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NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration on Wednesday announced a detailed, multifaceted plan to sell or find new uses for 31 of the School District of Philadelphia's closed school buildings. The mayor promised a "more streamlined, flexible, and predictable" process that includes a comprehensive assessment of each site. The city and the district also said they would create a website and host public meetings on the overall plan and the fate of specific locations. But the announcement, in the form of a news release, neglected to mention one thing: that Nutter and City Council remain locked in an epic face-off over how to handle the mothballed schools.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | By Fredric N. Tulsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann J. Land, 58, was locked in a close race early today with investment broker Michael A. Nutter, 33, in her effort to retain the Fourth District Council seat she has held since 1981. The results in the race were straggling in, and showed the race neck-and- neck early this morning with about 40 percent of the votes counted. But Nutter said shortly after 1:30 a.m. today that Land's campaign manager had called him and conceded the outcome. Four years ago, Land had retained her seat by holding off a challenge by Nutter.
NEWS
April 17, 2007 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Michael Nutter's mayoral campaign doesn't work out, maybe he has a future in retail. Buried in the former councilman's detailed budget policy paper - which will be formally released today - is an interesting notion: a "Philly Gear" apparel line, to be sold online and at city-operated gift stores. Modeled on Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's ambitious New York City Store, Nutter's plan predicts that Philly-branded products could earn the cash-strapped city up to $1 million in annual revenue.
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | By Patrick Kerkstra and Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Mayor Nutter took office in January, the expectations for his administration could not have been higher. Ten months and a $1 billion budget crisis later, should Philadelphians temper their hopes? Yes and no, Nutter said in a Friday interview. "I think yesterday was part of the expectation-adjustment process," Nutter said, referring to his Thursday announcement of painful spending cuts and a freeze on planned tax reductions. But Nutter did not back off his most ambitious goals, such as halving the high school dropout rate within seven years, and doubling the city's four-year college-degree attainment rate within 10 years.
NEWS
March 24, 2004 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though he's still working on last-minute Council business and has yet to pack his bags, City Councilman Michael A. Nutter is leaving for Cape Town in South Africa tomorrow for a fellowship program on leadership and public-service values. Called the Emerging Leaders Program, the fellowship is administered by the United States/Southern Africa Center for Leadership and Public Values, a partnership between Duke University and the University of Cape Town. Nutter said yesterday he was nominated as a fellow in the fall by a friend who had completed the program.
NEWS
April 17, 2006 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Union leader John J. Dougherty has an ultimatum for City Councilman Michael A. Nutter, a potential rival in the race for mayor of Philadelphia: Resign, or take yourself out of next year's Democratic primary. According to Dougherty, Nutter effectively declared himself a mayoral candidate last week by filing a lawsuit demanding that four other potential candidates return money raised in violation of the city's new campaign-contribution limits. Under the City Charter, officeholders explicitly running for a job other than the one they have must resign their current post.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, Daily News Staff Writer
WOULD Mayor Nutter like to trade in his office at City Hall for one at the White House? Political circles have been buzzing for months with speculation that Nutter might cut short his second term for a job in Washington if President Obama is re-elected. And Nutter's speaking appearance at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night will only fan those flames. Just how seriously should this chatter be taken? Insiders say that if Nutter wants a job, he would likely be a strong contender.
NEWS
April 17, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Mayor Nutter, opponent T. Milton Street Sr. may be an itch that won't go away - but he is still by any measure the very distant second in next month's Democratic primary for mayor. That has freed Nutter to concentrate on how to make the most of a second term, and at the moment that means getting some allies elected to City Council, where for three-plus years he has lacked a reliable majority of votes. An official "Nutter slate" of candidates may not coalesce, but the mayor does intend to actively back Council aspirants in some competitive races for open seats.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city's on-again, off-again romance with banning smoking in all workplaces is, for the moment, showing signs of working out. Though time is running out for City Council to vote on the measure before it breaks for the summer, one roadblock has been cleared: Mayor Street is at least on speaking terms with Councilman Michael A. Nutter, the sponsor of the bill. Last Thursday, the mayor had complained that Nutter, who appeared one vote shy of getting the bill passed, was trying to ram the legislation through Council no matter what the cost.
