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Nueva Esperanza

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NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The National Association of Home Builders and Nueva Esperanza have joined forces to build housing on land owned by the Hispanic faith-based community-development organization in several areas of the country, including Pennsylvania and South Jersey. The partnership, which also includes the Federal Home Loan Bank Board in Pittsburgh and Lowe's Cos. Inc., was created as part of the Bush administration's "Blueprint for the American Dream" program to increase minority homeownership by 5.5 million before the end of the decade.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A North Philadelphia community development agency has bought a 150-acre site in North Coventry that will serve as a conference-retreat center and a campground for urban children. Nueva Esperanza ("new hope" in Spanish), a service agency that provides an array of health, job training and housing services in North Philadelphia, bought the former Fernbrook campground last month from the Southeast Conference of the United Church of Christ for $500,000. The agency will offer the property for rent to organizations as a conference location and will begin a children's summer camp, which will hold its first session starting July 13. The Nueva Esperanza Conference and Retreat Center will offer a camp to 300 children over the course of six weeks.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
For the city and neighbors in the largely Hispanic West Kensington area of North Philadelphia, it means one less vacant lot to worry about. For Angel Melendez it means a steady job with a chance to provide for his wife and three children. And for 20 lucky families it will mean a home to call their own. Two Latino civic organizations are joining forces to build 20 townhouses on a city-owned lot at Mascher and York streets, in one of the city's poorest and most blighted neighborhoods.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
You're a poor Latino. You can't find a job because you're unskilled. Your kids talk about dropping out of school. Your rowhouse is falling apart and you don't have the money to fix it. That's life for most of the poor, decent people in Hispanic North Philadelphia: No money. No job. No hope. But that's slowly changing. "If the city can't help them, Latinos are going to help themselves," says the Rev. Luis Cortes, executive director of the Hispanic Clergy and Nueva Esperanza, their community development corporation.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, the area's Spanish-speaking community has been served by a host of small community and faith-based groups that view their efforts as a mission. A pastor would provide translation help during interviews. A church member might offer someone a daily ride to work. The food cupboard would fill in the gap when payday was a week away. Many of those efforts have been informal and one-on-one, without the management underpinnings that could transform them into programs eligible for federal grants.
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rev. Luis Cortez is on a mission. It's a mission borne of activism, fueled by divine inspiration and set in motion by an ecclesiastical desire for justice. Cortez is executive director of the Hispanic Clergy of Philadelphia and Nueva Esperanza, a non-profit, community development group, which is based in the First Spanish Baptist Church at York and Hancock streets, the heart of a predominately poor and seemingly forgotten Latino area of the city. Dark-haired and beared with a slight paunch, Cortez is part hustler, part politician, but all the way Christian.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
He's part hustler, part pit bull and all dreamer. The Rev. Luis Cortes, executive director of Nueva Esperanza and the Hispanic Clergy, wants it all for North Philly's Latino community. And he wants it now. He wants a children's day camp that serves rice and beans. He wants a community college with a Latino flavor. He wants to help people on welfare get jobs. He wants to build homes. He wants to empower his people. So Cortes makes deals. Just like a Wall Street investment banker or a corporate hotshot.
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | By Lea Sitton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The question is: "Where are the jobs?" Carlo Marchetti of Springfield, Mass., raised his arms, flopped them back to his side, and looked around as he stood on a corner in Norris Square yesterday afternoon. "This is America, the Third World country. It's very sad," said Marchetti, who is president of Springfield Central, a private nonprofit agency working to revitalize downtown Springfield. Marchetti was one of about 60 urban-development specialists who took a bus tour of three Philadelphia communities: Frankford, Norris Square and Old City.
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Among the despair and debris, the drugs and poverty, city Latino leaders are trying to establish a neighborhood junior college. Esperanza, which means "hope" in Spanish, would have 400 to 600 students and provide hundreds of new jobs in Latino North Philadelphia. Leaders say it would serve as an "educational shining star" to barrio youths struggling with the worst dropout rates in the city. The effort is led by the Rev. Luis Cortes, executive director of the Hispanic Clergy network and Nueva Esperanza, a community development corporation based in Latino North Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They will be coming from Mexican American towns in the Southwest where Spanish was spoken long before English settlements existed. From Cuban enclaves in North Jersey and from Queens, N.Y., where the populations of South American immigrants outnumber major cities in their homelands. From North Philadelphia and Camden, where traditional Puerto Rican strongholds are now peppered with new arrivals from the Dominican Republic and Colombia. This week, more than 10,000 Latinos - diverse in race, tradition and politics but joined by language and heritage - will gather in Philadelphia for the 20th annual conference of the National Council of La Raza, the largest and most powerful Latino advocacy group in the country.
