FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - New York City's Police Department is facing mounting criticism of its secret surveillance of Muslims across the Northeast, with ACLU chapters and other groups demanding an investigation and Gov. Christie accusing the NYPD of arrogantly acting as if "their jurisdiction is the world. " The intelligence-gathering was detailed recently in a series of Associated Press stories that reported that police monitored mosques and Muslims around the metropolitan area and kept tabs on Muslim student groups at the University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers, and other schools in Upstate New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - New York's mayor served notice Friday that his police department would do everything in its power to root out terrorists in the United States, even if that means sending officers outside the city limits or placing law-abiding Muslims under scrutiny. "We just cannot let our guard down again," Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned. He laid out his doctrine for keeping the city safe during his weekly radio show after a week of criticism of a secret New York Police Department effort to monitor mosques in several cities and keep files on Muslim student groups at colleges in Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Upstate New York.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Eileen Sullivan, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A Muslim civil rights group that has worked closely with the Obama administration to build better relationships with American Muslims is suing the New York Police Department over its surveillance programs. Eight Muslims filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday in New Jersey to force the NYPD to end its surveillance and other intelligence-gathering practices that have targeted Muslims since the 9/11 attacks. The lawsuit alleged that the NYPD's activities were unconstitutional because they focused on people's religion, national origin and race.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A New York Police Department detective told a federal judge that he has seen no evidence that one of his informants brought up the subject of jihad as a way to bait Muslims into making incriminating remarks. But text messages obtained by the Associated Press show otherwise. While the detective, Stephen Hoban, described the activities in a new legal filing in U.S. District Court as narrowly focused on a few people under investigation, text messages show a wide-ranging effort.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Adam Goldman and Matt Apuzzo, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York Police Department collected information on businesses owned by second- and third-generation Americans because they were Muslims, according to newly obtained secret documents. They show in the clearest terms yet that police were monitoring people based on religion, despite claims from Mayor Michael Bloomberg to the contrary. The NYPD has faced intense criticism from Muslims, lawmakers - even the FBI - for spying operations that put entire neighborhoods under surveillance.
NEWS
March 3, 2012 | By Samantha Gross and David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - An interstate feud escalated Friday when a New York congressman berated New Jersey Gov. Christie for "trying to score cheap political points" instead of saving lives when he complained that the New York Police Department's monitoring of Muslims across the state line was arrogant and secretive. Rep. Peter King, chairman of the Homeland Security Committee, said Christie crossed a line when he mocked Police Commissioner Ray Kelly as "all-knowing, all-seeing," and said the NYPD's intelligence operation in Newark may have been "born out of arrogance.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Tom Hays, Associated Press
NEW YORK - When revelers pack Times Square for the annual New Year's Eve celebration Monday night, police will observe a tradition of their own: giving them lots of company. Each year, the New York Police Department assigns thousands of extra patrols - in ways seen and unseen - to the festivities to control the crowd and watch for signs of trouble. Hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world are expected to pack into the midtown Manhattan streets to see the crystal ball drop and ring in 2013.
NEWS
May 19, 2011
NEW YORK - Jurors have ended their first day of deliberations without reaching a verdict in the rape trial of two New York City police officers. The jury was expected to start a second day of deliberations today. Officers Kenneth Moreno and Franklin Mata were called to help a drunken woman get home from a taxi in December 2008. Moreno is accused of raping her while she was physically helpless after passing out. Prosecutors said that Mata stood watch. Moreno said that the woman made sexual advances and that they cuddled in her bed but didn't have sex. In closing arguments Tuesday, prosecutor Coleen Balbert said that Moreno may not have believed that sex with the woman was rape but that it was because she was physically helpless.
NEWS
April 26, 2005 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who would have thought the chronicles of a flatfoot would be so gripping? Blue Blood, Edward Conlon's elegant and encyclopedic account of his experiences as a patrolman for the NYPD became a runaway best-seller last year. Joseph Wambaugh, a former policeman who has written prolifically about the sodality of the shield, explains the book's success. "This boy has big-time writing chops," he says, "a flair for dark humor, and he just loves being a street cop. In short, he reminds me of me - when life was fun. " Of course, Conlon, who will be at the Free Library tonight to promote the paperback release of Blue Blood, is no ordinary policeman.
NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Chris Hawley, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Thirty-three civil rights groups from around the country complained to the New York attorney general Friday about police documents that showed the New York Police Department recommending increased surveillance of Shiite mosques based solely on their religion. The letter urged Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to investigate the NYPD's surveillance operations, revealed by an Associated Press investigation, which monitored entire neighborhoods and built databases about everyday life in Muslim communities.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Charismatic. Intelligent. Quick with a joke. And, at heart, an Irish-born police officer who loved the city streets. Those were words spoken at a Funeral Mass on Tuesday morning to describe former Philadelphia Police Commissioner John F. Timoney, who died last week after a battle with lung cancer. Speaking to family, law enforcement brass, and hundreds of police officers inside St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan, where Timoney immigrated as a child, a star-studded list of mourners remembered the brash and outspoken law enforcement official as a "cop's cop" - thoughtful but tough, intellectual but also street-smart.
NEWS
February 22, 2016 | By Patricia Madej, Staff Writer
Several thousand Chinese Americans marched downtown Saturday to protest the conviction of New York police officer Peter Liang in the 2014 shooting death of an unarmed black man. The Philadelphia march was one of several around the country in support of Liang, events that one protester called a "milestone" for the ethnic community. In Brooklyn, a crowd estimated at 10,000 rallied in support of the officer. Liang, a 28-year-old Chinese American and a rookie officer, was convicted of second-degree manslaughter Feb. 11 for the 2014 death of Akai Gurley, who was shot by a ricocheting bullet as Liang entered a darkened stairwell.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal appeals court on Tuesday revived a lawsuit challenging the New York Police Department's post-9/11 surveillance of Muslim religious and civic groups, comparing the program to other dark moments of race-based government monitoring in America's past. "We have been down similar roads before," Circuit Judge Thomas Ambro wrote for a three-judge panel of the Philadelphia-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. "Jewish Americans during the Red Scare, African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, and Japanese Americans during World War II are examples that readily spring to mind.
NEWS
December 23, 2014
IF YOU SAY something loudly enough, with just the right amount of conviction, the odds are that people will begin to listen. They might not agree with you, but they'll listen, and then move on. Sometimes, though, there will be people who listen too closely and then, out of a skewed sense of reality or priorities, or simply as a convenient excuse for their own twisted motives, turn your passion and conviction into a criminal act. You will say...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terence Davies is quite possibly the greatest filmmaker you've never heard of. Celebrated pretty much only by cinephiles, the British writer-director, whose films include The Neon Bible , The House of Mirth , and Of Time and the City , has never attracted a mass audience. That will change, we hope, with the release of two of his films, the 2011 romantic drama, The Deep Blue Sea , and one of his greatest accomplishments, the 1992 masterpiece The Long Day Closes . Based on the 1952 play by Terence Rattigan and set five years after the end of World War II, The Deep Blue Sea stars Rachel Weisz as Hester Collyer, the dutiful but unfulfilled wife of the much older Sir William Collyer (Simon Russell Beale)
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York Police Department's widespread spying programs directed at Muslims have undermined free worship by innocent people and should be declared unconstitutional, religious leaders and civil rights advocates said Tuesday after the filing of a federal lawsuit. "Our mosque should be an open, religious, and spiritual sanctuary, but NYPD spying has turned it into a place of suspicion and censorship," Hamid Hassan Raza, an imam named as a plaintiff, told a rally outside police headquarters shortly after the suit was filed in federal court in Brooklyn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
THE AMANDA BYNES saga gets more and more bizarre, as if Lindsay Lohan being in rehab has left a void in the actress-out-of-control section of the newspaper that Amanda feels obligated to fill. ( Tattle note: We interviewed Amanda a number of times back in her "She's the One," "Hairspray" days and found her to be one of the most together young actresses we'd ever met. We were sure that by the time she turned 30 she would be running a studio. So what the heck happened?)
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A New York Police Department detective told a federal judge that he has seen no evidence that one of his informants brought up the subject of jihad as a way to bait Muslims into making incriminating remarks. But text messages obtained by the Associated Press show otherwise. While the detective, Stephen Hoban, described the activities in a new legal filing in U.S. District Court as narrowly focused on a few people under investigation, text messages show a wide-ranging effort.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Tom Hays, Associated Press
NEW YORK - When revelers pack Times Square for the annual New Year's Eve celebration Monday night, police will observe a tradition of their own: giving them lots of company. Each year, the New York Police Department assigns thousands of extra patrols - in ways seen and unseen - to the festivities to control the crowd and watch for signs of trouble. Hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world are expected to pack into the midtown Manhattan streets to see the crystal ball drop and ring in 2013.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Adam Goldman and Matt Apuzzo, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A paid informant for the New York Police Department's intelligence unit was under orders to "bait" Muslims into saying inflammatory things as he lived a double life, snapping pictures inside mosques and collecting the names of innocent people attending study groups on Islam, he told the Associated Press. Shamiur Rahman, a 19-year-old American of Bangladeshi descent who has now denounced his work as an informant, said police told him to embrace a strategy called "create and capture.
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