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Obesity

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NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Scott W. Atlas
Obesity, the most serious public health problem in America, has yet to be honestly discussed.   After studies in the 1960s clarified the health impacts of cigarettes, by contrast, smoking became an object of concerted public-health efforts. Smokers were increasingly ostracized, greatly reducing the incidence of smoking in the United States. Yet holding obese people responsible is still considered not only politically incorrect, but discriminatory and prejudiced. Indeed, U.S. trends in smoking and obesity have headed in opposite directions.
FOOD
October 27, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Loony as it sounds, it once seemed like a good idea to dress our children in bedsheets with slits for their eyes and send them out after dark to beg candy from strangers. There was an unspoken trust associated with trick-or-treating - an innocence that evaporated in the 1960s with the first reports of razor blades hidden in candy apples. The reports were unfounded, but the hysteria persisted. After that, candy was X-rayed in hospital emergency rooms and anything not factory-wrapped was verboten.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | Michael Smerconish
I have a home recipe to solve the obesity crisis. You could say it's an ingredient that could help tip the scales back in the right direction. What's indisputable is that we're too heavy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calculate that 68 percent of American adults are obese or overweight, which explains the recent efforts to combat the epidemic in both the public and private sectors. First came New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposal to ban the sale of supersize sugar-sweetened drinks.
NEWS
August 14, 2009 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want your children to eat less? Let them serve themselves. They probably won't dole out a supersize portion on their own. Or pour drinks into tall, narrow glasses rather than short, wide ones; they'll think they are getting more (so will you). With Americans spending billions of dollars a year on fat-loss techniques ranging from celebrity diets to stomach-stapling surgery, the relatively new field of behavioral nutrition examines more down-to-earth questions. Can you reduce the attraction of sweets?
NEWS
September 29, 2011
By Charles L. Baum Mayor Nutter's proposed soda tax didn't end up going anywhere, but it did contribute to an unfortunate myth: the notion that any class of food or beverage is particularly fattening. That was the stated motivation for Nutter's proposal. A ranking city health official declared that "there's good evidence for sugary drinks' being a major culprit in the increase in obesity. " And public-health activists claimed that soft drinks contribute disproportionately to the government's obesity-related costs.
NEWS
April 2, 2009
YOUR editorial on the problem of child obesity ("How Gov't. Makes Us Fat") could be used in a journalism course focusing on liberal narratives in the mainstream media. Your commentary about the very real problem of poor nutrition affecting so many young Philadelphians uses altogether predictable tropes, once again casting blame, as you do on most problems that are, at their core, family concerns, at that famous trio of liberal villains - government, private industry and (my favorite)
SPORTS
May 26, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Deneen Young's running story started slowly: walking laps around the track at St. Joseph's University at 4:30 a.m. When she made it a full mile, a friend suggested that Young could use some company on her workouts and told her about the Philadelphia chapter of Black Girls RUN! Her first run with the group, she said, came only after she backed out once and the group's lead ambassador, Jocelyn D. Wright, encouraged her through Facebook to join them. "It's just like in the movies," Young said.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is perhaps telling that Joseph Majdan waited until he was thin to vent his frustration at fellow doctors who made his life miserable when he was fat. The cardiologist and assistant professor will say only that the poignant essay he has written for the Annals of Internal Medicine - "Memoirs of an Obese Physician" - was a long time coming. "I've always thought about writing this article because it haunted me, and it was a story that I think had to be told," he said last week in his office at Jefferson Medical College, where he was surrounded by pictures of his family, of his dogs, and of him when he looked twice as big as many of his friends.
SPORTS
February 1, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Players in the NFL, although bigger and stronger than ever, are dying young at a rate expers find alarming according to a study by the Scripps Howard News Service. The study found that many of the players are dying from ailments typically related to weight. The heaviest athletes are more than twice as likely to die before their 50th birthday than their teammates, according to the study, which used a computer database containing information from 3,850 former professional football players who died in the last century.
