the cornerstone of international efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons, has more members than the United Nations.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze surprised the United States and its allies yesterday by announcing that the Soviet Union was planning to withdraw 1,500 nuclear warheads and other short-range weapons from Central Europe by the end of the year. Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d welcomed the Soviet announcement, but asked whether it was really new. "We don't know whether the weapons to be removed were going to be removed in any event as a consequence of troop reductions that have already been announced," Baker said.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The risk that nuclear weapons will spread to more countries is acute, especially in Pakistan and the Middle East, and a superpower arms race is increasing the danger of nuclear proliferation, a report by U.S. and European arms control experts released yesterday concluded. The report, published by the private Council on Foreign Relations, said punitive sanctions against countries thought to be seeking nuclear arms were largely ineffective. It said intense U.S. and Soviet arms control efforts and international attempts to defuse regional crises would be more effective at containing the spread of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
December 6, 2007 | By Claudia Rosett
There's lots to wonder about in the Key Judgments of the latest National Intelligence Estimate, which informs us with "high confidence" that Iran halted its nuclear bomb program four years ago. This contradicts its 2005 warning that Iran was "determined to develop nuclear weapons. " That followed the 2003-2004 zig-zag from our intelligence community on Iraq and Saddam Hussein's interest in weapons of mass destruction; which followed the intelligence failure to zero in on the Sept. 11, 2001, hijackers before they slammed airplanes into the Twin Towers, the Pentagon, and a field in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 21, 2001
Now the hands reaching for [nuclear] weapons are those of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda.. . . What can we do to reduce the threat? First, we should help Russia strengthen its protection of nuclear materials and enable its weapons scientists to convert to civilian work. We can help Pakistan develop technology needed to guard against the theft or unauthorized use of its nuclear weapons. Second, the U.S. administration should recommit itself to multinational efforts to control and limit the spread of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal jury starts deliberating today in the trial of a retired Pakistani general accused of conspiring to violate U.S. export laws to obtain nuclear-weapons-grade metal from a Reading company. The jurors hearing the case against Inam Ul-Haq were sent home yesterday afternoon after closing arguments from lawyers for the government and defense and instructions in the law from U.S. District Judge James T. Giles. Ul-Haq, 63, who did not testify and presented no evidence during the trial, which began June 29, is charged with conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government and one count of making false statements to a government agency.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
NATO's defense ministers agreed yesterday that there was less need now for short-range nuclear systems in Western Europe, but they did not reach a consensus on which weapons should be withdrawn and which should remain. The NATO ministers noted in a joint communique that "profound changes" have occurred in Eastern Europe, justifying the comprehensive review of Western defense strategy that President Bush requested last week. They also agreed to hold a meeting of North Atlantic Treaty Organization leaders in London on July 5-6 to determine the precise aim of new arms negotiations with the Soviet Union on tactical nuclear forces.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | By Jonathan Power
India is now engaged in an all-out catch-up game with China for who will end up as the dominant power in Asia. Economic competition is the weapon of choice for day-to-day affairs - and India now looks as if it has a good chance of overtaking China in the early decades of the next century. But nuclear weapons are what the game could be about, if they continue to be the currency of power, despite the end of the Cold War. That is all the more so if post-Deng Xiaoping China becomes more assertive and militaristic - and all the indications are that it will be. (If China continues to build up its nuclear armory at its present rate, it will reach parity with the United States in 30 years.
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NEWS
July 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The seven-nation agreement aimed at halting Iran's progress toward a nuclear arsenal has been criticized as merely delaying the inevitable, but that ignores the value of delay. Delay can buy valuable time to shape relationships and make better deals that might prevent the apparently inevitable from ever happening. Ultimately, the success of the pact won't be decided by those who negotiated it or the leaders of the countries they represented. It will be decided by the people of Iran, who have endured years of economic sanctions imposed on their repressive regime to reach this point.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Pub theater is a venerable tradition in the United Kingdom, with a drinking establishment downstairs and a small theater upstairs. Fergie's Pub is providing such a venue locally for Inis Nua's "second helping," a final show - presented as part of the Tiny Dynamite series A Play, a Pie & a Pint - tacked onto the company's main season. David Greig's The Letter of Last Resort is a little play - merely half an hour - about a big idea. Greig is the Scottish playwright who wrote the lovely Midsummer [a play with songs ]
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | BY JOHN M. CRISP
  IN HIS SPEECH to Congress on Wednesday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu summoned historical and literary resources to support a hard line in the negotiations with Iran over nuclear weapons. Netanyahu turned first to the ancient Biblical story of Esther, the young Jewish queen of Persia, who, with the help of her uncle Mordecai, foiled a plot to kill all the Jews. Scholars disagree on the historical standing of this story, but last week Jews worldwide celebrated Purim in commemoration of Esther, and Netanyahu was able to claim, 2,500 years later, that Esther had saved her people from "yet another Persian potentate.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.), who has frequently and forcefully clashed with President Obama over Iran policy, gave the administration some breathing room Tuesday. Menendez, the leading Democratic advocate for tougher economic sanctions on Iran, said that he and nine fellow Democrats would not vote for any new measures until at least March 24, heeding Obama's call to allow his administration time to negotiate a deal that prevents Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Pakistanis, and sympathizers the world over, are mourning the Taliban's horrific massacre of at least 132 schoolchildren and 13 staff in a crowded school in Peshawar. On the surface, this obscene assault - in which the Pakistani Taliban hunted down children cowering under desks and burned a teacher to death - seems to have stiffened the backbones of Pakistan's politicians, who have long waffled about confronting the country's radical Islamists. After the attack, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif swore to eradicate terrorism from the country.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
While both the U.S. and the European Union have begun to ratchet up economic sanctions on Russian banks and other interests following the July 17 downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine, the reaction of the Russian government so far has been muted, a panel of Dechert L.L.P. lawyers said in a conference call Thursday. Thus, the potential for a sharply escalating trade war apparently has been averted - at least for now. The conflict between the U.S. and European governments and Russia over Russian support for separatist rebels in Ukraine already has had damaging consequences for the Russian economy, said Dechert partner Laura Brank, and concern by the Russians over further harm from western sanctions has tended to weigh against retaliation.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Hamid Aboutalebi looked like the ideal candidate to become Tehran's ambassador to the United Nations. He speaks fluent English and French, has served as ambassador to Italy, Australia, Belgium, and the European Union, and - in an ecumenical twist - got his Ph.D. from a Catholic university. There was only one catch. As a 22-year-old, he occasionally served as an interpreter for the students who took U.S. embassy staff hostage in Tehran in 1979. That ordeal remains so vivid in Washington memory that Congress voted unanimously to deny him a visa.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
What a leader does Defending President Obama's foreign policy on the grounds that he is following the will of the people ignores many lessons of history ("Public supports Obama's caution," Jan. 14). These lessons tell us that the president must see beyond what most of us want and then lead. For instance, Pearl Harbor finally forced an isolationist public to see that we had to go to war with Hitler. Harry Truman's decision to use nuclear weapons on Japan was primarily a product of simple addition, which told him that many thousands of American lives would be saved, and possibly many Japanese.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When President Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani spoke at the United Nations on Tuesday, each used a phrase that is key to any nuclear deal. "The age of zero-sum games is over," Rouhani declared. "This is not a zero-sum endeavor," said Obama (referring to prospects for a deal on Syria, but implying the same approach toward the nuclear issue). The phrase zero-sum game , loosely interpreted, means that for me to win, you must lose. There is no middle ground. But getting beyond zero-sum politics requires a minimum level of trust, or an ability to verify what the other side has promised.
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