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NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The National Association of Home Builders and Nueva Esperanza have joined forces to build housing on land owned by the Hispanic faith-based community-development organization in several areas of the country, including Pennsylvania and South Jersey. The partnership, which also includes the Federal Home Loan Bank Board in Pittsburgh and Lowe's Cos. Inc., was created as part of the Bush administration's "Blueprint for the American Dream" program to increase minority homeownership by 5.5 million before the end of the decade.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, the area's Spanish-speaking community has been served by a host of small community and faith-based groups that view their efforts as a mission. A pastor would provide translation help during interviews. A church member might offer someone a daily ride to work. The food cupboard would fill in the gap when payday was a week away. Many of those efforts have been informal and one-on-one, without the management underpinnings that could transform them into programs eligible for federal grants.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They will be coming from Mexican American towns in the Southwest where Spanish was spoken long before English settlements existed. From Cuban enclaves in North Jersey and from Queens, N.Y., where the populations of South American immigrants outnumber major cities in their homelands. From North Philadelphia and Camden, where traditional Puerto Rican strongholds are now peppered with new arrivals from the Dominican Republic and Colombia. This week, more than 10,000 Latinos - diverse in race, tradition and politics but joined by language and heritage - will gather in Philadelphia for the 20th annual conference of the National Council of La Raza, the largest and most powerful Latino advocacy group in the country.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A North Philadelphia community development agency has bought a 150-acre site in North Coventry that will serve as a conference-retreat center and a campground for urban children. Nueva Esperanza ("new hope" in Spanish), a service agency that provides an array of health, job training and housing services in North Philadelphia, bought the former Fernbrook campground last month from the Southeast Conference of the United Church of Christ for $500,000. The agency will offer the property for rent to organizations as a conference location and will begin a children's summer camp, which will hold its first session starting July 13. The Nueva Esperanza Conference and Retreat Center will offer a camp to 300 children over the course of six weeks.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
He's part hustler, part pit bull and all dreamer. The Rev. Luis Cortes, executive director of Nueva Esperanza and the Hispanic Clergy, wants it all for North Philly's Latino community. And he wants it now. He wants a children's day camp that serves rice and beans. He wants a community college with a Latino flavor. He wants to help people on welfare get jobs. He wants to build homes. He wants to empower his people. So Cortes makes deals. Just like a Wall Street investment banker or a corporate hotshot.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
You're a poor Latino. You can't find a job because you're unskilled. Your kids talk about dropping out of school. Your rowhouse is falling apart and you don't have the money to fix it. That's life for most of the poor, decent people in Hispanic North Philadelphia: No money. No job. No hope. But that's slowly changing. "If the city can't help them, Latinos are going to help themselves," says the Rev. Luis Cortes, executive director of the Hispanic Clergy and Nueva Esperanza, their community development corporation.
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Among the despair and debris, the drugs and poverty, city Latino leaders are trying to establish a neighborhood junior college. Esperanza, which means "hope" in Spanish, would have 400 to 600 students and provide hundreds of new jobs in Latino North Philadelphia. Leaders say it would serve as an "educational shining star" to barrio youths struggling with the worst dropout rates in the city. The effort is led by the Rev. Luis Cortes, executive director of the Hispanic Clergy network and Nueva Esperanza, a community development corporation based in Latino North Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | By Lea Sitton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The question is: "Where are the jobs?" Carlo Marchetti of Springfield, Mass., raised his arms, flopped them back to his side, and looked around as he stood on a corner in Norris Square yesterday afternoon. "This is America, the Third World country. It's very sad," said Marchetti, who is president of Springfield Central, a private nonprofit agency working to revitalize downtown Springfield. Marchetti was one of about 60 urban-development specialists who took a bus tour of three Philadelphia communities: Frankford, Norris Square and Old City.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
For the city and neighbors in the largely Hispanic West Kensington area of North Philadelphia, it means one less vacant lot to worry about. For Angel Melendez it means a steady job with a chance to provide for his wife and three children. And for 20 lucky families it will mean a home to call their own. Two Latino civic organizations are joining forces to build 20 townhouses on a city-owned lot at Mascher and York streets, in one of the city's poorest and most blighted neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rev. Luis Cortez is on a mission. It's a mission borne of activism, fueled by divine inspiration and set in motion by an ecclesiastical desire for justice. Cortez is executive director of the Hispanic Clergy of Philadelphia and Nueva Esperanza, a non-profit, community development group, which is based in the First Spanish Baptist Church at York and Hancock streets, the heart of a predominately poor and seemingly forgotten Latino area of the city. Dark-haired and beared with a slight paunch, Cortez is part hustler, part politician, but all the way Christian.
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