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NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN & JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writers deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
A NEWS conference at which African-American leaders had planned to release a report alleging racial discrimination by a company that won state approval to open a casino in South Philadelphia went bust yesterday after the mayor pulled the plug on it, sources told the Daily News . The news conference had been called by Philadelphia NAACP president Rodney Muhammad to slam Baltimore-based Cordish Companies, but it didn't materialize on City Hall's...
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration on Tuesday laid out an ambitious vision for assuring that all children in Philadelphia benefit from high-quality early learning experiences. Labeled "A Running Start Philadelphia: For Every Child, Birth to Five," the outline offers guidance on how the city can guarantee the best learning opportunities for its youngest citizens as a way to offset the long-term, systemic poverty in some neighborhoods. "With this plan, Philadelphia has developed a strategy to support its children and families by building stronger schools to create a more competitive workforce," Nutter said.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of Mayor Nutter's sharpest former critics on City Council met privately Thursday with the lame-duck mayor he'd once trashed and bashed, and both men came out smiling. The erstwhile Nutter critic - who not so long ago was tweeting about "Mayor Nutty!" - was the man most likely to succeed him, James F. Kenney. Fresh off his landslide victory in Tuesday's Democratic mayoral primary, Kenney stood with Nutter outside the mayor's second-floor City Hall office and praised his tenure.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A top Nutter administration official Thursday made his best pitch to City Council: The mayor's proposed property-tax increase is the clearest way to get city schools the $105 million they desperately need. "Without additional funding, the schools will have another bleak year," Finance Director Rob Dubow said at a Council hearing. Mayor Nutter wants a 9.3 percent jump in the city's property-tax rate to generate $105 million for the beleaguered Philadelphia School District, but skeptical Council members have said that's going to be a tough sell.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | Jennifer Wright, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER schoolmates Mayor Nutter and Democratic mayoral primary winner Jim Kenney have at least one more thing in common, they agreed: Each was a "pain in the ass" while on City Council. Things were chummy all around yesterday as the two St. Joseph's Prep School alums complimented one another, at times bashfully, during a news conference at City Hall. Nutter answered with a resolute "no" to whether he's bothered by Kenney as the Democratic nominee, despite some of the former councilman's disagreements with his policies.
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
  If you haven't decided how you're getting to the polls Nov. 3 - and chances are you haven't - consider this option: a ride from Mayor Nutter. That's one prize up for grabs in a video contest and voter-turnout campaign launching Friday. The others aren't too bad, either, including a cooking class with Jose Garces and a gym workout alongside former Gov. Ed Rendell. To enter, voters can create a video 15 seconds or shorter describing why they vote, and share it on social media using the hashtag #ivotephilly.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter on Wednesday waded deep into the Democratic primary for mayor, suggesting that State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams was "probably not smart enough" for the city's top elected job if he wants to fire Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey. Nutter dropped that political bomb after Williams, during Tuesday's final televised debate before the May 19 primary, said Ramsey should be out of a job for overseeing his department's stop-and-frisk policy. "Anyone who is not smart enough to ask him to stay is probably not smart enough to lead the city," Nutter said at a memorial for fallen police officers and firefighters.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | William Bender and Stephanie Far, Daily News Staff Writers
MAYOR NUTTER hasn't publicly endorsed anyone to succeed him in the six-way Democratic primary. But he made it abundantly clear yesterday who he's not endorsing. Speaking at the Living Flame Memorial Service to honor deceased firefighters and police officers, Nutter said state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams essentially lacks the mental acuity to serve as mayor. Nutter, who is wrapping up his second term, defended police Commissioner Charles Ramsey after Williams said, at Tuesdays' 6ABC debate, that he would fire Ramsey if elected mayor.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
MAYOR NUTTER kicked off a series of school visits yesterday at Roxborough High to tout his plan for more school funding. Nutter's proposed 9.3 percent property-tax hike would raise $105 million in new recurring money for the cash-strapped district. The funding, in conjunction with additional dollars proposed by Gov. Wolf, would close the district's $85 million shortfall and allow schools to restore support staff and expand innovative programs, the mayor said. "What we're talking about is now investments, eliminating a longstanding deficit and then investing in schools like Roxborough High and many, many others," Nutter said during a sit-down with administrators and parents.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A new organization backed by President Obama has turned to Mayor Nutter and Sen. Cory A. Booker (D., N.J.) for support as it aims to help young minority men thrive, and perhaps shape the president's legacy after he leaves office. Booker and Nutter are among a star-studded list of board members or advisers to My Brother's Keeper Alliance, which has spun off from an Obama initiative and figures to play a major role in the president's plans after he leaves office. The group, Obama said, will work to close "opportunity gaps" that confront minority men born into poor communities, leaving them feeling that "no matter how hard they try, they may never achieve their dreams.
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