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NEWS
November 29, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a game of telephone gone haywire, the story came out a few days ago that Nazareth Hospital had laid off all its nursing supervisors and then rehired some in lower positions. Well, says James Martin, vice president of institutional services at the hospital, what actually happened was this: The hospital, at 2601 Holme Ave., simply reorganized its nursing staff because of reductions in the number of inpatient beds. Nazareth cut its number of nursing supervisors from 16 to 12. It offered other jobs to the four, either as staff nurses or charge nurses, who oversee floors.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | By Jody Benjamin and Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Days after cutting more than 40 jobs, administrators at Rancocas Hospital in Willingboro and Zurbrugg Hospital in Riverside are asking the nursing staff to discuss possible cuts, a nurses union official said yesterday. According to Barbara Conklin, labor representative for JNESO, a regional union that represents the 400 nurses working at the two Burlington County hospitals, the request was discussed at a meeting called by the administration Friday. About a week earlier, the hospitals laid off 16 clerical and technical workers, and a week before that, in late October, 15 management personnel lost their jobs and 10 other management positions that were either unfilled or to be lost through retirement were eliminated.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Public school students are not the only ones affected by West Chester's plan to cut back its nursing staff. So too are the four parochial schools and one private school located within the West Chester Area School District. Bishop Shanahan, because of its size, would probably retain its school nurse under the proposed plan to cut the nursing staff from 21 to 10. West Chester Friends School and three parochial elementary schools - Saint Agnes, SS. Philip and James, and SS. Simon and Jude - would share nurses.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Amy Linn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norristown State Hospital, which failed a federal inspection last fall because it was understaffed, has passed a second inspection and is now fully in compliance with federal standards, a state Department of Public Welfare official said yesterday. "We have hired about 25 additional nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and psychiatric aides," said Matt Jones, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Welfare. Jones said the hospital was continuing to "recruit staff in all three areas" so that it would have nursing staff in reserve.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
Administrators in the William Penn School District say they have found enough money in next year's budget to pay for a new in-school suspension program at Penn Wood High School and add nursing staff at three secondary schools. Interim Superintendent David Campbell had said previously that, while the items were needed, he was leaving them out of the proposed budget, which called for a 39-mill real estate tax hike. District spokeswoman Lillian Spangler said the programs would cost $55,000 - $40,000 for an experienced teacher to run the suspension program and $15,000 to ensure that nursing staff is available at each secondary school every school day. The money was found when administrators added up how many teachers are retiring this year, and calculated how much in salaries would be saved on their less-experienced replacements, Spangler said.
NEWS
September 28, 2004 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police issued an arrest warrant yesterday for a 53-year-old traveling nurse, Joan Wood Barnes of Philadelphia, on charges that she cut the feeding tubes of six patients at the Philadelphia Nursing Home in Fairmount. Barnes had worked at the nursing home for the last year through an agency called MedStaff, said Sgt. Anthony McFadden of the Philadelphia Police Department's Central Detective Division. He said her contract expires Friday and the nursing home was not going to renew it. "It just led to her, and we had enough for an affidavit," McFadden said.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Stavis, a physician and director of the highly ranked neonatal intensive-care unit at Bryn Mawr Hospital, was as proud as a new father this week as he settled into new quarters at the hospital. He and his nine-member nursing staff had more than twice the floor space they had before for 20 beds or incubators, respirators, overhead heaters, rows of monitors and other equipment needed to care for critically ill infants. They also had a nursing station large enough for Stavis and the nurses to sit at without constantly elbowing each other.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
All you ever wanted to know about Edith Cook's hospital stay was just a push of a button away. When Cook was taken to the hospital in the middle of the night Sept. 18 after complaining of shortness of breath, she was placed in the intermediate care unit at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County in Mount Holly. From her bed, she noticed a screen on the wall, flanked by a device that resembled a dust-buster. "I did notice it when I came in the room," she said. "It was in the spot that a (bulletin)
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
To explain why Philadelphia Nursing Home failed its annual state inspection, city Health Department officials pointed to a 19 percent decrease in the city-run facility's work force since July. The nursing home, which serves the elderly poor as well as AIDS patients, was banned from admitting new patients for at least 45 days after state inspectors two weeks ago found the facility's housekeeping and dietary departments understaffed and "deficient. " The employees, particularly the nursing staff and workers in food service and housekeeping, took advantage of the mayor's early retirement incentive plan, reducing the staff from 545 to 439. Because of the city's hiring freeze, no replacement employees could be hired for the facility at Girard and Corinthian avenues in Fairmount.
