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NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nearly half of all Americans older than 65 will spend some time in a nursing home, a statistic that overshadows the wish of most seniors to spend their final days in their real homes. The nursing-home stay may be for just a short while, or it could be longer if chronic health conditions dictate. Like it or not, it is that inevitability that makes the selection of a nursing home so important and difficult. One of the best tools available to help make a choice is Medicare's Web site, www.medicare.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
One day last winter, Marion A. Torrence woke up in St. Joseph's Hospital on Girard Avenue, an apparent mugging victim. "They told me I was burned about the head and on the shoulder. They told me I'd been struck. I don't even remember. Someone brought me to the hospital, but I don't know who. " Torrence, 87, was living alone in her North Philadelphia home. For 43 years, she'd shared the house with her husband. But since his death 14 years ago, she'd been alone. "Unfortunately, we had no children," she said.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of Tucker House, a financially ailing nursing home at 10th and Wallace Streets, plan to close the nine-year-old home next month unless they receive emergency relief. Tucker House spokesmen yesterday confirmed that they already had started to move patients to other nursing homes in the area, adding that they would continue to do so until all 181 patients had been relocated. "It's very unfortunate. Most of the patients and employees have been here nine years," said Paula Burroughs, the administrator of Tucker House.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a 77-year-old woman yesterday sued a Philadelphia nursing home, alleging that the home illegally demanded more than $24,000 before it would admit her in 1984 and then discharged her without a hearing, violating her constitutional rights. Officials of the Golden Slipper Uptown Home for the Aged, at 7800 Bustleton Ave., contended that the woman, Jessie Eisenberg, is aggressive and a danger to the other residents of the 236-bed nursing home. To her family, Eisenberg is the victim of a system that demands illegal "up-front payments" before admitting people into a nursing home and then allows nursing-home operators to discharge residents without a hearing, in violation of their constitutional rights.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The General Accounting Office yesterday reported that the majority of private nursing-home insurance policies being sold have serious gaps, including policy restrictions and limitations designed to reduce benefits to consumers. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, also said that a lack of standards and marketing requirements has increased the potential for abuses by unscrupulous salespeople and companies in the long-term-care market. Unlike the market for Medigap policies, which are sold to the elderly to provide medical care not covered by Medicare, there are no federal guidelines for policies that cover nursing-home or home-health care.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Suburban General Hospital in East Norriton Township has begun construction of a $7.5 million nursing home on its grounds to fill a need for nursing-home beds in Montgomery County. The home is expected to be the only skilled nursing facility affiliated with a hospital in the Norristown area, according to spokeswoman Cindy Forbes Raquet. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held yesterday. Bill Janssen, Suburban's vice president of finance, said the hospital, at 2701 DeKalb Pike, has never had a nursing home and "always thought it could finish off our total package.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael R. Walker's mission as head of Genesis Health Ventures, a nursing- home chain based in Kennett Square, is to eliminate society's stereotypical attitude toward nursing-home residents. His mission is not going unnoticed, not even by President Reagan. On Wednesday, the company received an award in Washington under a presidential program for private sector initiative. The award was given to the company in recognition of its innovative approach to bringing together the educational needs of nursing-home residents and of students looking for ways to practice their teaching skills.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
Rugby Road in Haverford Township is the kind of place where neighbors borrow sugar, hold block parties, even take vacations together. "A lot of neighborhoods, it can be years before you get to know your neighbors," said Tad Sperry, who moved there two years ago. "I can walk down the street and talk to anybody. You get to be pretty good friends here. " But Sperry and others say that one homeowner on the block - state Rep. Richard A. McClatchy Jr. (R., Montgomery County) - has been less than neighborly.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ida Ritthaler, at 86, and Frances Lieberman, at 90, are smiling more. They have been untied. The two residents of different Philadelphia nursing homes had been restrained to immovable objects for several years by well-meaning people who wanted to protect them. Their confinement was ironic. Traveling was in Ida Ritthaler's blood. Beginning in 1929, when she fled her depression-ridden home town in Germany's Black Forest, she had hopscotched the Atlantic, sometimes once a year.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Brooks Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Smoking, littering, and wildly driving students are terrorizing the residents of a nursing home across from Downingtown High School, according to the facility's top administrator. "We have elderly people here who get frightened at the students' behavior," said Colleen Frankenfield, head administrator of St. Martha Manor, a 120-bed long-term-care facility. "To be honest, we're concerned somebody here is going to get hurt. " Frankenfield said students distressed residents and their elderly visitors by gathering in the nursing-home parking lot to smoke and hang out before and after school.
