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NEWS
August 28, 2007 | By LES T. CSORBA
TEN YEARS ago, Princess Diana's life was taken tragically in a tunnel in Paris. Hundreds of millions would watch the memorial. But then, as the world wept over Diana, the news arrived that Mother Teresa had died of cardiac arrest. The irony was that while the world mourned the princess they conferred sainthood upon, they overlooked the real saint. Now, 10 years later, concerts and articles are honoring the princess' life, but less is remembered about the nun. The death of Diana has been intensely scrutinized, when instead we would have been better served examining the life of another.
SPORTS
February 13, 1987 | By PAUL DOMOWITCH, Daily News Sports Writer
The first thing you should know about Maria Pares is that she is a basketball coach. The second thing you should know about her is that she is a nun. "Officials expect me to be sweet," said Pares, who is in her first season at the helm of the Marquette University women's program. "Wrong. I'm Greek and Sicilian, so there is some hot blood running in me. I'm from the Lou Carnesecca school of coaching. I throw some tantrums, get intense. There's no halo effect. " Sister Maria, whose role model is, of all people, Indiana's volatile Bobby Knight, has been coaching basketball for 14 years.
NEWS
March 21, 1987
Sister Ann Colleen Dougherty has been having trouble with motion sickness lately. First, a lawyer offered a motion that Sister Ann and other nuns be prevented from wearing their habits in a Philadelphia courtroom, because it might prejudice the jury. Then the judge withdrew from the case, rather than rule on that motion. Next, lawyers motioned for a gag order to keep Sister Ann from talking about the case. The good news is that the new trial judge has heard of the U.S. Constitution, and refused to issue the gag order.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When it was written in 1923, The Madman and the Nun was regarded as an outlandish piece of avant-garde theater, unappreciated by audiences and most critics. The playwright, Stanislaw Witkiewicz was, it turned out, a forerunner of the theater of the absurd and decades ahead of his time. To contemporary audiences familiar with the plays of Beckett and Ionesco and accustomed to the frankness of modern theater, The Madman and the Nun's crazy situations, insane-asylum setting and none-too-discreet sexual liaison between a lunatic and a nun seem neither particularly avant-garde nor outrageous.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The jury didn't believe the 71-year-old nun. Sister Norma Milton, of Summer Street, had insisted that Kelvin Kimble, 37, of Wilton Street near Vine, was the man who forced his way into her home and beat and robbed her on Dec. 16, 1991. "There is no doubt in my mind," Milton testified. "He's the man that did it. He was in my house for 10 minutes. " "Even a nun can be mistaken, or even lying for that matter," defense lawyer A. Charles Peruto Jr. argued before Kimble's acquittal yesterday.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
A New York City man arrested Thursday in the Bronx was awaiting arraignment here yesterday in connection with an attack on a nun at a North Philadelphia convent. Ernest Ortiz, 20, who listed a Bronx address, was arrested by police there and charged with being a fugitive from Philadelphia in connection with the assault Tuesday at St. Henry's convent in the city's Hunting Park section, police said yesterday. On Friday, Ortiz waived extradition on the charges and was returned to Philadelphia early yesterday.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Deborah Snyder, Special to The Inquirer
Forty percent of Hispanic students drop out of high school before graduating. If Sister Mary Consuela were in their shoes, she would do the same. "If . . . nobody could understand me and nobody cared for me, I would drop out as soon as I was 16," said Sister Mary Consuela, who directs the Center for the Teaching of the Americas at Immaculata College in East Whiteland Township. Since its founding 21 years ago, the center has been active in cross- cultural education, helping Hispanics learn about the United States and aiding citizens of this country learn about Latin American nations, Hispanic cultures and language.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | For The Inquirer / JERRY TRITT
Sister Paula Marie Buley inspects Immaculata College's library construction site with project manager Bill DiAddezio of Gaudet Associates. Sister Paula Marie is the one in the hard hat and habit. As vice president for financial affairs, she oversees construction and works with foremen.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | by Christine Bahls, Daily News Staff Writer
The nun chose a vow of silence. At a court hearing yesterday, a 62-year-old nun, reportedly beaten Halloween morning by her 32-year-old nephew because she was cleaning with a dog-hair-ridden mop, declined to testify against her kin. Instead, Sister Marie Troilo sat outside the courtroom of District Justice Ester Casillo while a West Norriton, Montgomery County, police corporal testified that when he arrived at the family home on Clinton Road,...
