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Nurse

NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rita Hodge Sellers, 84, a longtime nurse, health administrator and educator, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at Normandy Farms Estates retirement center in Blue Bell. Mrs. Sellers was known by family and friends as a strong mentor who was passionate about helping others, recalled her daughter, Suzanne Rita Sellers. She described her mother as someone who worked to keep herself healthy and whose favorite hobby was traveling. "She visited Rome, China, and Africa," said Suzanne Sellers. "I still remember when she and my dad took me to Paris as a graduation present when I was in college.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Rita E. McGinley, 61, a nurse and disability services coordinator for Haddon Township from 1998 to 2000, died of respiratory failure on Sunday, Nov. 9 at Kindred Hospital in Havertown. From 1996 to 1998, Ms. McGinley was the Americans for Disabilities Act coordinator for the township, said a sister, Monica McGinley. Ms. McGinley had lived for the last 14 years at Inglis House in Philadelphia, which a spokesman described as a long-term-care wheelchair community. She earned summa cum laude status at all three of the schools from which she graduated, Paul VI High School in 1971, Helene Fuld School of Nursing in 1974, and Thomas Jefferson University, from which she earned a bachelor's in nursing in 1983, her sister said.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Wegoye, an emergency-room nurse at Inspira Medical Center Woodbury, will leave Thursday for at least four months in Liberia helping fight the Ebola epidemic. Wegoye, 33, who lives in Haddon Township, said he had been following the crisis, and when the World Health Organization declared it a disaster, he felt he had to step forward. "When I noticed it was not being contained, but just kept spiraling, I started searching for ways to actually help. " "The risks I totally understand," Wegoye added.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
See a problem in your daily life. Say to yourself, "Wow, the smartphone in my pocket could help solve that. " Become an inventor and entrepreneur. That's the well-worn path that physician Larry Wolk is treading with his new app, eAttending, even if he knows it's full of pitfalls. With more than a million apps offered in each of the leading marketplaces, it's tough to get traction for a new idea - and no shock if different apps offer competing solutions to similar problems. For a medical app likely to overlap with features of hospitals' new electronic records systems, the challenge is even more daunting.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
What began as a Deptford woman's "why not?" entry to a national potato chip contest has proved to be a moment of record in the annals of American snack history. Meneko Spigner McBeth's Kettle Cooked Wasabi Ginger chip proposal also has brought her national attention, $1 million, and possibly a new Audi. And there's the five-pound weight gain she jokes about. McBeth, 35, a Temple University Hospital medical-surgical nurse, was named the winner of the Frito-Lay "Do Us a Flavor" contest during a dinner in New York City on Monday evening.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Salem County nurse tried in vain Friday night to resuscitate her daughter, who'd been struck by a hit-and-run driver, then run over by a second car on a dark rural road. Cathy Burns, 55, administered CPR to her daughter, Chelsea Burns, 25, on Woodstown-Alloway Road in Pilesgrove around 11:30 p.m., state police from the Woodstown barracks said. But Burns could not revive her daughter, a waitress at a pizza restaurant and mother of a 3-year-old boy. Chelsea Burns was dead at the scene, state police said.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Urging calm and appealing to the public to use common sense, Mayor Nutter said Friday that it is highly unlikely that Ebola will pose a threat in Philadelphia, but that the city has prepared well for such an emergency. "The disease is not airborne, it is not easy to catch, and you can only contract it from someone who is symptomatic," Nutter said during an afternoon news conference with other city officials. "A lot of people are anxious about this," he said, "but we need to focus on the facts.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT'S GOING VIRAL. Ebola? No . . . at least not here in the United States, where the deadly virus has not spread among the general population. Although Ebola has been - and remains - a major, lethal public-health crisis in West Africa, cases in the U.S. have been limited to the death of a man who contracted the illness in Liberia before returning to Dallas, and now the infection of two hospital workers who treated him. What is going viral, however, is fear itself - what Franklin Roosevelt might have called "nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN Dorethea Mae Shuler arrived in Philadelphia in the mid-1960s, she had a couple of strikes against her. Her marriage had ended and she had small children to care for. She was African-American, which in the 1960s was more of an obstacle than it is today, and she had no job skills. What Dorethea did have was a desire to care for others, the sick and the needy of her adopted city, and she set about doing just that. She obtained a license as a practical nurse and went to work in local hospitals and nursing homes, delivering her special brand of love and compassion to those who needed her most.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A national nursing-home chain with 20 facilities in Pennsylvania, five in the Philadelphia area, has agreed to pay the federal government $38 million for alleged Medicare fraud, including $10 million for overbilling and $28 million for providing poor patient care. Extendicare Health Services Inc. and subsidiary Progressive Step Corp. (ProStep) were accused of substandard care between 2007 and 2013 at 33 nursing homes in eight states. The Justice Department investigated the complaints of two whistle-blowers, one a director of rehabilitation in Pennsylvania and Delaware, who contended that ProStep inflated therapy bills and charged for therapy not provided at nearly all 21 facilities in the Eastern region.
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