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NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN Dorethea Mae Shuler arrived in Philadelphia in the mid-1960s, she had a couple of strikes against her. Her marriage had ended and she had small children to care for. She was African-American, which in the 1960s was more of an obstacle than it is today, and she had no job skills. What Dorethea did have was a desire to care for others, the sick and the needy of her adopted city, and she set about doing just that. She obtained a license as a practical nurse and went to work in local hospitals and nursing homes, delivering her special brand of love and compassion to those who needed her most.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
After more than six decades of hands-on caring for the sick and elderly in South Jersey, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden announced Tuesday that it is seeking to sell its four nursing and elder-care facilities because it can no longer afford to maintain them. "The current nursing-home model cannot be sustained," Bishop Dennis J. Sullivan said in a statement declaring that he was seeking buyers for Our Lady's MultiCare Center in Pleasantville, Bishop McCarthy Residence in Vineland, and St. Mary's Catholic Home in Cherry Hill, which includes the Manor at St. Mary's, a residential health-care facility.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey investment firm has agreed to pay $30.25 million for Northeast Philadelphia's Deer Meadows Retirement Community, which filed for bankruptcy protection in April. Investment 360 L.L.C., of Lakewood, will function as a "stalking horse bidder" at an auction next month, setting a baseline price, according to a bankruptcy court filing. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Eric L. Frank on Monday scheduled a hearing for Aug. 11 on a proposed breakup fee that would pay 2.5 percent of the purchase price, or $756,250, to Investment 360 if the deal does not close or a higher bidder emerges.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has reached an agreement to sell its seven nursing and senior-living facilities for $145 million, officials said Tuesday. It's the biggest deal yet in Archbishop Charles J. Chaput's effort to fill deep financial gaps caused by years of overspending and mismanagement. The buyer, Center Management Group, is a privately held for-profit company in Flushing, N.Y. Center Management owns and operates 15 nursing homes in New York and New Jersey, including two former Catholic homes in Brooklyn, archdiocesan officials said.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Deptford nursing home scrutinized by health officials for persistent issues has lost its federal agreement providing for Medicare and Medicaid payments, making its closing likely. All residents at the 139-bed Gloucester Manor Health Care Center receiving payments under the programs must leave the facility by Aug. 1, according to a letter sent to families late last week by the center's administrator. The Salina Road home has been on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' "Special Focus Facility" list for three years.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The piano had no use. Someone hauled the beat-up piano into a big trash bin parked at a nursing home in Germantown, then took off. The woman had no memory. Sometimes, her son had to remind her to change her clothes or turn off the gas stove after cooking. But when the piano came into the life of the 79-year-old mother, magic happened, not only for her, but for all the seniors at the NewCourtland LIFE Center in North Philadelphia. The story begins two years ago with R. Max Kent.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
VINCENT PRICE was raised in poverty as a foster child, then spent much of his adult life on the streets, addicted to drugs. He was in his early 50s, laid low by severe emphysema and out of options, when he landed four years ago at the Philadelphia Nursing Home on Girard Avenue. The experience gave Price a new sense of purpose in life: getting out of the city-owned, outside-managed North Philadelphia institution. "It was like being in a minijail," complained Price, who chafed at not being able to leave the building, the erratic times that his breakfast showed up and the tedium of his life.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia delivered some relatively positive financial news Friday. Catholic Health Care Services, for example, which operates six nursing homes and a retirement home, had an operating profit of $3.9 million in the year ended June 30. Results at the facilities, which have been for sale since the summer, improved significantly from a loss of $497,454 the previous year, according to an audited financial statement released Friday....
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gene Sauers began working at the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare on Feb. 17, 1964. The Beatles had appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show the week before. Medicare for the elderly and Medicaid for the indigent would be signed into law a year later. "There were tremendous political fights. It was worse then," Sauers said. And the rollout? "The problems now with Obamacare are nothing compared with the problems with Medicare. It took two decades to get it resolved. " By that time, Sauers was managing DPW's Bucks County Assistance Office, gathering the half-century of experience that he writes about in a slim paperback with largish print, Medicaid, PA Nursing Homes, and You . The contents are about as sexy as the title, and just as basic - 82 pages of frequently asked questions divided into chapters with headings like "Application Procedures: Where Do I Go?
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peggy Philp, 86, never even considered living in a nursing home when she was younger, but, after surviving breast cancer and a "slight" heart attack, she found she needed one. She also found it much homier than many her age expect. At WillowBrooke Court in Fort Washington, she got to bring the figurines she has collected and the portrait she painted of her late husband, who died in 1983. In the picture on her wall, he is a young man with soulful brown eyes. "As long as I live, he will not die," she says.
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