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NEWS
August 16, 1989 | By Phyllis Farkas Liebert, Special to the Daily News
With all the nutrition advice available to the public, some just-released findings of the Food and Drug Administration might surprise you: Teen-age girls and women from 25 to 65 routinely fall below 80 percent of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for more than half the eleven nutrients studied. The RDAs are minimum levels of nutrition generally accepted as necessary for good health. The results of the four-year study, which ended in 1986, were published in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pamela J. Gilchrist, 67, of Ivyland, who operated a health and nutrition business from her home for 31 years, died of brain cancer Thursday, Nov. 10, at home. Mrs. Gilchrist established Gilchrist Enterprise in 1980 as a distributor for Shaklee Corp. The firm's products include nutritional supplements, weight-management products, and beauty and household products. On her website, Mrs. Gilchrist explained how she got started in the business. In 1979, she was a stay-at-home mom when a friend gave her a sample of Shaklee's Basic-H, an organic cleaner.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | By Scott Schaffer and Duane Perry
Thousands of Philadelphians are suffering through a meltdown of society's nutrition supply system. Our inner-city communities often lack access to critical sources of food that the rest of us take for granted. This gap has led to widespread malnutrition, a problem for which all of society is paying a high price. After World War II, people and businesses left the city for the suburbs. The result: Philadelphia lost a third of its population, and those left behind are disproportionately the poorest of the poor.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Two athletes, whose faces decorate the backs of cereal boxes, were talking about bike maintenance, proper nutrition and the spirit of competition. Sixth grader Jordan Miller shot his hand up in the air. He wanted the bottom line. "How much money do you make for winning the race?" he asked the two visiting cyclists about next Sunday's CoreStates Championship race in Philadelphia. Jordan's question was one of many asked Tuesday by pupils at Joyce Kilmer Elementary School in Cherry Hill during a special assembly/clinic presented by Michael Vaarten and Mike Farrell of the Team Wheaties-Schwinn professional cycling team.
FOOD
March 6, 2003 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Be honest. Do you eat fewer than two meals a day? Are fruits, veggies and dairy foods rarely part of your meals? Has illness or discomfort changed the kind, or amount, of food you eat? Is it hard for you to shop, cook and/or feed yourself? Has a limited budget kept you from buying the food you need? Have you lost or gained 10 or more pounds - unintentionally - in the last six months? Do you take three or more different prescribed or over-the-counter drugs a day?
FOOD
September 10, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The Executive Success Diet (McGraw-Hill, $16.95) is more a nutritional diet book than a traditional cookbook. It deals with taking full control of your health through proper nutrition. It was written by syndicated columnist June Roth, who has a graduate degree in clinical nutrition, and Harvey M. Ross, a Los Angeles-based psychiatrist known for his contributions in the field of nutrient therapy. Roth and Ross present eight steps to health control, all based on getting proper nutrition and handling stress.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Emily Smith says she is confused about the fancy wording on food labels. "When I see a cake that says it's fat-free, I just don't believe it," said Smith, 71, of Mount Holly. "Or it'll say cholesterol free. I just don't know what it all means. " Smith and others can find out in a new video called Supermarket Savvy available at the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Service of Burlington County in Mount Holly. The video is designed to help shoppers like Smith, who may have particular health concerns, to shop more intelligently for food, according to Cheryl Stamato, a home economy program assistant for the service.
FOOD
October 5, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
The Center for Science in the Public Interest, a consumer group based in Washington that often criticizes food producers, has some honors to bestow. Its current newsletter honors several companies, organizations or governing bodies for their efforts in promoting good nutrition. The winners are: The Grand Union supermarket chain for offering natural beef, free of antibiotics, hormones or chemicals. Fort Jackson (S.C.) Army Basic Training Center for removing salt shakers, serving only low-fat milk and promoting good nutrition in its 27 dining halls.
FOOD
March 7, 1990 | The Inquirer staff
Four fast-food chains are breaking an agreement to offer on-the-spot nutritional information about their menus and to make sure that customers know the brochures are available, a consumer group has alleged. "We are sorry to report . . . that, after initial compliance, the voluntary program has broken down," the Center for Science in the Public Interest said in letters to the attorneys general of Texas, California and New York. The three state officials won agreement from five chains in July 1986 to provide ingredient and nutrition information at all outlets.
