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NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT'S GOING VIRAL. Ebola? No . . . at least not here in the United States, where the deadly virus has not spread among the general population. Although Ebola has been - and remains - a major, lethal public-health crisis in West Africa, cases in the U.S. have been limited to the death of a man who contracted the illness in Liberia before returning to Dallas, and now the infection of two hospital workers who treated him. What is going viral, however, is fear itself - what Franklin Roosevelt might have called "nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A national nursing-home chain with 20 facilities in Pennsylvania, five in the Philadelphia area, has agreed to pay the federal government $38 million for alleged Medicare fraud, including $10 million for overbilling and $28 million for providing poor patient care. Extendicare Health Services Inc. and subsidiary Progressive Step Corp. (ProStep) were accused of substandard care between 2007 and 2013 at 33 nursing homes in eight states. The Justice Department investigated the complaints of two whistle-blowers, one a director of rehabilitation in Pennsylvania and Delaware, who contended that ProStep inflated therapy bills and charged for therapy not provided at nearly all 21 facilities in the Eastern region.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN 1946, when Marguerite Lewis decided she wanted to be a nurse, opportunities to train African-Americans in the profession were severely limited. Not to be denied, she traveled to the Bronx, N.Y., to attend the Lincoln School for Nurses, founded in 1898 to train black women to become nurses. It was located on the grounds of the Society for the Relief of Worthy Indigent Colored Persons. From 1900 to 1961, when it graduated its last class, the school had trained a total of 1,864 women nurses.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union nurses, on strike Sunday and Monday at Crozer-Chester Medical Center, plan to continue picketing on Tuesday, even as negotiators from both sides have scheduled a morning bargaining session. Management at the Delaware County hospital will not permit the nurses to return to work at 7 a.m. Tuesday when their two day strike ends, saying no shifts will be available until Friday. The hospital has hired replacement nurses. The nurses, who planned a rally for Monday afternoon, had been working under terms of a contract which expired June 8. The union, Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals, said its approximately 550 members are striking over pay, benefits and staffing levels.
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union nurses at Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Delaware County went on strike Sunday morning in a dispute that involves pay, pensions, and staffing levels. Wearing red T-shirts, nurses picketed on the hospital perimeter in Upland while replacement workers from the Colorado staffing agency U.S. Nursing Corp. did their jobs inside. The hospital, which has taken an aggressive marketing stance against the strike, maintains the fight is about money. Saying it is in financial trouble, it has proposed cutting pay for its most senior nurses and switching to a less-lucrative retirement plan.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gearing up for a two-day strike starting Sunday, hospital officials and union nurses at Crozer-Chester Medical Center can agree on one thing: Sunday's expected two-day work stoppage would represent a failure of bargaining. But the agreement ends there, as each side accuses the other of irresponsible tactics in negotiating a contract for 550 nurses. Also fueling the conflict is management's decision to prevent the nurses from returning to work Tuesday morning as replacement nurses fill their shifts for three more days.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marguerite L. Johnson, 85, of the Carroll Park section of West Philadelphia, a nurse-practitioner who worked in city schools for 22 years, died Tuesday, Sept. 2, at ManorCare Health Services-Yeadon of a heart condition. Offering comfort and care to all who came through her office, Mrs. Johnson held a number of posts in Philadelphia and New York throughout her 43-year nursing career. A Philadelphia native, Mrs. Johnson went to New York after her high school graduation in 1946 to attend the Lincoln School for Nurses in the Bronx, which was founded in 1898 to train black women to become nurses.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BIRMINGHAM, ALA., was a powder keg of civil-rights violence in the early 1960s. And Thelma Davis English was there. Herself a native of Alabama, Thelma and her husband, Vann, and their daughter Carolyn, left the safety of Philadelphia to become foot soldiers in the civil-rights movement led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and others. The activists, however nonviolent in keeping with King's philosophy, were met with snarling police dogs, fire hoses and billy clubs wielded by the forces of Eugene "Bull" Connor, the city's commissioner of public safety.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the Philadelphia School District began the academic year Monday amid budgetary uncertainty, a proposal to fund the addition of nurses in schools that need them was being presented at 30th Street Station. U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D., Pa.), a cosponsor of the bill, said the NURSE Act - Nurses for Under-Resourced Schools Everywhere - calls for implementation of competitive grant programs to reduce the ratio of students to nurses throughout the United States. According to the bill, districts where the ratio is greater than 750-1 would be eligible to apply for grants.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
After more than six decades of hands-on caring for the sick and elderly in South Jersey, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden announced Tuesday that it is seeking to sell its four nursing and elder-care facilities because it can no longer afford to maintain them. "The current nursing-home model cannot be sustained," Bishop Dennis J. Sullivan said in a statement declaring that he was seeking buyers for Our Lady's MultiCare Center in Pleasantville, Bishop McCarthy Residence in Vineland, and St. Mary's Catholic Home in Cherry Hill, which includes the Manor at St. Mary's, a residential health-care facility.
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