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Nuclear Weapons

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NEWS
February 1, 2005
NO ONE should be surprised that the Bush administration may use military force to stop Iran's nuclear capability. Bush, a born-again Christian, informed these anti-Christian nations of the world that they would feel his wrath if they produce any weapons of mass destruction. President Truman, also a Christian, responsible for dropping the bomb that claimed more than 100,000 lives in Nagasaki alone, "thanked God for giving the United States the atomic bomb . . . " Truman was also ready to use the A-bomb on communist North Korea.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Emma Ashford
Donald Trump has finally given us greater insight into his approach to foreign policy. Last week, he not only conducted interviews with the Washington Post and New York Times, but revealed his long-promised list of foreign policy advisers, and addressed the annual AIPAC conference. His remarks led some to note that a restrained or realist worldview was implicit in Trump's statements. Unfortunately, for those who seek a more restrained foreign policy, there is little reason to celebrate.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | By Jonathan Power
If the protests, disturbances, negative polls, critical political commentary and immense press coverage of the French nuclear tests at Mururoa atoll in the South Pacific have proved anything, they've demonstrated that a nerve has been touched - people of many beliefs, from a wide variety of cultures and politics, have concluded that nuclear bombs are no longer the weapon of choice. Nuclear patriotism, French style, seems to be the last refuge of the scoundrel. Nuclear possession by anyone, even the superpowers, is now up for serious question.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA Get serious about abolishing nuclear weapons "We must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without" nuclear weapons, President Obama's said during his moving visit to Hiroshima, site of the world's first use of such a bomb against a city ("Death fell from the sky," Saturday). Those words echoed his Prague declaration, in which he called for nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation, leading to a Nobel Peace Prize. Obama's visit to Hiroshima was a noble gesture, but the logic of his words - and of our times - demands that we begin the process of serious negotiations to abolish nuclear weapons so that never again can a Hiroshima happen anywhere on Earth.
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | By Jim Walsh
Fifty-five years ago this week, America dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. So began the nuclear age. It hasn't gone as the experts predicted. There have been no "limited" nuclear wars, and although nine nations did eventually acquire nuclear weapons, an additional 20 countries started down the nuclear path only to stop and reverse course. Today, the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), the cornerstone of international efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons, has more members than the United Nations.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze surprised the United States and its allies yesterday by announcing that the Soviet Union was planning to withdraw 1,500 nuclear warheads and other short-range weapons from Central Europe by the end of the year. Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d welcomed the Soviet announcement, but asked whether it was really new. "We don't know whether the weapons to be removed were going to be removed in any event as a consequence of troop reductions that have already been announced," Baker said.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The risk that nuclear weapons will spread to more countries is acute, especially in Pakistan and the Middle East, and a superpower arms race is increasing the danger of nuclear proliferation, a report by U.S. and European arms control experts released yesterday concluded. The report, published by the private Council on Foreign Relations, said punitive sanctions against countries thought to be seeking nuclear arms were largely ineffective. It said intense U.S. and Soviet arms control efforts and international attempts to defuse regional crises would be more effective at containing the spread of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
December 6, 2007 | By Claudia Rosett
There's lots to wonder about in the Key Judgments of the latest National Intelligence Estimate, which informs us with "high confidence" that Iran halted its nuclear bomb program four years ago. This contradicts its 2005 warning that Iran was "determined to develop nuclear weapons. " That followed the 2003-2004 zig-zag from our intelligence community on Iraq and Saddam Hussein's interest in weapons of mass destruction; which followed the intelligence failure to zero in on the Sept. 11, 2001, hijackers before they slammed airplanes into the Twin Towers, the Pentagon, and a field in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 21, 2001
Now the hands reaching for [nuclear] weapons are those of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda.. . . What can we do to reduce the threat? First, we should help Russia strengthen its protection of nuclear materials and enable its weapons scientists to convert to civilian work. We can help Pakistan develop technology needed to guard against the theft or unauthorized use of its nuclear weapons. Second, the U.S. administration should recommit itself to multinational efforts to control and limit the spread of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal jury starts deliberating today in the trial of a retired Pakistani general accused of conspiring to violate U.S. export laws to obtain nuclear-weapons-grade metal from a Reading company. The jurors hearing the case against Inam Ul-Haq were sent home yesterday afternoon after closing arguments from lawyers for the government and defense and instructions in the law from U.S. District Judge James T. Giles. Ul-Haq, 63, who did not testify and presented no evidence during the trial, which began June 29, is charged with conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government and one count of making false statements to a government agency.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016
By Tom Ridge Last week, Iran's Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei accused the United States of failing to honor pledges in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). Citing "the futility of negotiations with the Americans," he distanced himself from the nuclear deal he once supported. Coming just weeks after the one-year anniversary of the agreement, his charge is just another in an escalating war of words from Tehran that remind the world that the "era of good feelings" promised by U.S. negotiators never came to pass.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA Get serious about abolishing nuclear weapons "We must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without" nuclear weapons, President Obama's said during his moving visit to Hiroshima, site of the world's first use of such a bomb against a city ("Death fell from the sky," Saturday). Those words echoed his Prague declaration, in which he called for nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation, leading to a Nobel Peace Prize. Obama's visit to Hiroshima was a noble gesture, but the logic of his words - and of our times - demands that we begin the process of serious negotiations to abolish nuclear weapons so that never again can a Hiroshima happen anywhere on Earth.
