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NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nearly half of all Americans older than 65 will spend some time in a nursing home, a statistic that overshadows the wish of most seniors to spend their final days in their real homes. The nursing-home stay may be for just a short while, or it could be longer if chronic health conditions dictate. Like it or not, it is that inevitability that makes the selection of a nursing home so important and difficult. One of the best tools available to help make a choice is Medicare's Web site, www.medicare.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
One day last winter, Marion A. Torrence woke up in St. Joseph's Hospital on Girard Avenue, an apparent mugging victim. "They told me I was burned about the head and on the shoulder. They told me I'd been struck. I don't even remember. Someone brought me to the hospital, but I don't know who. " Torrence, 87, was living alone in her North Philadelphia home. For 43 years, she'd shared the house with her husband. But since his death 14 years ago, she'd been alone. "Unfortunately, we had no children," she said.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of Tucker House, a financially ailing nursing home at 10th and Wallace Streets, plan to close the nine-year-old home next month unless they receive emergency relief. Tucker House spokesmen yesterday confirmed that they already had started to move patients to other nursing homes in the area, adding that they would continue to do so until all 181 patients had been relocated. "It's very unfortunate. Most of the patients and employees have been here nine years," said Paula Burroughs, the administrator of Tucker House.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a 77-year-old woman yesterday sued a Philadelphia nursing home, alleging that the home illegally demanded more than $24,000 before it would admit her in 1984 and then discharged her without a hearing, violating her constitutional rights. Officials of the Golden Slipper Uptown Home for the Aged, at 7800 Bustleton Ave., contended that the woman, Jessie Eisenberg, is aggressive and a danger to the other residents of the 236-bed nursing home. To her family, Eisenberg is the victim of a system that demands illegal "up-front payments" before admitting people into a nursing home and then allows nursing-home operators to discharge residents without a hearing, in violation of their constitutional rights.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The General Accounting Office yesterday reported that the majority of private nursing-home insurance policies being sold have serious gaps, including policy restrictions and limitations designed to reduce benefits to consumers. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, also said that a lack of standards and marketing requirements has increased the potential for abuses by unscrupulous salespeople and companies in the long-term-care market. Unlike the market for Medigap policies, which are sold to the elderly to provide medical care not covered by Medicare, there are no federal guidelines for policies that cover nursing-home or home-health care.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Suburban General Hospital in East Norriton Township has begun construction of a $7.5 million nursing home on its grounds to fill a need for nursing-home beds in Montgomery County. The home is expected to be the only skilled nursing facility affiliated with a hospital in the Norristown area, according to spokeswoman Cindy Forbes Raquet. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held yesterday. Bill Janssen, Suburban's vice president of finance, said the hospital, at 2701 DeKalb Pike, has never had a nursing home and "always thought it could finish off our total package.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael R. Walker's mission as head of Genesis Health Ventures, a nursing- home chain based in Kennett Square, is to eliminate society's stereotypical attitude toward nursing-home residents. His mission is not going unnoticed, not even by President Reagan. On Wednesday, the company received an award in Washington under a presidential program for private sector initiative. The award was given to the company in recognition of its innovative approach to bringing together the educational needs of nursing-home residents and of students looking for ways to practice their teaching skills.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
Rugby Road in Haverford Township is the kind of place where neighbors borrow sugar, hold block parties, even take vacations together. "A lot of neighborhoods, it can be years before you get to know your neighbors," said Tad Sperry, who moved there two years ago. "I can walk down the street and talk to anybody. You get to be pretty good friends here. " But Sperry and others say that one homeowner on the block - state Rep. Richard A. McClatchy Jr. (R., Montgomery County) - has been less than neighborly.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ida Ritthaler, at 86, and Frances Lieberman, at 90, are smiling more. They have been untied. The two residents of different Philadelphia nursing homes had been restrained to immovable objects for several years by well-meaning people who wanted to protect them. Their confinement was ironic. Traveling was in Ida Ritthaler's blood. Beginning in 1929, when she fled her depression-ridden home town in Germany's Black Forest, she had hopscotched the Atlantic, sometimes once a year.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Brooks Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Smoking, littering, and wildly driving students are terrorizing the residents of a nursing home across from Downingtown High School, according to the facility's top administrator. "We have elderly people here who get frightened at the students' behavior," said Colleen Frankenfield, head administrator of St. Martha Manor, a 120-bed long-term-care facility. "To be honest, we're concerned somebody here is going to get hurt. " Frankenfield said students distressed residents and their elderly visitors by gathering in the nursing-home parking lot to smoke and hang out before and after school.
