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NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration on Wednesday announced a detailed, multifaceted plan to sell or find new uses for 31 of the School District of Philadelphia's closed school buildings. The mayor promised a "more streamlined, flexible, and predictable" process that includes a comprehensive assessment of each site. The city and the district also said they would create a website and host public meetings on the overall plan and the fate of specific locations. But the announcement, in the form of a news release, neglected to mention one thing: that Nutter and City Council remain locked in an epic face-off over how to handle the mothballed schools.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | By Fredric N. Tulsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann J. Land, 58, was locked in a close race early today with investment broker Michael A. Nutter, 33, in her effort to retain the Fourth District Council seat she has held since 1981. The results in the race were straggling in, and showed the race neck-and- neck early this morning with about 40 percent of the votes counted. But Nutter said shortly after 1:30 a.m. today that Land's campaign manager had called him and conceded the outcome. Four years ago, Land had retained her seat by holding off a challenge by Nutter.
NEWS
April 17, 2007 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Michael Nutter's mayoral campaign doesn't work out, maybe he has a future in retail. Buried in the former councilman's detailed budget policy paper - which will be formally released today - is an interesting notion: a "Philly Gear" apparel line, to be sold online and at city-operated gift stores. Modeled on Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's ambitious New York City Store, Nutter's plan predicts that Philly-branded products could earn the cash-strapped city up to $1 million in annual revenue.
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | By Patrick Kerkstra and Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Mayor Nutter took office in January, the expectations for his administration could not have been higher. Ten months and a $1 billion budget crisis later, should Philadelphians temper their hopes? Yes and no, Nutter said in a Friday interview. "I think yesterday was part of the expectation-adjustment process," Nutter said, referring to his Thursday announcement of painful spending cuts and a freeze on planned tax reductions. But Nutter did not back off his most ambitious goals, such as halving the high school dropout rate within seven years, and doubling the city's four-year college-degree attainment rate within 10 years.
NEWS
March 24, 2004 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though he's still working on last-minute Council business and has yet to pack his bags, City Councilman Michael A. Nutter is leaving for Cape Town in South Africa tomorrow for a fellowship program on leadership and public-service values. Called the Emerging Leaders Program, the fellowship is administered by the United States/Southern Africa Center for Leadership and Public Values, a partnership between Duke University and the University of Cape Town. Nutter said yesterday he was nominated as a fellow in the fall by a friend who had completed the program.
NEWS
April 17, 2006 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Union leader John J. Dougherty has an ultimatum for City Councilman Michael A. Nutter, a potential rival in the race for mayor of Philadelphia: Resign, or take yourself out of next year's Democratic primary. According to Dougherty, Nutter effectively declared himself a mayoral candidate last week by filing a lawsuit demanding that four other potential candidates return money raised in violation of the city's new campaign-contribution limits. Under the City Charter, officeholders explicitly running for a job other than the one they have must resign their current post.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, Daily News Staff Writer
WOULD Mayor Nutter like to trade in his office at City Hall for one at the White House? Political circles have been buzzing for months with speculation that Nutter might cut short his second term for a job in Washington if President Obama is re-elected. And Nutter's speaking appearance at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night will only fan those flames. Just how seriously should this chatter be taken? Insiders say that if Nutter wants a job, he would likely be a strong contender.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MAYOR NUTTER yesterday shifted oversight for the Department of Licenses and Inspections to the deputy mayor for public safety on the recommendation of a task force created to examine L&I in the aftermath of last year's Market Street building collapse. Nutter also created a new position of chief safety officer who will report to Deputy Mayor for Public Safety Everett Gillison, and enforce L&I's safety standards and regulations for construction and demolition of city buildings. However, he did not act on a task-force recommendation that L&I be split, saying that he needed more time to consider the implications of the proposal.
