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Obesity

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NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Scott W. Atlas
Obesity, the most serious public health problem in America, has yet to be honestly discussed.   After studies in the 1960s clarified the health impacts of cigarettes, by contrast, smoking became an object of concerted public-health efforts. Smokers were increasingly ostracized, greatly reducing the incidence of smoking in the United States. Yet holding obese people responsible is still considered not only politically incorrect, but discriminatory and prejudiced. Indeed, U.S. trends in smoking and obesity have headed in opposite directions.
FOOD
October 27, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Loony as it sounds, it once seemed like a good idea to dress our children in bedsheets with slits for their eyes and send them out after dark to beg candy from strangers. There was an unspoken trust associated with trick-or-treating - an innocence that evaporated in the 1960s with the first reports of razor blades hidden in candy apples. The reports were unfounded, but the hysteria persisted. After that, candy was X-rayed in hospital emergency rooms and anything not factory-wrapped was verboten.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | Michael Smerconish
I have a home recipe to solve the obesity crisis. You could say it's an ingredient that could help tip the scales back in the right direction. What's indisputable is that we're too heavy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calculate that 68 percent of American adults are obese or overweight, which explains the recent efforts to combat the epidemic in both the public and private sectors. First came New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposal to ban the sale of supersize sugar-sweetened drinks.
NEWS
August 14, 2009 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want your children to eat less? Let them serve themselves. They probably won't dole out a supersize portion on their own. Or pour drinks into tall, narrow glasses rather than short, wide ones; they'll think they are getting more (so will you). With Americans spending billions of dollars a year on fat-loss techniques ranging from celebrity diets to stomach-stapling surgery, the relatively new field of behavioral nutrition examines more down-to-earth questions. Can you reduce the attraction of sweets?
SPORTS
May 26, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Deneen Young's running story started slowly: walking laps around the track at St. Joseph's University at 4:30 a.m. When she made it a full mile, a friend suggested that Young could use some company on her workouts and told her about the Philadelphia chapter of Black Girls RUN! Her first run with the group, she said, came only after she backed out once and the group's lead ambassador, Jocelyn D. Wright, encouraged her through Facebook to join them. "It's just like in the movies," Young said.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
By Charles L. Baum Mayor Nutter's proposed soda tax didn't end up going anywhere, but it did contribute to an unfortunate myth: the notion that any class of food or beverage is particularly fattening. That was the stated motivation for Nutter's proposal. A ranking city health official declared that "there's good evidence for sugary drinks' being a major culprit in the increase in obesity. " And public-health activists claimed that soft drinks contribute disproportionately to the government's obesity-related costs.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is perhaps telling that Joseph Majdan waited until he was thin to vent his frustration at fellow doctors who made his life miserable when he was fat. The cardiologist and assistant professor will say only that the poignant essay he has written for the Annals of Internal Medicine - "Memoirs of an Obese Physician" - was a long time coming. "I've always thought about writing this article because it haunted me, and it was a story that I think had to be told," he said last week in his office at Jefferson Medical College, where he was surrounded by pictures of his family, of his dogs, and of him when he looked twice as big as many of his friends.
NEWS
April 2, 2009
YOUR editorial on the problem of child obesity ("How Gov't. Makes Us Fat") could be used in a journalism course focusing on liberal narratives in the mainstream media. Your commentary about the very real problem of poor nutrition affecting so many young Philadelphians uses altogether predictable tropes, once again casting blame, as you do on most problems that are, at their core, family concerns, at that famous trio of liberal villains - government, private industry and (my favorite)
SPORTS
February 1, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Players in the NFL, although bigger and stronger than ever, are dying young at a rate expers find alarming according to a study by the Scripps Howard News Service. The study found that many of the players are dying from ailments typically related to weight. The heaviest athletes are more than twice as likely to die before their 50th birthday than their teammates, according to the study, which used a computer database containing information from 3,850 former professional football players who died in the last century.
