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NEWS
January 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOYCE SAPP was curious about her family background, and discovered that she had some Apache back there. And she joined with a man who had Cherokee in his family background. A lot of African-Americans discover some American Indian ancestry if they care to dig deeply into it. And Joyce did. Her interest in both American Indian and African-American history became a passion, and she enjoyed reading about it and passing her knowledge on to her children and grandchildren. Joyce D. Sapp, who worked for many years in nursing homes, mostly in the suburbs where she found satisfaction in helping senior citizens, died of cancer on Jan. 21. She was 69 and was living in Atlanta, but had lived most of her life in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
A CITY PRISON inmate awaiting trial for three unrelated murders attacked a correctional officer and a nurse at Albert Einstein Medical Center, where he'd been taken for a medical procedure, in a botched escape attempt yesterday. The inmate, Justin Mackie, 20, was tackled by hospital security officers and remains under guard at Einstein for unspecified reasons. The correctional officer remains hospitalized with head injuries, prisons spokeswoman Shawn Hawes said. The nurse was treated and released, Einstein spokesman Damien Woods said.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faith Jerome, 76, of Cherry Hill, a longtime nurse and member of the township's school board, died Monday, Dec. 22, at home of pancreatic cancer. When a local school was slated to close in the early 1980s, a friend persuaded Mrs. Jerome to run for the Cherry Hill school board. Fifteen years later, when she decided against seeking a sixth term, former board member James Marino told The Inquirer that "she has great integrity. . . . I can't think of a decision she ever made that she didn't feel she was doing in the best interest of the children of Cherry Hill.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bonnie Haas spent the bulk of her professional life in hospitals tending to some of the sickest patients as an intensive-care nurse. But it has been a lifesaving act of a far more personal nature that has preoccupied her for the last two years. The 57-year-old Bucks County mother of four has revived the family business. That it has come at tremendous professional and personal sacrifice, and tested her emotional fortitude, was as clear as Haas' tears during a recent interview at Kettle Creek Corp.'s workshop and warehouse in Warminster.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The National Labor Relations Board's regional director has brought civil charges against Crozer-Chester Medical Center in connection with a two-day nurses' strike against the Upland Borough hospital in September. After a hearing set for February, the board will determine whether the medical center improperly curtailed union members from leafleting and improperly withheld information from the union, the Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals (PASNAP). "We believe that Crozer-Chester Medical Center has acted lawfully and appropriately throughout this very difficult situation," the hospital said in a statement.
SPORTS
November 26, 2014 | By Zach Berman and Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writers
Injuries have decimated the Eagles' inside linebacker corps since the summer, and they might be missing Emmanuel Acho on Thursday against the Dallas Cowboys. Acho injured his groin Sunday against the Tennessee Titans and was a limited participant Monday at practice.  "Don't write Acho off as dead yet," coach Chip Kelly said. "We're going to go out there and see what he can do and then we'll figure it out as we get going here. " Acho told reporters he is hopeful that he can play.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rita Hodge Sellers, 84, a longtime nurse, health administrator and educator, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at Normandy Farms Estates retirement center in Blue Bell. Mrs. Sellers was known by family and friends as a strong mentor who was passionate about helping others, recalled her daughter, Suzanne Rita Sellers. She described her mother as someone who worked to keep herself healthy and whose favorite hobby was traveling. "She visited Rome, China, and Africa," said Suzanne Sellers. "I still remember when she and my dad took me to Paris as a graduation present when I was in college.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Rita E. McGinley, 61, a nurse and disability services coordinator for Haddon Township from 1998 to 2000, died of respiratory failure on Sunday, Nov. 9 at Kindred Hospital in Havertown. From 1996 to 1998, Ms. McGinley was the Americans for Disabilities Act coordinator for the township, said a sister, Monica McGinley. Ms. McGinley had lived for the last 14 years at Inglis House in Philadelphia, which a spokesman described as a long-term-care wheelchair community. She earned summa cum laude status at all three of the schools from which she graduated, Paul VI High School in 1971, Helene Fuld School of Nursing in 1974, and Thomas Jefferson University, from which she earned a bachelor's in nursing in 1983, her sister said.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Wegoye, an emergency-room nurse at Inspira Medical Center Woodbury, will leave Thursday for at least four months in Liberia helping fight the Ebola epidemic. Wegoye, 33, who lives in Haddon Township, said he had been following the crisis, and when the World Health Organization declared it a disaster, he felt he had to step forward. "When I noticed it was not being contained, but just kept spiraling, I started searching for ways to actually help. " "The risks I totally understand," Wegoye added.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
See a problem in your daily life. Say to yourself, "Wow, the smartphone in my pocket could help solve that. " Become an inventor and entrepreneur. That's the well-worn path that physician Larry Wolk is treading with his new app, eAttending, even if he knows it's full of pitfalls. With more than a million apps offered in each of the leading marketplaces, it's tough to get traction for a new idea - and no shock if different apps offer competing solutions to similar problems. For a medical app likely to overlap with features of hospitals' new electronic records systems, the challenge is even more daunting.
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