NEWS
May 28, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Law over Norcross I just voted by mail for Alex Law to be the Democratic nominee for Congress in New Jersey's First District because he will be stronger on the environment and nuclear nonproliferation. As a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and retired Navy captain who is concerned about the safety of our country, I am especially dismayed at the lack of political courage of the incumbent, Rep. Donald Norcross, to support the international nuclear deal with Iran - an agreement overwhelmingly supported by apolitical experts who monitor compliance.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA Lower the nuclear threat I welcome President Obama's decision to be the first sitting U.S. president in the nuclear age to visit Hiroshima, the site of the first use of nuclear weapons ("Obama to make history with visit to Hiroshima," Wednesday). Remembering the horror and destruction wreaked by a relatively small nuclear weapon compared with today's nuclear weapons is crucial to generating the global will to move toward abolishing such weapons worldwide. The last nuclear reduction treaty was in 2010, between the United States and Russia.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA At ground zero, plot the end of nukes President Obama's visit to Japan will show how far we've come since World War II ("Obama to make history with visit to Hiroshima," Wednesday). Japan is the leading U.S. ally in East Asia. The visit will provide an opportunity to begin to chart the future beyond nuclear weapons. Just as the United States was first to develop nuclear arms, we should take the lead toward a world free of this menace. Obama has reduced the nuclear threat with the START deal with Russia, cutting weapons equally, and the Iran deal, removing most of that country's uranium fuel.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
Republican front-runner Donald Trump strengthens the Islamic State with his calls to torture terrorist suspects and proposals to prevent Muslims from entering the United States, Hillary Clinton charged Monday. "His comments are actually used by terrorist groups to recruit," Clinton said in a conference call with the Inquirer Editorial Board and reporters. She said that Trump needs to be "rejected and repudiated at every turn. " As president, Trump would make the world more dangerous, Clinton said, citing his suggestions that NATO be broken up and that Japan and South Korea be allowed to obtain nuclear weapons to defend themselves.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Emma Ashford
Donald Trump has finally given us greater insight into his approach to foreign policy. Last week, he not only conducted interviews with the Washington Post and New York Times, but revealed his long-promised list of foreign policy advisers, and addressed the annual AIPAC conference. His remarks led some to note that a restrained or realist worldview was implicit in Trump's statements. Unfortunately, for those who seek a more restrained foreign policy, there is little reason to celebrate.
NEWS
January 6, 2016
By Pat Toomey and Tom Ridge On Dec. 16, Secretary of State John Kerry certified to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that Iran is in full compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and that the "suspension of sanctions related to Iran pursuant to the agreement is appropriate . . . and is vital to the national security interests of the United States. " If this delusion results in the imminent lifting of sanctions, Iran will gain immediate access to more than $100 billion; the sanctions regime will be effectively over; and the only incentive for Iran even to pretend to comply with the agreement will be gone.
NEWS
January 2, 2016
By Chuck Bauerlein My maternal grandfather died a few years before I was born, so I never got a chance to ask him why he brought his 16-year-old daughter with him to the city hospital that day in 1944 to help look for her missing brother and sister. The Americans had been running bombing raids over Holland, strafing Nazi forces with cluster bombs in an attempt to drive them back to Germany. My aunt and uncle had gone into town to do some shopping. When they didn't return after an hour or so, my grandfather and my mother went to find them.
NEWS
September 5, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It's too bad the clear, cogent argument Sen. Bob Casey made for his decision to support the Iran nuclear accord couldn't be aired prominently to counter deceptive television commercials opposing the deal. One ad sponsored by the International Fellowship of Christian and Jews depicts presumably American children playing in their backyard just before an Iranian bomb strikes. As Casey (D., Pa.) acknowledged in an 8,000-word memo accompanying his announcement of support for the deal Tuesday, it is a risk to trust Iran to abide by the deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.
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