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Nuts

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NEWS
August 1, 2002
BY CALLING the patients at Trenton state psychiatric facility "nuts," the editor at the Trentonian relegated those people as something less than human, as something that fell out of trees. I am appalled by his use of the term "nuts," and I cannot help but think of other times in history when similar words were used to produce more devastating effects on people who were not considered human. I ask the editor of the Trentonian who wrote the story to continue to review his position about the fire at Trenton State Psychiatric, relegating patients to nuts and think hard how his statement distorted the perception of hundreds of people who only wished to be accepted in a multi-faceted world, filled with both good and evil at a time when compassion is the benchmark of human endeavor.
NEWS
November 20, 2006
LINDA Diggs-Turner wrote that she wants to bring back the draft. I bet she doesn't have a son near draft age. Well, I do! The war in Iraq has nothing to do with what happened on 9/11. I won't let anyone take my son to war just because George Bush had a grudge against Saddam! And I'm a lifelong Republican. Robert Patrick McNulty Philadelphia
FOOD
December 7, 1988 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Of course you can't stop eating them - that's why nuts belong in a safe, or at least a safe place! The safest place to keep them? In the freezer. Not even the nuttiest nut-ophiles are likely to risk their dental work on frozen nuts. The freezer keeps the fresh flavor of nuts safe, too. It's the ideal place to keep rarely used, oil-rich ingredients. Once opened, a package of nuts will turn rancid and bitter if left at room temperature for a long period of time. Which brings us to the next question: What's a Slim Gourmet cook doing with nuts in the first place?
FOOD
October 28, 1987 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. What nuts contain caffeine? Joyce Williams Laureldale, Pa. A. The nuts that we are most familiar with in North America, such as peanuts, walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, etc., contain no caffeine. Although there are more than 63 species of plants growing in all parts of the world which contain caffeine in their leaves, seeds or fruit, most of us have only come in contact with three of them - cacao beans, coffee beans and tea leaves. One nut that is popular in certain parts of the world, particularly Africa, is the kola nut, which is chewed because of its stimulating properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
On its surface, Nuts is a supercharged courtroom drama about a Park Avenue prostitute and her fight to be declared mentally competent after she has killed a jet-set john. Probe deeper, which Martin Ritt's stunning achievement does, and it's an excavation of the buried traumas of an American family - an excavation by dynamite, courtesy of explosive performances by Barbra Streisand as the hooker and Richard Dreyfuss as her legal-aid lawyer. They hit you smack in the solar plexus.
FOOD
February 5, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nutrition issues are rarely black or white. In fact, it's the gray areas that tend to make us all scratch our heads. People constantly ask, "Is this a good food?" or "Should I eat this food?" expecting a simple yes or no. Sorry, folks, it's just not that easy. It is challenging, though. Take nuts and seeds, for instance. Nuts and seeds are great sources of protein. And they can be helpful in creating high-quality protein when combined with grains and legumes. But they contain far more fat than protein, which puts them in the "use sparingly" category.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
Reading the Aug. 3 Family/Home/Fashion section article "Sweating out summer in a business suit," I was struck by a paradox: To wear such a costume in the heat is to behave in a manner inconsistent with the attributes one expects a competent business person to possess. A good manager should display practicality, common sense and sound judgment, right? Looking at it logically, it would seem that any man who would choose to wear a jacket, tie and long-sleeve shirt when it's 92 degrees in the shade with humidity to match belongs in Byberry, not the boardroom.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
"I did it," Slats Grobnik said triumphantly. "I got through the whole thing without knowing what's going on. " You got through what thing? "This creep Jeffrey Dahmer in Milwaukee. The trial's over now. He's going to prison. He's going to disappear from the newspapers and the TV, and I got through it all without reading one word about him. " Not even one word? "Only the headlines. I had to look at the headlines so I'd know what I wasn't going to read. And when I watched the news, I sat there with the zapper in my hand.
FOOD
October 22, 2009 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
For a while now, I've suspected a trend when friends of a certain age pulled bags of almonds from their purses to eat for lunch or snacks. But I really knew something was up with the nut when, this past summer, I saw teenagers munching almonds before competing in swim meets. My daughter informed me word had spread on the team that almonds are a far better source of energy for athletes than salt- or sugar-loaded snacks, including those billed as "energy bars. " You know something's hot when a teenager eats it instead of potato chips or chocolate.
