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NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in an orphanage in Haiti, Thomy Elusme brushed his teeth regularly and never got a cavity. Yet by his teenage years, a few teeth had started to become loose and one eventually fell out. After coming to New Jersey to live with a host family, the soft-spoken 20-year-old had to have a second one pulled. Elusme suffers from a condition all too familiar to periodontist Daniel H. Fine, who examined the young man last month at the Rutgers University School of Dental Medicine in Newark, N.J. For more than 30 years, Fine has been tackling the mystery of why, through no apparent fault of their own, up to 2 percent of black youths have loose teeth.
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maude Freeman Coles and seven of her girlfriends began their monthly get-togethers when they were teenagers at Palmyra High School. They played bridge, four players at each of two tables, and rotated as hosts from house to house. When ill health subtracted two of them, they became six at one table, playing a card game now lost to memory. "They called themselves the Sixers," Mrs. Coles' daughter, Carol Graf, said. When Mrs. Coles was 92, the card games ended, but she and five friends still got together once a year for lunch at her home.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Kay Gibbons, 76, of Philadelphia, a nurse and lifelong caregiver for friends, neighbors and family, died Sunday, May 3, of cancer at home. Mrs. Gibbons, whose maiden name was Kearney, was at various times a working nurse, corporate nurse, and visitor to the sick and homebound. Her family, though, joked that she also practiced "whole listic" nursing - as she had a whole list of remedies from a lifetime of experience. She could recommend an herbal product or over-the-counter item for whatever was ailing anyone.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  During World War II, Doris Bourgeois wanted to serve in the military. But Navy recruiters rejected her because of weak eyesight. "She went to apply for the Army," a daughter, Lucille Ettore, said. "She was 5-foot-1 and 88 pounds. They would not accept her. " So she gained 12 pounds, went back, enlisted, and eventually became a trumpet player in the Women's Army Corps Band from 1943 to 1945. On Saturday, May 2, Doris Bourgeois DeAngelis, 93, who became a licensed practical nurse in Camden County in her 50s, died of Alzheimer's disease at the New Jersey Veterans Memorial Home in Vineland, where she had lived for the last six years.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For first-year Temple nursing students, a recent classroom session on how to cover rent, child care, food, medicine, and transportation on a bare-bones budget was an academic exercise. But for many of their patients, that simulation symbolizes brutal reality. In Philadelphia, a staggering 28 percent of residents live in poverty. For many, deprivation also means a life of poor health. Without decent housing, access to medical care, healthful food, and safe exercise outlets - and with the stress that comes with deprivation - the poor face major hurdles to getting and staying well.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Center City man who was going to nursing school while working as a pimp pleaded guilty Thursday to third-degree murder in the 2013 death and dismemberment of a john he had set up to be robbed. With five jurors selected for his trial in Common Pleas Court and two prostitutes prepared to testify against him, Keith "King" Tolbert decided to take a plea deal that will put him in prison for 22 to 44 years. Tolbert, 35, will be sentenced Friday by Judge J. Scott O'Keefe. His attorney, Mary T. Maran, said Tolbert wants to express his remorse to the family of Francis Zarzycki, 40, and tell authorities where he dumped the victim's missing body parts.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriet Hillebrand Burns' decision to become a psychiatric nurse was swift. "At her first taste of an autopsy" while a nursing student, her husband John E. Burns recalled, "she said, 'I'm going into psych nursing.' " He suggested that in her career, "if she could be likened to a part of the body, she was a shoulder. " At a Veterans Administration medical center in Los Angeles in the late 1950s and early 1960s where she nursed, he said, "people could confide in her and seek her counsel.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ALL CHANEL Jacobs wanted was to be a registered nurse. The South Philadelphia woman withdrew from Community College of Philadelphia, which had a waiting list for nursing, after she got accepted into a 15-month program at Jersey College School of Nursing in May. But instead of getting her license, Jacobs claims she has been cheated out of her education - and $29,000. Jacobs claimed the school failed her and several other students five times on the final exam but never showed them their scores and later accused them of cheating.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* NURSE JACKIE. 9 p.m. Sunday, Showtime.   JACKIE Peyton's life is spinning out of control, and there's nothing funny about that to Edie Falco, the woman who plays Showtime's drug-addicted "Nurse Jackie. " "My experience with addiction, people I love, that I've worried about and stuff," is that it goes the way it's gone for Jackie, said Falco, in an interview in January to talk about the show's final season, which begins Sunday with her character in jail. "I mean, how many times have I said, or have I heard people say, 'Isn't it enough?
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even in nursing homes, where hundreds of thousands of people die each year, death has long been a touchy subject. Administrators thought they were doing residents and staff a psychological favor by whisking dead bodies out back doors and carrying on as usual. It seemed too depressing to think about how many people were leaving and how many would follow. Attitudes are beginning to change, though, thanks to a greater emphasis on bringing meaning and individual choice - in other words, more life - to those last years in long-term care.
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