NEWS
April 17, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Mayor Nutter, opponent T. Milton Street Sr. may be an itch that won't go away - but he is still by any measure the very distant second in next month's Democratic primary for mayor. That has freed Nutter to concentrate on how to make the most of a second term, and at the moment that means getting some allies elected to City Council, where for three-plus years he has lacked a reliable majority of votes. An official "Nutter slate" of candidates may not coalesce, but the mayor does intend to actively back Council aspirants in some competitive races for open seats.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city's on-again, off-again romance with banning smoking in all workplaces is, for the moment, showing signs of working out. Though time is running out for City Council to vote on the measure before it breaks for the summer, one roadblock has been cleared: Mayor Street is at least on speaking terms with Councilman Michael A. Nutter, the sponsor of the bill. Last Thursday, the mayor had complained that Nutter, who appeared one vote shy of getting the bill passed, was trying to ram the legislation through Council no matter what the cost.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter on Friday named a diverse group of 24 people to oversee the implementation of the 91 recommendations made last month in a U.S. Department of Justice report that found that Philadelphia police used lethal force too often. The newly created Police Community Oversight Board will also work on implementing the broader recommendations made in President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing report, which made similar suggestions. Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey chaired the task force.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The entrance to what's promised to be Philadelphia's hottest music club come fall is a gravel lot under an I-95 overpass. Now, it's just an abandoned metal factory in Fishtown - windows long blown out, covered in graffiti. But by fall, developers promise, it will be home to the Fillmore, a 2,500-seat music hall that promoter Live Nation aims to fill with big-name talent, as well as the Foundry, a more intimate venue with room for 450 aimed at local bands and up-and-coming talent, and a lounge.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER is scheduled to meet behind closed doors today with U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson to discuss preparations for the upcoming papal visit to the city, the mayor's spokesman said yesterday. Nutter and Johnson may also discuss security details related to the next Democratic National Convention that is scheduled to take place here in 2016 after the mayor leaves office, and the city's policy regarding U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainer requests, spokesman Mark McDonald said.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
You likely know lots of reasons why it's wise to avoid mixing business with pleasure, but here's a simple one: It's tough to smile warmly at friends while holding out coolly for your own interests. So credit Mayor Nutter for the public stance he took last week with Comcast, Philadelphia's First Corporate Citizen - a company whose history, fortune, and personalities sometimes seem woven into the city's very fabric. I was among the skeptics who worried when Nutter seemed to be sitting on an embarrassing survey of 800 randomly selected Comcast customers and nonsubscribers, done in 2013 to help prepare city officials for franchise-renewal negotiations.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter has allowed controversial 3-D animated billboards to come to Center City, after negotiating for modifications to how the displays will be regulated. The five-story installations, dubbed "urban experiential displays" (UEDs), are limited to a portion of Center City. One is to be built outside the Convention Center, another outside the Reading Terminal Market, pending approval from the Art Commission. Councilman Mark Squilla introduced the legislation, which met with resistance from the Center City Residents Association and Scenic Philadelphia, a group advocating for green spaces.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a quarter of Comcast cable subscribers in Philadelphia are dissatisfied with their service, according to a long-awaited report released by the city as it prepares to negotiate a multiyear franchise agreement with the telecommunications giant. Mayor Nutter said the city will press Comcast Corp. to improve those numbers, and will seek a dramatic increase in broadband access across the city. Specifically, he called for Comcast to provide free broadband in underserved neighborhoods and high-speed broadband capacity at libraries and other key locations.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas and Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia City Council President Darrell L. Clarke launched his first official strike against Mayor Nutter's proposed 9.3 percent property tax increase by introducing his own plan for a new school-funding stream. Clarke introduced a bill Thursday that would authorize the city to sell liens on commercial properties and use the revenue for schools. The Council president was vague in how much money his proposal was expected to bring. A news release sent by his staff said that "millions of dollars in new revenue from selling commercial liens could be sent to the School District of Philadelphia annually.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter took shots Thursday at the people hoping to become his successor, suggesting the candidates' plans to fund the Philadelphia School District were "bogus. " "You cannot run around this school, shake hands with students, take pictures, read to second graders, talk to middle schoolers, inspire high school students, and then when you're back at your office comfortably not put forward the money that they need to educate their students," Nutter said at an event at Kensington Health Sciences Academy with Gov. Wolf.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
MAYOR NUTTER yesterday allowed a controversial bill to bring nearly six-story, 3-D digital advertising as large as 3,500 square feet to Center City to become law without his signature. But he returned the bills to City Council asking that the law be significantly changed. "I understand the concerns of those who have objected to UEDs [Urban Experiential Displays], but also recognize that in certain locations, well-designed displays, compatible with their surroundings, may in fact add to the landscape," Nutter said in a letter to Council President Darrell Clarke and other Council members.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  On Tuesday, Philadelphia City Council will begin listening to weeks of testimony from administration officials and department heads on the mayor's proposed $4 billion budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. It is Mayor Nutter's eighth and final budget, and here's a heads-up for any homeowners who missed the announcement: It contains the T-word. The most controversial issue in the budget process is bound to be Nutter's proposed 9.34-percent property tax increase, which is expected to pump $105 million in new money to the struggling school district.
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