NEWS
July 23, 2003 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Obesity is a serious concern this year in state legislatures. From Augusta, Maine, to Sacramento, Calif., the number of bills and resolutions targeting the nation's fat epidemic has more than doubled in a year. They include such proposals as taxing movie tickets to pay for fat-fighting programs, beefing up physical education in the schools, and requiring restaurants to offer healthy options on children's menus. America's growing girth has emerged as a major public-health problem, with increasing evidence of its grave medical and financial consequences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2015
MICHELE ELBERTSON, a 28-year-old Tabernacle, N.J., native is making a lot of waves as she continues on her personal quest to inspire and generate awareness about how she lost a jaw-dropping 260 pounds. In the past three years, this wonder woman has run over 38 half-marathons, seven full marathons, one 50-mile ultramarathon and two triathlons. "I hope to motivate others who have given up on life and a quest for better heath," Elbertson said. Although she has taken a moment with me, to revel in triumphant glory, the journey has not been without thorns.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just before Christmas, the Food and Drug Administration approved a drug that may be a boon to some of the millions of Americans resolving to shed unhealthy pounds in the New Year. The daily injectable drug, liraglutide, is part of a new class of diabetes medicines that prompt the pancreas to make extra insulin after meals. Novo Nordisk first got approval to sell liraglutide five years ago as a diabetes therapy, brand name Victoza. The new, higher-dose prescription product, Saxenda, is specifically for weight loss in obese patients, and in overweight adults who have at least one weight-related problem such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh and Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Gigi was 5, her mother, Sarah Eisenstein, was getting worried. A big child - born at 10 pounds, 13 ounces - Gigi was gaining weight, as the family dined on hot dogs and ate chips as a snack. Now, Eisenstein cooks eggplant and zucchini fries for Gigi and sister Isabella. Their mother learned these skills at Cooking with Friends, a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia program. Gigi, 8, tall for her age, is at a healthy weight. The program that helped Eisenstein will expand into a community-based study, thanks to a new partnership between Children's and the food service company Aramark, announced Wednesday at the Enterprise Center in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert J. Stunkard, 92, a renowned pioneer in the research and treatment of obesity and eating disorders, died Saturday at his home in Bryn Mawr. Dr. Stunkard died suddenly after recovering from a recent bout of pneumonia, said his wife, Margaret S. Maurin. A professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, Dr. Stunkard, known as Mickey, was a passionate and obsessive researcher. He worked at his office at Penn until he was 90, said his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014
LAST WEEK'S column, "Fat, Obese? Blame Yourself" really fired up many Daily News readers, so much so, that quite a few were compelled to write me. Never one to shy away from controversy, here's what some of our readers had to say (letters edited for space): Ms. Garrison, I am all in favor of people's taking responsibility for their conduct and decisions. Not everyone who is overweight or obese got there because of poor eating habits. The causes of obesity are not necessarily that one's eating habits are poor or out of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2014
HALLELUJAH! Fat is back! You'll be happy to know that after years of choking down the banal, tasteless, Styrofoam-like fat-free snacks, desserts and those absolutely awful fat-free dressings, some new research says that full-fat milk, butter and cream are less likely to make you obese. I know, it's a real head-scratcher and sounds counterintuitive, right? But, according to two recently released reports from Europe, the prevailing assumptions about fat just don't support the facts.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Drexel University study suggests that obesity is the single most important characteristic that increases a pregnant woman's chance of having a rare and heartbreaking occurrence - stillbirth. Maternal obesity is a known risk factor for fetal death, as well as for pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes. But the current obesity epidemic is intensifying concern, and prompting updated analyses of the stillbirth risk. "Stillbirths, while rare, do routinely occur in all institutions serving the Philadelphia area," said study leader Ruofan Yao, an obstetrics-gynecology resident at Hahnemann University Hospital.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps you heard the astonishing good news that obesity among toddlers has dropped 43 percent in eight years. It made headlines, and was based on findings in a prestigious medical journal by respected researchers using gold-standard data. Is it true? Technically, yes. But here are some other statistics derived from the same paper: Toddler obesity dropped 39.6 percent (before rounding off the raw numbers) in eight years. Or 21 percent in six years - or 31 percent in just two years.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A number of credible but controversial studies in recent years have found that people with certain chronic illnesses live longer if they're carrying too many pounds than if they're of "normal" weight. Now, Harvard University researchers have weighed in on the "obesity paradox" with a study that concludes diabetics who are too heavy get no survival benefit. On the contrary, the heavier the diabetic, the likelier an early death. "These data dispel the notion that being overweight or obese confers a survival advantage among diabetics," said Frank B. Hu, a Harvard professor of nutrition and epidemiology.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013
IT'S A FACT: One in every eight American preschoolers and one in six older children and teens are obese. But finally, after more than three decades of steady escalation, childhood obesity numbers are coming down! Last fall, a study showed the first glimmer of hope: that the rates were falling in American cities, including Philly - down 5 percent. Now, a study released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a decline in obesity rates among low-income preschoolers in 19 of the 43 U.S. states and territories studied.
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