NEWS
July 31, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Blanche C. Lees Faul, 49, vice president for patient-care services at Sacred Heart Hospital in Allentown, Pa., died Monday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia from a massive stroke. A Westampton resident for the last 20 years, she previously resided in Willingboro. She was born in Philadelphia and raised in the Kensington section. A health-care executive for more than 20 years, Mrs. Faul joined Sacred Heart Hospital in Allentown last year. She was responsible for coordinating services and increasing efficiency in patient-care areas, and for administering the nursing staff, said Paul Joly, vice president for public relations for Sacred Heart.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Margaret J. Franck, 68, of Ardmore, a nursing teacher and administrator who was an account manager at McKesson Corp. in Mount Laurel from 1997 to 2006, died of cancer on Sunday, Sept. 2, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. She traveled for McKesson to England several times and in 1998 to Hong Kong to demonstrate medical software to health professionals, her husband, Richard G. Bickel, director of planning for the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, said. "I met the four or five people in her group, a team that did demos all over," Bickel said, even in Canada's Yukon Territory.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan C. Gallagher Smith, 92, formerly of Narberth, a World War II veteran and retired nurse, died of complications from pneumonia Tuesday, Dec. 27, in ManorCare Nursing Center in Boulder, Colo. The daughter of Irish immigrants, Mrs. Smith grew up in Narberth. She graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic High School for Girls in 1936 and from Misericordia Hospital School of Nursing in West Philadelphia in 1941. During World War II, as a lieutenant in the Navy Nurse Corps, she cared for wounded sailors and soldiers in military hospitals in Florida, Washington, Texas, and Philadelphia.
SPORTS
December 1, 2010 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
Blessed by Paco: Five survivors cherish gifts of life from boxer DEATH WAS NEAR. They told her that. Chances were it could be weeks - perhaps longer but not significantly unless she had a lung transplant. For years, Ashley Owens had known that she would not live to be 30 or even 25, that cystic fibrosis would sweep her away one day before she would have a chance to have a career or a wedding or children. It was a given she had come to accept. But now that she was coughing up blood and was in what her doctors called the "the end stages," the sudden finality of her circumstances terrified her. All of it seemed to be happening too soon.
NEWS
October 19, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jean Eleanor Lockwood Wagner, 90, a nurse who assisted her surgeon husband, died of heart failure Oct. 10 at Waverly Heights, a retirement community in Gladwyne. A native of Tamaqua, Pa., Mrs. Wagner earned a nursing degree from Jefferson Medical College Hospital and completed the Nursing Course of Study at the University of Pennsylvania. While on the nursing staff of what is now Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, she met her future husband, surgeon Frederick B. Wagner Jr. They married in 1945.
NEWS
October 17, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol Schnabel Reed, 62, of Haddonfield, a nurse and childbirth expert who taught thousands of parents how to care for their babies, died Sunday of breast cancer at Hahnemann University Hospital. For 25 years, Mrs. Reed conducted "Baby and Me" sessions and taught always-booked classes for expectant parents at Virtua Hospital in Voorhees. The mother of eight, she conducted Lamaze childbirth classes from home when her children were young. Though she never took drugs during their births, she advised other women to get epidurals for pain, her daughter Amanda said.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | Reviewed by Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Air We Breathe By Andrea Barrett 297 pp. W.W. Norton. $25 Andrea Barrett is a lyrical novelist of the American past, giving life to pioneers in science with such resonance that even readers who wrestled mightily with chemistry come away entranced by her evocative accounts of discovery. The winner of a MacArthur fellowship and the National Book Award (for the 1996 short-story collection Ship Fever) and a Pulitzer finalist (for the 2003 Servants of the Map), Barrett is taken with an earlier time, when the country was much smaller and exploration - pushing boundaries in science, geography and knowledge - mattered far more than it does today.
NEWS
August 5, 2007 | By John Sullivan and Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Tennessee regulators have concluded that a center for troubled children needlessly provoked the confrontation that led to the death in June of a 17-year-old Philadelphia teen. The Chad Youth Enhancement Center in Ashland City "violated its own policy and procedures" in subduing Omega Leach, social-service regulators said. The state said a Chad staffer should have given Leach space to calm down June 2 when Leach had retreated to a dorm after a fight with another resident. Instead, the staffer, Randall D. Rae, 22, ordered Leach to leave the dorm, and Leach attacked him. The worker then forced Leach prone on the floor, face-down, and the teenager lost consciousness.
NEWS
September 28, 2004 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police issued an arrest warrant yesterday for a 53-year-old traveling nurse, Joan Wood Barnes of Philadelphia, on charges that she cut the feeding tubes of six patients at the Philadelphia Nursing Home in Fairmount. Barnes had worked at the nursing home for the last year through an agency called MedStaff, said Sgt. Anthony McFadden of the Philadelphia Police Department's Central Detective Division. He said her contract expires Friday and the nursing home was not going to renew it. "It just led to her, and we had enough for an affidavit," McFadden said.
NEWS
November 1, 2002
Nurse shortages have varied, complex causes Dr. Henry Shenkin's claim that the closure of hospital nursing schools created nurse shortages is both misleading and historically inaccurate (letter, "Cause of nurse shortage," Oct. 29). He errs in the assumption that hospital schools supplied sufficient graduates to meet nurse demand. At the same time that large numbers of diploma programs existed, the country was also in the midst of a tremendous nursing shortage. Dr. Shenkin fails to point out that 40 years ago the nursing staff of many hospitals consisted predominantly of student nurses delivering care for which they were not qualified.
NEWS
September 12, 2002
When doctors, nurses and other medical volunteers rushed to Manhattan a year ago yesterday, many were shocked to find so few people to rescue. The fate of thousands caught in the World Trade Center was to escape largely unharmed or to perish. That day, nurses were abundant. That's often what happens in a crisis. On America's hospital wards every day, though, the mirror image - a shortage of nursing staff - threatens to become a crisis. Two recent reports on a nursing vacancy rate of about 12 percent in the nation's hospitals sharply increase the stakes for finding a cure - or temporary relief - to a perennial problem.
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