NEWS
January 27, 2011
With Mayor Nutter about to face city voters again, he's making a smart political move - as well as one that's in the interests of good government - by expanding the rules for most city workers on accepting gifts, safeguards on sexual harassment limits on outside employment, and by imposing a needed ban on nepotism. Nutter's 2007 election campaign on a reform platform included a memorable "throw out the bums" TV ad showing the top of City Hall being ripped off. So the ethics rules the mayor issued as executive orders Tuesday were a welcome reminder of why Philadelphians rallied behind him. The mayor, of course, would argue that he's kept his reform fervor well-stoked all along.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following the 2013 Center City building collapse that killed six people and injured 13, committees tasked by City Council and the Nutter administration to look into how to reform the Department of Licenses and Inspections concluded that the regulatory agency was underfunded. The department is budgeted at $28.8 million and 353 positions, 20 of which are unfilled. On Thursday, Mayor Nutter responded by calling for an extra $10.8 million for L&I, spread over three years. The first $5.5 million, to be allocated in 2016, would go toward hiring 43 employees, most of them building inspectors, and for new technology.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Who says Mayor Nutter won't be a player in this year's election to choose his successor? By proposing a 9.34 percent property-tax hike in his final budget, Nutter has given Philadelphians a barometer to judge which mayoral candidate they agree with on taxing and spending. In fact, with a number of City Council members all but declaring Nutter's tax increase dead on arrival, voters can also use the idea to gauge which Council candidates would be better fiscal stewards. Let the discussion begin.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
In his final budget proposal, Mayor Nutter said, he wanted to try something new to support the city's ailing schools - actually giving the district what it asked for. To meet the request for an additional $103 million, Nutter on Thursday proposed a 9.3 percent property-tax increase, calling it a sustainable funding source to usher in a new era for a district damaged by years of short-term fixes. Nutter's tax increase would raise $105 million, all of which would go to the district. "Now, more than ever, investing in education, in our city's future, is the right thing to do," Nutter said in his budget address to City Council.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
ANOTHER storm is brewing, and we're not talking snow. We're talking about a fresh round of Mayor Nutter vs. City Council. Nutter is expected to unveil a budget today that will call for a more than 9 percent increase in property taxes to help infuse the Philadelphia School District with desperately needed money, according to sources. The mayor's proposed property-tax hike of 9.34 percent is likely to put City Council - which must approve Nutter's eighth and final budget - in a difficult position at a time when all 17 council members are up for re-election.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas and Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writers
Mayor Nutter will ask City Council on Thursday to approve a 9.3 percent increase in property taxes to fund the beleaguered School District. In his final budget address as mayor, Nutter will ask Council - in an election year - to approve a $3.95 billion spending plan that would raise property owners' taxes by hundreds or even thousands of dollars a year. Currently, the tax bill for a home assessed at the median of $113,000 is $1,112. If Nutter's proposal was approved, it would go up to $1,216.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
MAYOR NUTTER eased into the property-tax-hike bombshell: He thanked political mentors who believed in "a wide-eyed kid from West Philly. " He asked for a moment of silence for "exemplary public servants" who died in the past year. He talked of good times and tough choices. He buttered up all 16 Council members, giving individual shout-outs for legislative accomplishments. "I'd like to take a few moments to thank all of you for what you have done to keep us moving in the right direction," Nutter said near the start of his 45-minute budget address before City Council yesterday.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
MAYOR NUTTER yesterday unveiled his eighth and final budget proposal, for fiscal year 2016, which begins July 1. It must be approved by City Council. Here are the highlights: * $3.95 billion in spending - an increase of 2.3 percent, or nearly $90 million. Nutter attributed the increase to nearly $51 million in rising city pension and health-care costs and a $27.4 million contract arbitration award for the Police Department. *  A projected $3.85 billion in revenues, an increase of $67 million.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years after agreeing to submit to federal court monitoring of its controversial stop-and-frisk program, the Philadelphia Police Department has made little progress toward curbing unwarranted stops that disproportionately target minorities, according to an analysis filed Tuesday by a group of civil rights lawyers. The report found that 37 percent of the more than 200,000 pedestrian stops made by police in 2014 were done without reasonable suspicion of criminal activity - down from 47 percent from in 2012.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter said Thursday that his successor must understand the importance of preventing youth violence if Philadelphia is to thrive. "You know what year it is," he told a room crowded with educators, politicians, and youth outreach groups on Temple University's campus. "I will go. But the work, the effort, and the impact, must continue. Whoever comes next must understand how critically important, how critically vital, how impactful this work is. " The city has made some important progress, he noted: homicides are down, employment is up, and development is booming.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com 215-854-4890
YOUTH VIOLENCE is a disease and it spreads like a virus, Mayor Nutter told about 75 people at a Temple University conference yesterday. Attendees included activists, educators and members of the mayor's Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative. "Violence is a public-health crisis," Nutter said. "It is a disease. We know how to treat disease. " Nutter cited a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to the city and Temple to set up Ceasefire Philly, an offshoot of a Chicago-based group that uses methods and strategies similar to disease control to stop violence in communities.
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