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NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nearly half of all Americans older than 65 will spend some time in a nursing home, a statistic that overshadows the wish of most seniors to spend their final days in their real homes. The nursing-home stay may be for just a short while, or it could be longer if chronic health conditions dictate. Like it or not, it is that inevitability that makes the selection of a nursing home so important and difficult. One of the best tools available to help make a choice is Medicare's Web site, www.medicare.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
One day last winter, Marion A. Torrence woke up in St. Joseph's Hospital on Girard Avenue, an apparent mugging victim. "They told me I was burned about the head and on the shoulder. They told me I'd been struck. I don't even remember. Someone brought me to the hospital, but I don't know who. " Torrence, 87, was living alone in her North Philadelphia home. For 43 years, she'd shared the house with her husband. But since his death 14 years ago, she'd been alone. "Unfortunately, we had no children," she said.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of Tucker House, a financially ailing nursing home at 10th and Wallace Streets, plan to close the nine-year-old home next month unless they receive emergency relief. Tucker House spokesmen yesterday confirmed that they already had started to move patients to other nursing homes in the area, adding that they would continue to do so until all 181 patients had been relocated. "It's very unfortunate. Most of the patients and employees have been here nine years," said Paula Burroughs, the administrator of Tucker House.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a 77-year-old woman yesterday sued a Philadelphia nursing home, alleging that the home illegally demanded more than $24,000 before it would admit her in 1984 and then discharged her without a hearing, violating her constitutional rights. Officials of the Golden Slipper Uptown Home for the Aged, at 7800 Bustleton Ave., contended that the woman, Jessie Eisenberg, is aggressive and a danger to the other residents of the 236-bed nursing home. To her family, Eisenberg is the victim of a system that demands illegal "up-front payments" before admitting people into a nursing home and then allows nursing-home operators to discharge residents without a hearing, in violation of their constitutional rights.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The General Accounting Office yesterday reported that the majority of private nursing-home insurance policies being sold have serious gaps, including policy restrictions and limitations designed to reduce benefits to consumers. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, also said that a lack of standards and marketing requirements has increased the potential for abuses by unscrupulous salespeople and companies in the long-term-care market. Unlike the market for Medigap policies, which are sold to the elderly to provide medical care not covered by Medicare, there are no federal guidelines for policies that cover nursing-home or home-health care.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Suburban General Hospital in East Norriton Township has begun construction of a $7.5 million nursing home on its grounds to fill a need for nursing-home beds in Montgomery County. The home is expected to be the only skilled nursing facility affiliated with a hospital in the Norristown area, according to spokeswoman Cindy Forbes Raquet. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held yesterday. Bill Janssen, Suburban's vice president of finance, said the hospital, at 2701 DeKalb Pike, has never had a nursing home and "always thought it could finish off our total package.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael R. Walker's mission as head of Genesis Health Ventures, a nursing- home chain based in Kennett Square, is to eliminate society's stereotypical attitude toward nursing-home residents. His mission is not going unnoticed, not even by President Reagan. On Wednesday, the company received an award in Washington under a presidential program for private sector initiative. The award was given to the company in recognition of its innovative approach to bringing together the educational needs of nursing-home residents and of students looking for ways to practice their teaching skills.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
Rugby Road in Haverford Township is the kind of place where neighbors borrow sugar, hold block parties, even take vacations together. "A lot of neighborhoods, it can be years before you get to know your neighbors," said Tad Sperry, who moved there two years ago. "I can walk down the street and talk to anybody. You get to be pretty good friends here. " But Sperry and others say that one homeowner on the block - state Rep. Richard A. McClatchy Jr. (R., Montgomery County) - has been less than neighborly.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ida Ritthaler, at 86, and Frances Lieberman, at 90, are smiling more. They have been untied. The two residents of different Philadelphia nursing homes had been restrained to immovable objects for several years by well-meaning people who wanted to protect them. Their confinement was ironic. Traveling was in Ida Ritthaler's blood. Beginning in 1929, when she fled her depression-ridden home town in Germany's Black Forest, she had hopscotched the Atlantic, sometimes once a year.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Brooks Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Smoking, littering, and wildly driving students are terrorizing the residents of a nursing home across from Downingtown High School, according to the facility's top administrator. "We have elderly people here who get frightened at the students' behavior," said Colleen Frankenfield, head administrator of St. Martha Manor, a 120-bed long-term-care facility. "To be honest, we're concerned somebody here is going to get hurt. " Frankenfield said students distressed residents and their elderly visitors by gathering in the nursing-home parking lot to smoke and hang out before and after school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Estelle Kane Roberts, 91, an Elkins Park resident and former owner of a gift shop there, died Wednesday, April 6, of complications from a stroke at a nursing home in Boca Raton, Fla. Mrs. Roberts was owner-operator of the Pink Daisy, a store catering to high-end customers in search of fine china and home decor for weddings and other special occasions. Mrs. Roberts started the business in the basement of her sister's home in Huntingdon Valley in 1970, and moved it to a store in Rockledge and then to Old York Road in Elkins Park.