NEWS
August 14, 2009 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want your children to eat less? Let them serve themselves. They probably won't dole out a supersize portion on their own. Or pour drinks into tall, narrow glasses rather than short, wide ones; they'll think they are getting more (so will you). With Americans spending billions of dollars a year on fat-loss techniques ranging from celebrity diets to stomach-stapling surgery, the relatively new field of behavioral nutrition examines more down-to-earth questions. Can you reduce the attraction of sweets?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some recipes are sacrosanct, passed down on stained and creased index cards from one generation to the next. If you grew up on soul food, like Dejenaba Gordon did, collard greens is among them. "I've only known one way to cook collard greens: Boil it for hours with turkey or pork," she said. But last week, she stood up in front of a capacity crowd at the Free Library's Culinary Literacy Center and proposed something radical: Quickly saute the greens with caramelized onions, olive oil, and Dijon mustard, a compromise that preserves the nutrition and cuts out the saturated fat. The point wasn't to break with tradition, but to embrace it - while rethinking familiar flavors and ingredients in the context of 21st-century nutrition concerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014
BEING THE mother of a 6-year-old, I go to lots of children's birthday parties. I've been noticing a phenomenon called precocious puberty, which hits girls especially hard, though increasingly I've noticed it in boys, too. I'll find myself thinking, "Whoa! She's 7? She's developing breasts and looks like a little woman!" Or, "My goodness, he's 8 and already taller than me!" Witnessing this has made me curious and, along with other moms I talk with, I'm concerned, worried and bewildered.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the start of the life-or-death competition in the Hunger Games series, the contestants are presented with a cornucopia teeming with tools for their survival. The protagonist, Katniss Everdeen, is warned to steer clear. As much as she needs the resources, charging into the stockpile will put her in the throes of a savage competition for dominance. Those seeking the keys to a healthy diet these days face a similar predicament. Decades of studies have produced vast stores of data about the foods and nutrients likely to enhance and extend life.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eggland's Best L.L.C. has flown the coop. After seven years perched just off the Trooper Road exit of Route 422 in Montgomery County, the producer of higher-nutrition eggs, each stamped with a red EB , relocated its headquarters last month to Malvern. The move was to make way for a mixed-use development planned for the Trooper Road site and is not a sign of distress at EB, said Charles T. Lanktree, president and CEO. While the egg industry in general has had sales as flat as a crepe, EB's unit sales have been up double digits each of the last 17 years, an average of 14 percent each year, Lanktree said.
SPORTS
August 2, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
LeSean McCoy has stopped eating Doritos at midnight. That's part of the Eagles running back's emphasis on nutrition, which helped him drop four to seven pounds this offseason in an effort to become even quicker. McCoy led the NFL with 1,607 rushing yards last season, but apparently that was not enough. He wanted to be lighter. McCoy has trimmed down to about 209 pounds. "I felt like last year, even with the year I did have, it was based on guys up front really blocking well and [me]
FOOD
September 27, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
As the leisurely rhythms of summer give way to the more frantic routines of fall, those responsible for feeding a family have the challenge of navigating mealtimes around multiple schedules. I have always felt, and research bears out, that sitting down to eat, even for a few minutes, is better than eating in front of the fridge, or in the backseat of the car. Sit-down meals with others promote better eating habits, better relationships, and even better grades. So how can a busy family manage to eat healthy home-cooked meals here in the real world of competing priorities and overfilled schedules?
NEWS
August 9, 2013
YOU MIGHT not call him a brainiac, but Dr. Neal Barnard is certainly brainy. He takes care of his gray matter and wants you to take care of yours. He'll be at the Ethical Society Friday night to talk about it. Power Foods for the Brain (Hachette) is Barnard's latest book, and his thinking on food and health is worth paying attention to. Not just because he's a best-selling author, does nutrition research, teaches medicine at George Washington University School of Medicine and runs the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, all of which take mental acuity.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The jury is still out on whether consumers pay attention to calorie counts posted on fast-food menus, but some early evidence suggests that the restaurants do - or at least want patrons to think that they do. With nutrition labels on chain menus set to go nationwide by the end of the year, the effectiveness of an approach that aims to reduce obesity simply by increasing awareness is of keen interest to scientists. The results of a new pilot study, among the first to examine how fast-food chains have responded nationally, are intriguing but mixed.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Andrew Kitchenman, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey officials have begun a small experiment they hope will reap big rewards as they seek ways to improve residents' dietary and exercise habits. And they're using an unusual channel to accomplish this: faith-based organizations. The grant program Faithful Families Eating Smart and Moving More is providing funding to several faith-based nonprofits, enabling them to offer nutrition classes and exercise programs. The Hoboken-based Jubilee Center, a nonprofit associated with All Saints Episcopal Parish, has launched a nutrition and cooking class that is to last through August and aims to help 100 families improve their eating habits.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2013 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
NEW YORK - McDonald's once again faced criticism at its annual shareholder meeting Thursday that it is a purveyor of junk food that markets to children. The world's biggest hamburger chain has been looking to keep up with changing tastes as people increasingly opt for foods they feel are fresh or healthy. Customers can now order egg whites in its breakfast sandwiches, for example. McDonald's also recently introduced chicken wraps to go after people in their 20s and 30s looking for better-for-you options.
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