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Nursery School

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NEWS
April 11, 2004 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Barbara Brunermer, cutting brightly colored tissue paper, fields questions from the Pennsbury High School students teaching in the nursery school next door. "Some of the kids don't like the snack. Should we give them something else?" "Do you have any normal-people scissors? I can't use these little ones. " All the while, Brunermer looks through an observation window, monitoring the interaction between the teenagers and the 4-year-olds in the prekindergarten class at the high school.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ten minutes into the start of nursery school, Brandon Much had an important job to do as classroom Line Leader. With a bright red Line Leader badge pinned to his shirt and a smile on his face, Brandon, 6, led his classmates to the first activity of the day. The simple act of walking is an accomplishment for Brandon, who has cerebral palsy, said Sue McKenney, Strath Haven High School teacher and nursery school director. "He was being carried when he started school. He used a walker at home, but refused in the classroom," McKenney said.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
At Marlton's Cherokee High School, some of the best teachers aren't tall enough to reach the faucets of the sinks in the school's home economics rooms. They're not allowed to peek into the refrigerator or turn on the stove or dishwasher, and if they have to go to the bathroom, they have to raise their hands first. After last Friday's burst of cold weather, most of them were wearing winter coats for the first time this year, and nearly all had trouble getting them off. As for being able to tie shoes, forget it. That's why Velcro was invented, their mothers would say. "Here, young children are the teachers," said home economics teacher Teresa Wood, who started a nursery school program at the school as a way for her high school students to get hands-on experience in child development.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Upper Dublin Lutheran Church in Ambler will open a new nursery school this fall, church officials said. The school will offer a "Christ-centered program where each child is nurtured emotionally and educationally," director Amy Conley said. The curriculum will include teachings about God as well as instruction in skills that will prepare children for school, Conley said. Those skills include language and reading, math, communication, listening and sharing. The nursery school will have a morning session and an afternoon session, each with 12 students and each taught by a certified teacher, said Conley, who has taught kindergarten through fourth grade since 1971.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Leonetti Quinto, 80, of West Collingswood, N.J., who was known to generations of South Philadelphia nursery school children and parents as "Miss Mary," died Sunday at Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia. Mrs. Quinto, a former South Philadelphia resident, began working as a substitute child-care worker at the Franklin Day Nursery in 1935. She later became a teacher, then head teacher, and finally teacher/director of the center, which has been in a red-brick rowhouse at Seventh and Jackson Streets since 1909.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal by the Middletown Baptist Church to open a morning-only nursery school has been presented to the Middletown Township Planning Commission. Gary Dunn, attorney representing the church at 28 S. Middletown Rd., said the proposed school would be an accessory use to the church. He told Planning Commission members Tuesday that his presentation was an overview and that official plans would be presented at next month's meeting. "The school will serve between 30 and 50 preschoolers, ages three and four, Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to noon," said Dunn.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | By Jonathan Berr, Special to The Inquirer
The Chalfont Borough Council has denied a Plymouth Meeting developer's request for a use-and-occupancy permit for a nursery school in the company's shopping center on Route 202 at Moyer Road. Chris Schubert, an attorney for Pennmark Inc., said it wanted a permit for the Rocking Horse Child Care Center in its New Britain Village Shopping Center "to get the company (Rocking Horse) going. " Borough solicitor L. Franklin Hartzell said at the council meeting Tuesday night that Pennmark would have to redo the paving and make other improvements to allay the borough's concerns about possible liability.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Crossing Cooperative Nursery School will hold its annual book fair from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. The fair will feature hundreds of titles from more than 70 publishers, including how-to books, biographies, classics, and a variety of the newest children's literature. From 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, there also will be a breakfast with Santa. Waffles, fruit, muffins and beverages will be served, and there will be an opportunity to create a holiday craft and have a photo taken with Santa.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Lieber, 54, of Medford, who survived brain surgery when she was 6, and subsequent disability, to work as a teacher's assistant at Tots Cooperative Nursery School in Moorestown from 1980 to 2005, died of a stroke Wednesday, Nov. 5, at her home. "She was an unusually brilliant child," her mother, Marlene, said, "but when she started school, she started having problems - falling, dropping things. "I took her to a psychologist and he said, 'Her IQ is 140 and she has organic brain damage.' " "After surgery and radiation," Marlene Lieber said, "they told me there was no hope and there was three months to live.