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BUSINESS
June 9, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
NewCourtland Senior Services Inc. used to be Philadelphia's biggest nursing home operator. Now it is gearing up to keep people out of the city's 7,500 nursing home beds. In January, it paid $2.1 million for the former Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute in East Falls, to make it senior housing, and it's aiming to expand to Northeast Philadelphia. This all comes after selling five of its six nursing homes in 2011. Unlike many similar groups, NewCourtland has money, from the 1995 sale of Presbyterian Hospital to the University of Pennsylvania for $88 million.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last year, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office dropped subpoenas on dozens of nursing homes statewide, demanding facts about their staffing - an opening salvo in a probe that could force the homes to pay big fines. The office says the process will improve conditions and pay off for the state's elderly. Someone else could benefit, too - the Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll law firm. The Washington firm stands to pocket up to $21 million of the first $100 million of any fines extracted by state prosecutors.
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maude Freeman Coles and seven of her girlfriends began their monthly get-togethers when they were teenagers at Palmyra High School. They played bridge, four players at each of two tables, and rotated as hosts from house to house. When ill health subtracted two of them, they became six at one table, playing a card game now lost to memory. "They called themselves the Sixers," Mrs. Coles' daughter, Carol Graf, said. When Mrs. Coles was 92, the card games ended, but she and five friends still got together once a year for lunch at her home.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether Mom still wants sex probably isn't top-of-mind when most people are picking a nursing home for their loved one. But experts from the Widener University-based Sexuality and Aging Consortium say a groundbreaking Iowa court case illustrates why both consumers and long-term care facilities should do more thinking about sex - before they get into trouble. In the case, Henry Rayhons, a 78-year-old former member of the Iowa House of Representatives, is charged with sexual abuse for having sex with his wife of seven years in her nursing home.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even in nursing homes, where hundreds of thousands of people die each year, death has long been a touchy subject. Administrators thought they were doing residents and staff a psychological favor by whisking dead bodies out back doors and carrying on as usual. It seemed too depressing to think about how many people were leaving and how many would follow. Attitudes are beginning to change, though, thanks to a greater emphasis on bringing meaning and individual choice - in other words, more life - to those last years in long-term care.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Michael Vitez and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Wolf said Friday that he wants to help 5,500 more Pennsylvania seniors get caregiving services in their own homes rather than in nursing homes, and promised to make the approval process for home health care much faster. Wolf said his plan, a mixture of budget, legislative, and executive actions, would offer more choices and "protect our seniors to make sure they go through their senior years with dignity. " The proposals are to be included in the budget he will release Tuesday.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Instead of paying her now-93-year-old cousin's nursing home and medical bills, a 79-year-old woman from Gloucester County spent more than $200,000 of the cousin's life savings to buy lottery tickets for herself, the state Attorney General's Office said. Doris Litle of Deptford was indicted Monday, charged by a state grand jury with theft by deception and Medicaid fraud. Over five years, Litle stole $214,450 from her cousin, the Attorney General's Office said. Given power of attorney in July 2005, Litle was supposed to manage her cousin's finances, including the bank account with the life savings from which she stole, authorities said.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOYCE SAPP was curious about her family background, and discovered that she had some Apache back there. And she joined with a man who had Cherokee in his family background. A lot of African-Americans discover some American Indian ancestry if they care to dig deeply into it. And Joyce did. Her interest in both American Indian and African-American history became a passion, and she enjoyed reading about it and passing her knowledge on to her children and grandchildren. Joyce D. Sapp, who worked for many years in nursing homes, mostly in the suburbs where she found satisfaction in helping senior citizens, died of cancer on Jan. 21. She was 69 and was living in Atlanta, but had lived most of her life in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 2, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN A MAN named Cornelius arrived at the home of Paul and Anne Mae Balmer in West Philadelphia, he was comatose, almost zombielike. All the life seemed to have been taken out of him by the institutions that had lodged him before he became a member of the Balmer household. But it wasn't long before Cornelius responded to the care and compassion he received in that remarkable household. "Before long, we were joking and laughing with him," said Shanta, the youngest member of the family.
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