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Nursing School

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NEWS
October 6, 1991 | By Phillip Wilhite, Special to The Inquirer
Camden County College soon may have a new nursing school to house its expanding program. A resolution passed Tuesday by the Camden County College Board of Trustees would allow for the construction of a $5 million nursing school on the Blackwood campus at no cost to taxpayers. The new facility would measure 36,000 square feet and would replace the existing nursing school at West Jersey Hospital in Camden. The proposal was approved Wednesday by West Jersey Health Systems, owner of the hospital.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a nationwide trend, hospital-based nursing school programs in the Northeast showed a healthy increase in enrollments this year, according to officials. Enrollment at Frankford Hospital's School of Nursing rose 45 percent over the previous year of 110 students, according to Marian Walkowski-Mote, associate director of the hospital's nursing school, Frankford Avenue and Wakeling Street. Nazareth Hospital, which has a small, 24-month master's program in nurse anesthesiology, has 17 students this year - a 42 percent increase from the 12 students in 1988, said Bill Discavage, program director at the school, 2601 Holme Ave. These statistics reflect a national turnaround that began last year, reversing the downward trend of 1983 to 1987, when enrollment dropped almost a third, according to a Nursingworld Journal survey released earlier this year.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ALL CHANEL Jacobs wanted was to be a registered nurse. The South Philadelphia woman withdrew from Community College of Philadelphia, which had a waiting list for nursing, after she got accepted into a 15-month program at Jersey College School of Nursing in May. But instead of getting her license, Jacobs claims she has been cheated out of her education - and $29,000. Jacobs claimed the school failed her and several other students five times on the final exam but never showed them their scores and later accused them of cheating.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Stewart is on the verge of a major career change, and the state of Pennsylvania is delighted. Since 1981, when he graduated from Norristown High School, Stewart has worked as a janitor. He has two jobs, one of them at Norristown State Hospital, a sprawling 966-bed psychiatric institution, the other at an emergency mental health service not far away. The work is fine if not thrilling, Stewart said. He might have continued on his current course, he said, had he not gone to a meeting a few weeks ago held by Norristown State Hospital's personnel department.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By SHAYLA MORALES ROBINSON
'HOW ARE you going to go back to school with six babies and a mother and aunt who are fighting cancer? You're crazy!" Those were the words I constantly heard when contemplating nursing school. With five children under the age of 4 and against all odds, I started nursing school at La Salle University. My only motivation has been my children and that so many women give up at their dreams when they are a single parent. I have one boy and five girls (two sets of twins). They range in age from 5 to 13 years old. Two days after starting nursing school, I married my longtime fiancé.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen years ago, the Lankenau Hospital School of Nursing could hardly keep pace with the local demand for nursing education. It was accepting 80 students per class for its three-year diploma program, maintaining a healthy waiting list of prospective candidates and turning away more than a few applicants. It also was well on its way to training more than 3,000 nurses. But times have changed for the hospital-based school in Lower Merion Township, which three months ago celebrated the 90th anniversary of its founding by seven Lutheran deaconesses from Iserlohn, Westphalia, who had been trained in the fashion of the first modern nurse, Florence Nightingale.
NEWS
October 9, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gwynedd-Mercy College has received a $5 million gift - the largest from an alumnus - from Frances M. Maguire, a 1955 graduate, to name the school's nursing program, officials announced yesterday. The gift, creating the Frances M. Maguire School of Nursing, was unveiled at a board of trustees meeting this week. It comes two weeks before the nursing school celebrates its 50th anniversary. "I have always been a believer in remembering where I came from and giving back in some way to those who have helped me to get where I am today," Maguire, of Wyndmoor, said in a statement.
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marcella Singleton, 16, was sitting in the principal's office at William Penn High School yesterday morning when two women dressed in crisp summer suits edged into the room. Peggy Sinnott, director of nursing at Mercy Catholic Medical Center in Darby, and Lisa Lewis, the center's nursing recruiter, along with school principal Odette Harris, had a surprise for the hard-working sophomore, who dreams of becoming a registered nurse: She had been awarded a $3,000 grant to enter nursing school in two years.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nothing like a recession and its lingering aftermath to deflate a dream. Cutting back on hours as a medical secretary to juggle work, raise a family, and pursue her associate degree in nursing seemed like a good idea to Marianne Pecora in 2006, when her husband, a construction worker, was getting plenty of work. But by the time she graduated in December 2011 with her two-year nursing degree, everything had changed. The predicted shortage of nurses never materialized. All those baby-boomer nurses who were supposed to retire stayed put, their retirement savings cut by the recession.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At 27, Brenden D. Garozzo will be a spring chicken among some tougher birds as the administrator of Gloucester County's Shady Lane Nursing Home. Last week, the county Board of Freeholders appointed Garozzo, of East Greenwich Township, to the job of overseeing the 120-bed long-term-care home, which is the county government's largest unit. "I'm anxious to work with the residents and I'm anxious to work with the staff," Garozzo said. "I've heard nothing but good things about Shady Lane.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Kay Gibbons, 76, of Philadelphia, a nurse and lifelong caregiver for friends, neighbors and family, died Sunday, May 3, of cancer at home. Mrs. Gibbons, whose maiden name was Kearney, was at various times a working nurse, corporate nurse, and visitor to the sick and homebound. Her family, though, joked that she also practiced "whole listic" nursing - as she had a whole list of remedies from a lifetime of experience. She could recommend an herbal product or over-the-counter item for whatever was ailing anyone.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Facebook, Philadelphia Police Officer Sean O'Malley has described the federal corruption trial of six of his drug squad colleagues as a "kangaroo court. " He can't wait, he wrote, to see his brothers in blue set free. And as he took the stand as a defense witness Tuesday, he aimed to deflate the most damning allegations against them. The $13,800 prosecutors said the indicted officers stole from a West Philadelphia home? O'Malley said he was the one who seized the money. The meth peddler in the Northeast who accused the drug squad of framing him?