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Washington, D.C., this election year, the nuts are proliferating. "It seems to be a very good acorn year," said Frank Santamour, research geneticist at the National Arboretum. "I think it's going to be a happy year for squirrels. " That will surely be the case in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey as well. Nuts are positively raining down from beech, hickory, oak and walnut trees. "We have a good nut supply," this year, said Bob Gutowski, manager of the Center for Urban Forestry at Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 1, 2014
IN THESE DAYS of growing income inequality, the rich get richer and the poor get . . . diabetes. And heart disease. And cancer. A recent study of the eating habits of 29,124 Americans by the Harvard School of Public Health verified a widening "food gap" between the poor and everyone else. While people at higher income levels are eating more healthy foods than they were 12 years ago, low-income Americans are lagging even farther behind. Poor eating habits, and the obesity that often results, are strongly tied to a host of chronic (and expensive to treat)
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | BY JEFF CROUERE
D efinition of insanity: Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. - Albert Einstein Unbelievably, the drumbeat has begun for former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney to run for president a third time. The man who lost twice for president is now being encouraged by many party leaders to give it another try. Congressman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, recently told MSNBC: "I think he's proven right on a lot of stuff. I happen to be in the camp that thinks he's actually going to run and I think he will be the next president of the United States.
FOOD
March 14, 2014 | MICHAEL KLEIN, Philly.com
Federal Donuts - the specialist in fried chicken, doughnuts and coffee - has opened its third location, in a brownstone at 3428 Sansom St. (267-275-8489) next to Doc Magrogan's and across from Penn Law School in University City. The location is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. or sellout; chicken starts at 11 a.m. Despite the steps leading to the door, this location is built for speed with a counter and a fair amount of table seating. Chef Matthew Fein has devised new flavors of doughnuts and chicken, and the menu changes.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOE Mastropaolo wouldn't let a little thing like turning 100 keep him from the pool tables or the dance floor. He might not have been Minnesota Fats, but he could run a table with the precision of a much younger man, and proved it frequently after turning the century mark on Jan. 6, 2013. As for dancing, he might not have been Fred Astaire but he could cut a rug, as they used to say, with the best of them, and always made it a point to dance with every lady in the house. "He didn't want anybody to feel left out," said his daughter, Rita Ferrara.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Watching your weight? Hoping for better heart health? Trying to prevent type 2 diabetes? Nuts to all that! It turns out that nuts appear to bestow a wide variety of health benefits, from helping clear out bad cholesterol to cutting down on visceral fat to reducing the risk of dying from heart disease or cancer. The benefits of consuming nuts were emphasized late last year in a large study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Findings revealed that participants in the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who ate a fistful of nuts daily were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than those who did not consume nuts.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For longtime pediatrician John Tedeschi, the future of medicine relies less on the whiz-bang advances of scientific researchers and more on the nuts and bolts of delivering medical care. "The academicians can't solve the operational problems," said Tedeschi, 75, who founded Advocare L.L.C., one of the largest primary-care providers in the region, and Continuum Health Alliance L.L.C., which manages doctors' practices. The push to ensure patients get the care when they need it, in the best, yet least-expensive setting, has been the heart of government interventions to lower health-care costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* BROADCHURCH. 10 p.m. Wednesdays, BBC America.   BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Olivia Colman's had a taste of sudden fame, and it's cost her in cab fare. When "Broadchurch" aired on Britain's ITV last spring, fans "went completely nuts," said the actress of the public reaction to the murder mystery that launched last week on BBC America (and which Fox has announced plans to remake with series creator Chris Chibnall on board). Before this, "I've only done stuff which is slightly under the radar or maybe a bit too artsy for a lot of people's tastes," said Colman in an interview here last month, playing down a resumé that includes the Olympics-themed mockumentary "Twenty Twelve," for which she won one of her two BAFTAs (Britain's equivalent of the Oscars and Emmys)
NEWS
April 26, 2013
WHY DO bars serve nuts? I'd always assumed it was to make you thirsty so you'd drink more beer. But that's only half right, as the taste and smell experts from University City's Monell Chemical Senses Center proved to me on a recent afternoon of sudsy experimentation. The center's researchers were gearing up for the Philadelphia Science Festival, the citywide nerd expo that runs through Sunday. Beer drinkers in particular will want to dip into Monell's fun presentation tomorrow at Yards Brewery, where they'll explain the chemistry behind beer-and-food pairings.
FOOD
April 25, 2013 | Craig LaBan
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of April 23, 2013: Craig LaBan: There's a new cafe in the sunny, modern space at the corner of 12th and Spruce: Toast. It's the house-made English muffins, pictured here, that are the draw. These were almost too good - so perfect they looked just like very good versions of store-bought muffins, but more tender, with toothsome, butter-soaked crannies. Also, I've been enjoying some recent visits to Citizens Bank Park.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I decided to take some classes at a local community college. We both have college degrees, but there was a class we were interested in. We are the oldest students in the class by 10 to 20 years. I am irritated by our classmates' disrespect for the instructor. It takes the form of talking with each other when the instructor is speaking, then asking her to explain what she just discussed while they were talking. They sometimes get so loud that I can't hear what the teacher is saying.
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