NEWS
April 15, 1992 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her "smokers' rights" platform includes legalizing marijuana. Her education program includes revitalizing 4-H clubs. And her energy-conservation plan includes clotheslines. Caroline P. Killeen is running on a low-tech, "back-to-the-'40s" campaign for president of the United States. A longtime bicyclist, Killeen, 66, wants to establish bicycle lanes across America. Playing to the long-standing incompatibility between bikers and runners, Killeen says the country needs a cyclist president because it already has a jogger.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
Charles Busch - a man - is perhaps not the most obvious casting choice for a Rosalind Russell-type nun. But since he wrote The Divine Sister , a comedic homage to Hollywood nuns, opening at the Bucks County Playhouse, we're willing to overlook gender. Why is this play so special to you? I hadn't had a critical success in a while, so I forgot what was it like. One line from the Times review, it was quite lovely, said it was my "freshest, funniest work in years, perhaps decades.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia nun convicted of driving while intoxicated will not get her teaching job back this school year, archdiocese officials say. A substitute will continue to teach Sister Kimberly A. Miller's theology class at Little Flower High School for Girls in Philadelphia, spokesman Ken Gavin said. "A decision was made to stay with the substitute in these few remaining weeks for the sake of continuity," Gavin said in a statement. The school year ends June 17. Her teaching status for the 2016-17 school year will be decided later by the Office of Catholic Education.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
ISSUE | MEDIA Poor news judgment I can't remember the last time there was so much media coverage of an drunken driving arrest ("Don't mix and drive," Monday). It happens every day. Some people are arrested two or three times, and almost no one finds out their identity. Maybe it was the blue habit and black veil that made the media think this story needed special attention. Sister Kimberly A. Miller made a mistake in November. We all make mistakes. But did this six-hour trial and the sentencing need to be splashed across every newspaper and carried on every television news channel for what seemed like two weeks?
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC SAFETY Don't mix and drive The articles about the trial of Sister Kimberly A. Miller struck a sad chord ("Nun found guilty of DWI," Thursday). I can understand both sides of the argument. Looking into her eyes, I didn't see a liar; I saw someone who didn't take driving seriously on one night. I see that everywhere I drive. We need to be aware of our dependence on substances such as alcohol and medicine, and, when they are combined, what the consequences might be. Coffee is all I use to keep alert while driving.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A judge in Gloucester County on Wednesday convicted a Philadelphia nun of driving while intoxicated, rejecting a claim that she had been "sleep-driving" under the influence of medication. "The court finds the defendant was under the influence of alcohol," Washington Township Municipal Court Judge Martin Whitcraft said in finding Sister Kimberly A. Miller guilty. Whitcraft flatly rejected the so-called Ambien defense, argued by Miller's lawyers and an expert who said she was "sleep-driving" after an adverse reaction to the drug and should not be held responsible.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Melanie Burney and Emily Babay, STAFF WRITERS
A Philadelphia nun on trial for alleged drunk driving and crashing into an auto-repair shop in South Jersey has invoked a relatively new defense: sleep-driving after taking a sleeping pill. Lawyers for Sister Kimberly Miller say she experienced an adverse reaction to Ambien, losing four hours of her life after taking the drug, drinking a glass of Mont LaSalle altar wine, and going to bed. When Miller - who had consumed two glasses of wine earlier in the night at a book fair - woke up, she testified, she was at a Washington Township police station, 20 miles from St. Veronica's, her North Philadelphia convent.
NEWS
April 15, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia nun on trial on drunken-driving charges testified Wednesday that she was under the influence of a sedative and had no recollection of crashing her car into a building on a South Jersey highway. Sister Kimberly Miller, a high school librarian and theology teacher, was arrested after driving her Chevrolet Impala into an auto repair shop in Washington Township, Gloucester County, last Nov. 15. Police alleged that she was intoxicated, had slurred speech and bloodshot eyes, and was staggering when she got out of her car. At the time of the accident, Miller was wearing her blue habit and black veil.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Sister Kimberly Kessler has learned the solitary truth about the path she has chosen. She has prayed, studied, and served with the Sisters of the Holy Redeemer in Huntingdon Valley for eight years, with two more to go before taking her final vows. She already has outlasted three other aspirants, who gave up along the way. At age 39 one of the youngest nuns in a community of just 18, she sometimes worries about a future with a dwindling group of sisters to carry on the mission. In Kessler, the predicament of religious life crystallizes.
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