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
FOUR CHILDREN were rescued by firefighters yesterday afternoon after their mother allegedly punished them by locking them overnight in the basement of their Kensington home. The kids - a 13-year-old boy and three girls, ages 9, 10 and 12 - were discovered about 1:30 p.m. when they called police on a cellphone. Firefighters had to enter the house on Atlantic Street near Jasper through a second-floor window. Neighbors were stunned by the allegations. They said the mother, who they believe works at Philadelphia International Airport and attends nursing school, had never done anything to raise questions about the treatment of her children.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Center City man who was going to nursing school while working as a pimp pleaded guilty Thursday to third-degree murder in the 2013 death and dismemberment of a john he had set up to be robbed. With five jurors selected for his trial in Common Pleas Court and two prostitutes prepared to testify against him, Keith "King" Tolbert decided to take a plea deal that will put him in prison for 22 to 44 years. Tolbert, 35, will be sentenced Friday by Judge J. Scott O'Keefe. His attorney, Mary T. Maran, said Tolbert wants to express his remorse to the family of Francis Zarzycki, 40, and tell authorities where he dumped the victim's missing body parts.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ALL CHANEL Jacobs wanted was to be a registered nurse. The South Philadelphia woman withdrew from Community College of Philadelphia, which had a waiting list for nursing, after she got accepted into a 15-month program at Jersey College School of Nursing in May. But instead of getting her license, Jacobs claims she has been cheated out of her education - and $29,000. Jacobs claimed the school failed her and several other students five times on the final exam but never showed them their scores and later accused them of cheating.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is full of forlorn former corporate buildings and a few healthy, expansive institutions looking for space, like Drexel University. Sometimes they meet and match. Drexel's nursing school is happy in the high-rise ex-headquarters of the former Pennwalt Corp. and the departed Reliance Insurance Co. at Three Parkway. But supply and demand in this town don't always meet at those happy points where a deal works. Someday, Drexel would like to consolidate its legacy medical campuses, which surround Hahnemann University Hospital on North Broad Street and the former Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania , five miles away in East Falls, to a single modern complex, presumably close to Hahnemann if it continues to serve as Drexel's teaching hospital.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faith Jerome, 76, of Cherry Hill, a longtime nurse and member of the township's school board, died Monday, Dec. 22, at home of pancreatic cancer. When a local school was slated to close in the early 1980s, a friend persuaded Mrs. Jerome to run for the Cherry Hill school board. Fifteen years later, when she decided against seeking a sixth term, former board member James Marino told The Inquirer that "she has great integrity. . . . I can't think of a decision she ever made that she didn't feel she was doing in the best interest of the children of Cherry Hill.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN KATHLEEN Young came to Philadelphia from a small town in North Carolina to attend nursing school, it had to have been something of a culture shock. But rather than being cowed or changed by the clash of environments, Kathleen adjusted, got married, had five children and reveled in the artistic opportunities available in an urban setting. She brought her Southern charm and graciousness with her, and they never deserted her. Kathleen Troncelliti, as she became after marrying world-renowned surgeon Manrico A. Troncelliti, a tireless volunteer in numerous charitable and civic endeavors, devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, died Sept.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miriam McAlister Lundgren was more than a nursing executive in Camden and Philadelphia in the 1960s and 1970s. She wrote in an autobiography that she was "the first woman ordained Elder in the Southern New Jersey Conference" of the United Methodist Church. It was in that post-nursing role that she impressed Louise Harkins, a longtime friend. "My husband and I are in ministry" in the Make A Joyful Noise Ministries in Medford and Pleasantville, Harkins said, "and we connected at pastoral lunches" for folks from several denominations in the 1990s.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County College is no more. In its place stands a new name, playing off the brand name of a nearby university and reflecting the growth of the community college: Rowan College at Gloucester County. Lawmakers and county officials joined the college's administrators and staff Tuesday for a celebration of the school's new branding. Among the speakers: State Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester), State Sen. Donald Norcross (D., Camden), Rowan University president Ali A. Houshmand, Rowan trustees' chair Linda Rohrer, and Rowan College president Frederick Keating.
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