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NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writers
Mayor Nutter took the lectern for a final news conference Thursday, and in a tone that was kind of sad, kind of tired, got the business out of the way first. Dressed down a little bit, without a tie, he encouraged people - for the eighth year in a row - to come out for the Mummers Parade and reminded them to stay safe. Then, in the ornate Mayor's Reception Room, where portraits of the city's former leaders hang, questions shifted to his legacy and how the job changed him. "I've become just much more personally emotional during the course of the last eight years," he said at the end of the news conference.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter is not one to complain about his job. It is a gig he has loved, maybe never more so than in his last year, which he took on with a mix of nostalgia and joy, rarely focusing, at least publicly, on the end. But on a recent afternoon in his office, still cluttered with papers and not a moving box in sight, Nutter conceded that being "up" for the better part of eight years has been taxing. "Not just awake. Up," he said. "The moment I step out of that car in the morning, I know that people are looking.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
On his first full day as mayor, Michael Nutter flung open City Hall's doors to thousands of Philadelphians who waited hours to shake the hand of someone they believed could become one of the city's finest mayors. By many measures, Nutter did not disappoint. After eight years of his leadership, the city has its lowest homicide rate since 1967, its highest credit rating ever from Standard & Poor's, and the rewards of a well-run government. It was frustrating to see Nutter too often choose taxation to stave off the impact of the 2008 recession, but his strategy kept the city on its feet and allowed it to hit its stride, as Center City's energy and prosperity began spilling into nearby neighborhoods.
NEWS
December 24, 2015
SANTA MAYOR NUTTER on Tuesday, without a hearty ho-ho-ho, gave an early Christmas present to law-abiding Philadelphians, who must have been nice this year. Unhappily, the gift seemed like a lump of coal to those dedicated to protecting illegal immigrants, including those foreigners who have been convicted of a crime. The mayor reversed his 2014 executive order that had curtailed cooperation with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, a federal agency under the Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter on Tuesday changed the rules about what information the city shares with the federal government about some immigrants, a policy shift that will last less than two weeks. Mayor-elect Jim Kenney has vowed to roll back the change, which has been under discussion for six weeks, after he is sworn into office on Jan. 4. A Kenney spokesman on Tuesday confirmed that he still plans to do that. Nutter altered his 2014 executive order, which barred the city's Police Department and prison system from complying with federal requests to detain undocumented immigrants who otherwise would be released pending trial or after having served sentences.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter on Thursday touted the achievements of the city's inspector general, whose office has saved or recovered more than $70 million during his time in office. The city has saved or recovered more than $12 million this year, according to a report highlighting eight years of work by the Office of the Inspector General, which is responsible for rooting out government corruption and waste. "Philadelphia is a more ethical, transparent, and accountable city than it ever has been - a major milestone for a government once considered to be hopelessly corrupt," Amy L. Kurland, who was appointed inspector general by Nutter in 2008, wrote in the report.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter on Tuesday signed off on an expansion of a Philadelphia law that outlines when employers can ask potential hires about their criminal backgrounds. He also strengthened the city's rules on hiring former offenders. Under the updated "ban-the-box" law, employers are not be permitted to complete a background check until they have made a conditional job offer, as opposed to after the first interview. The term comes from a box on application forms asking about a criminal record.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER, with less than four weeks left in office, returned to City Council yesterday - where he once served - to give a heartfelt farewell speech that lacked any curse words. He lauded Council for some of its accomplishments since he took office in January 2008. Nutter noted the legislative body's approval of $400 million in re-occurring funding for schools, raising the minimum wage for subcontractors, passing a sick-leave bill and helping to reduce crime by approving various measures in support of the Police Department and ex-convicts.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
The war of words between Mayor Nutter and Donald Trump continued Wednesday, with Trump calling Nutter a "low life," and the mayor describing the Republican presidential candidate as "a cartoon character. " The animosity between the two first flared Tuesday when the mayor, at a news conference, used the word a-hole to describe Trump, who has drawn fire this week for his call to ban Muslims from entering the country. A peeved Trump took to Twitter Wednesday to say Nutter was doing a terrible job and "should be ashamed for using such a disgusting word in referring to me. Low life!"
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shoulder to shoulder they stood: imams in kufis, ministers in robes, rabbis in skullcaps, elected officials and community leaders in business suits. Against that backdrop at City Hall on Tuesday, Mayor Nutter condemned the "ignorant act" of the person who left a severed pig's head outside the Al Aqsa Islamic Society mosque and school in North Philadelphia. The head was found Monday morning. Dropping part of a pig at a mosque has a special significance because pigs are anathema to Muslims who observe halal dietary laws.
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