NEWS
March 12, 2016
Aging baby boomers in Pennsylvania thought they were being careful planners when they bought long-term-care insurance to cover future nursing home expenses and end-of-life costs while protecting their assets. Boy, were they wrong. The insurance companies they paid premiums to now say they can't afford the policies and want consumers to bail them out. Four companies want rate hikes ranging from 14 percent to 130 percent, depending on the coverage. The increases would affect 75,000 Pennsylvanians.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has entered into a settlement agreement concerning resident care at one of its former nursing homes in South Philadelphia, the U.S. Attorney's Office announced Tuesday. In the agreement between the Archdiocese's Catholic Health Care Services and the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia, the archdiocese has agreed to improve or has already improved resident care at St. Monica Center for Rehabilitation and Healthcare, at 2509 S. Fourth St. Areas of concern related to physician orders, wound care, medication administration, documentation of care, and transfer and toileting of residents, the U.S. Attorney's Office said in a news release.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Sheila-Rea York warmly welcomed a visitor to the immaculate cottage in Mount Airy, then provided blue hospital-style shoe covers and antibacterial soap for hand washing. She led the way to the bedroom and proudly introduced the focus of her life - her mother, Dorothy York, 86. The octogenarian was propped up in a hospital bed, wearing a floral lilac nightgown. She can't walk and is disabled by many infirmities, including dementia. "I'm real old," she said when asked her age. "They used to change people's age way back to get jobs and all, and I'm older than they say. " Aside, Rea York murmured, "My mother says she's 129 years old. " Rea York fits the National Alliance for Caregiving's profile of a "higher-hour" caregiver: a fiftysomething woman who spends an average of 62 hours a week bathing, dressing, nursing, running errands, communicating with doctors, and managing the finances of an adult family member.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Steve and Mia
Q: The guy I'm seeing told me that he would like it if I tongue-kissed another girl. At first, I thought no. But now I'm starting to think it's no big deal and am thinking of doing it to shock him on his birthday. Me and her have been friends for a long time, and I'm pretty sure she would think it was fun, too. One of my other friends thinks I'm wrong, but I don't see why. What do you think? Steve: Listen to the Jill Sobule song "I Kissed a Girl. " That's exactly what I think. Mia: He's grooming you. Think about it: Say, you kiss a girl just because dude thinks it's hot. What will he have you do next?
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Q: What is the Medicare Five-Star Rating System for Nursing Homes? A: Many elderly adults have their first encounter with a skilled-nursing facility after a sudden health event and hospitalization. A hospital discharge planner arranges for transfer to a skilled-nursing facility, but that facility may be far from family and may not provide the best care. To that end, Medicare launched the Five Star Quality Rating as a way to improve consumers' understanding of nursing home quality. Medicare uses three factors for rating: the inspections for the previous three years, including number of complaint surveys and follow-up inspections; the type and amount of nursing staff; and quality measures of care, including pressure ulcers, falls with significant injury, reports of pain, and the number of people who receive antipsychotic medications.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
The day I'd been dreading arrived. The best I could hope for was that it wouldn't rain. It was seven months since my mother died of cancer. When her sturdy, yet worn, two-bedroom rowhouse in Mayfair sold in the fall, I was thrust into the inescapable and forlorn duty of cleaning out her house. An only child, I've been responsible for settling her affairs. Even though my name was on the deed, I always considered it my mom's home. After I bought the house, I lived in it only a few years before I married.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Bettemarie Bond is an overcomer. She went to college, worked full-time as an occupational therapist, and bought a house in Levittown, despite rare disorders that require her to have all nourishment and medication pumped round-the-clock into a vein in her heart. But last summer, when declining health forced her to go on disability at age 45, she faced a problem that floored her. Bond discovered that she would qualify for Medicare this month. Unlike the private health insurance she had through her job, however, the government insurer would not cover her costly intravenous therapy at home, only in a medical facility.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Rich, easy notes slide out of Gilly DiBenedetto's clarinet, filling the room, until the old man stops and lowers his instrument. "I can't play no more," he says in a whisper brittle enough to make it sound like the truth. Then he promptly moistens his lips, raises the clarinet, and resumes the tune. It seems more likely that DiBenedetto can't not play - even against the odds. Once the band director at the storied Downingtown Inn, to which Mickey Rooney lent his name and presence, the 87-year-old was supposed to be gone by now. Battling three cancers, he was given two months to live in July.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yvonne Wagner Purdue, 62, of Cedar Brook, Winslow Township, a registered nurse who was a branch manager at Virtua Home Health Care in Mount Laurel from 2003 until earlier this year, died of cancer Monday, Oct. 26, at her home. Mrs. Purdue's agency managed "continuity of care following hospital discharge" of patients, she wrote in autobiographical notes. "She managed teams of 10 to 15 registered nurses, a pretty active manager," son Steven C. Purdue said. "Every time she took over a new team," he said, the scores for patient satisfaction "went up to 98 percent, pretty consistently.
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