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nursery school administrator Daria LeRoy took a chance and broke down a barrier two years ago when she admitted 3-year-old Dominic Montecchio to the Mount Hope Children's Center. Dominic has autism, a condition that affects the ability to socialize and communicate. His mother, Maureen Montecchio, working with LeRoy and Mount Hope teachers, came up with a program that nursery schools can use to include autistic children. The program has caught the attention of the Delaware County Early Childhood Education Association, an organization of nursery school and child-care providers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elsie Alberghini Kandrak taught briefly at elementary schools in Connecticut after she graduated from college there. But Mrs. Kandrak dropped out of teaching to raise her four youngsters, daughter Deborah McCracken said. Then, after moving to South Jersey in 1964, she decided to blend teaching and caring for her children, and ran the Catalina Hills Nursery School in Magnolia for six to 10 preschoolers at a time. She did it from 1968 to 1985, in her converted garage, next to her house.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sara Park Scattergood, 100, a longtime teacher in the Philadelphia area, died Wednesday, Nov. 12, of causes related to aging at Kendal-Crosslands Community in Kennett Square. Known to friends as "Sally," Mrs. Scattergood was a beloved teacher at various institutions, including the Miquon School, Plymouth Meeting Friends School, Springside School, and Germantown Friends School. She also taught in the Philadelphia public schools for a year. Her specialty was teaching nursery school, kindergarten and fourth grade.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Lieber, 54, of Medford, who survived brain surgery when she was 6, and subsequent disability, to work as a teacher's assistant at Tots Cooperative Nursery School in Moorestown from 1980 to 2005, died of a stroke Wednesday, Nov. 5, at her home. "She was an unusually brilliant child," her mother, Marlene, said, "but when she started school, she started having problems - falling, dropping things. "I took her to a psychologist and he said, 'Her IQ is 140 and she has organic brain damage.' " "After surgery and radiation," Marlene Lieber said, "they told me there was no hope and there was three months to live.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The sanctuary is gutted. The stained-glass windows, including two Tiffanys and two by Violet Oakley, are gone, safe in the arms of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The altar and reredos, carved from Caen stone in 1896 by a Germantown craftsman named William J. Grueler at a cost of $2,500 ($70,000 in 2013 dollars), sit almost unnoticed in the darkened sanctuary. Things might have been worse for the 140-year-old St. Peter's Episcopal Church, at Wayne Avenue and Harvey Street in Germantown, shuttered since April 2005, when its dwindling congregation found it impossible to keep up the four buildings and two-acre site.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
GOLDA Lillian Nichols could be found every morning at 5:30 on her knees, offering up prayers for family, friends and anyone else she thought needed a blessing. It was faith that guided Golda's life and made her a person who was always looking for a way to help those who needed her special brand of compassion and love. "She was a perfect example of caring for others," her family said. "She was an adviser, giver and a great friend. She would lend a helping hand to anyone who was in need.
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Beth Douglas was antsy. She had been called into the McDonald's where she worked, near Underwood-Memorial Hospital in Woodbury, and she was miles away at a body shop she didn't know. Her friend Pat Colna, owner of the nursery school Douglas' children have attended for years, had agreed to give her a lift. But first, Colna said she had some business at the shop. "There was all this commotion and my baby [2-year-old Xavier] was crying a bit in the backseat. I didn't know what to think," Douglas said of the scene last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011
STATE OF GEORGIA. 8:30 p.m. June 29, ABC Family. BEST-SELLING novelist (and longtime Queen Village resident) Jennifer Weiner is going Hollywood. And not the way she did when her second book, "In Her Shoes," was made into a Major Motion Picture and she got to cash the check, drop in on the set and bring her family to the premiere. Or even in the way the former Inquirer feature writer's semiautobiographical Cannie Shapiro did in Weiner's first, breakout novel "Good in Bed," selling a screenplay and becoming BFF with a movie star.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
Residents and community organizers took to the streets in Southwest Philadelphia late yesterday afternoon to oppose a proposed prison - or as its supporters call it, a re-entry center - a block from a nursery school. Semantics aside, the planned facility, on Grays Avenue near Lindbergh Boulevard, received a zoning variance in December despite a petition signed by 2,700 people opposing the building. "Why would they put a place here? . . . It's not called for," said Pat Buel, 64, who's lived in the neighborhood for more than 30 years.
NEWS
December 30, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After leaving the nursing profession for love, Pauline A. Edmund became her husband's right hand in what would become a world-renowned science-gadget business. She worked as the bookkeeper and personnel manager at the Barrington-based Edmund Scientific Co., founded by her husband, Norman, while also doing volunteer work around South Jersey. No matter what she was involved in, her family said, she always was "the supervisor" or "the boss. " It was ingrained in her personality. Mrs. Edmund, 96, died following a stroke on Thursday, Dec. 23, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where she and her husband had retired in 1975.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
Elaine Dumoch, 80, of Mount Laurel, a former community theater actress who also put on educational puppet shows, died from complications of Alzheimer's disease on Sunday, Oct. 10, at her home. In the 1970s, Mrs. Dumoch impressed South Jersey residents with her comic interpretations of various characters, including the Goose that Laid the Golden Egg and George Washington. Mrs. Dumoch acted for a community theater that served Willingboro and Mount Holly for several years, said her daughter Gwen Stubbolo.
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