NEWS
July 23, 2003 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Obesity is a serious concern this year in state legislatures. From Augusta, Maine, to Sacramento, Calif., the number of bills and resolutions targeting the nation's fat epidemic has more than doubled in a year. They include such proposals as taxing movie tickets to pay for fat-fighting programs, beefing up physical education in the schools, and requiring restaurants to offer healthy options on children's menus. America's growing girth has emerged as a major public-health problem, with increasing evidence of its grave medical and financial consequences.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
It's not just the couch potatoes and video-game jockeys. A new study of sports physicals has shown surprisingly high rates of obesity and elevated blood pressure among Philadelphia student athletes. Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University surveying four years of physical exam results for students ages 10 to 20 found obesity and high blood pressure appear to be as much of a problem for active kids as for their peers. The suggestion, the researchers say, is that even participation in athletics was not enough to protect the youngsters from these health concerns.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Tom Avril, STAFF WRITER
What happens when some of Hollywood's sculpted, professionally toned bodies come to town? Over plates of grilled chicken, quinoa, and haricots verts, they talk about the obesity epidemic. Along with policy makers, physicians, and health advocates, a half-dozen screen stars attended an anti-obesity luncheon in Old City Wednesday, funded by drug company Novo Nordisk. The company, which has U.S. operations in Plainsboro, N.J., makes an injectable medication to treat obesity.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Daniel R. Taylor and Jennifer Robbins, For The Inquirer
Last week, we saw a 3-year-old boy for his routine checkup. His weight had skyrocketed and the plot on his growth chart showed that he, like 70 percent of children in North Philadelphia, weighs too much for his height. His mother insisted he was a picky eater, not a voracious one. Looking in his mouth, we could see several cavities forming in his teeth. We thoroughly reviewed his diet with his mother and discovered something astonishing. Our patient was downing about 36 ounces - more than a quart - of sweetened fruit drink every day. That added 500 calories to his daily intake.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Kids have tried. Parents have tried. Health professionals have tried. But according to the American Academy of Pediatrics Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the last 30 years. These children are at increased risk for adult diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. The annual hospital costs related to childhood obesity and its attendant problems - comorbidities - is roughly $127 million, according to the institute.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, with childhood obesity on what seemed to be a scary rise toward infinity, Philadelphia was among the first cities to report a short-term drop. With that tentative finding replicated, more or less, around the country, a new Philadelphia study has found longer-term evidence of a reversal in the 30-year trend. Considering that obesity rates tripled over that period, the recent changes are small and the burden remains large: 20.3 percent of city public school students were obese in 2012-13, down from 21.7 percent in 2006-07.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some recipes are sacrosanct, passed down on stained and creased index cards from one generation to the next. If you grew up on soul food, like Dejenaba Gordon did, collard greens is among them. "I've only known one way to cook collard greens: Boil it for hours with turkey or pork," she said. But last week, she stood up in front of a capacity crowd at the Free Library's Culinary Literacy Center and proposed something radical: Quickly saute the greens with caramelized onions, olive oil, and Dijon mustard, a compromise that preserves the nutrition and cuts out the saturated fat. The point wasn't to break with tradition, but to embrace it - while rethinking familiar flavors and ingredients in the context of 21st-century nutrition concerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2015
MICHELE ELBERTSON, a 28-year-old Tabernacle, N.J., native is making a lot of waves as she continues on her personal quest to inspire and generate awareness about how she lost a jaw-dropping 260 pounds. In the past three years, this wonder woman has run over 38 half-marathons, seven full marathons, one 50-mile ultramarathon and two triathlons. "I hope to motivate others who have given up on life and a quest for better heath," Elbertson said. Although she has taken a moment with me, to revel in triumphant glory, the journey has not been without thorns.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just before Christmas, the Food and Drug Administration approved a drug that may be a boon to some of the millions of Americans resolving to shed unhealthy pounds in the New Year. The daily injectable drug, liraglutide, is part of a new class of diabetes medicines that prompt the pancreas to make extra insulin after meals. Novo Nordisk first got approval to sell liraglutide five years ago as a diabetes therapy, brand name Victoza. The new, higher-dose prescription product, Saxenda, is specifically for weight loss in obese patients, and in overweight adults who have at least one weight-related problem such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh and Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Gigi was 5, her mother, Sarah Eisenstein, was getting worried. A big child - born at 10 pounds, 13 ounces - Gigi was gaining weight, as the family dined on hot dogs and ate chips as a snack. Now, Eisenstein cooks eggplant and zucchini fries for Gigi and sister Isabella. Their mother learned these skills at Cooking with Friends, a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia program. Gigi, 8, tall for her age, is at a healthy weight. The program that helped Eisenstein will expand into a community-based study, thanks to a new partnership between Children's and the food service company Aramark, announced Wednesday at the Enterprise Center in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert J. Stunkard, 92, a renowned pioneer in the research and treatment of obesity and eating disorders, died Saturday at his home in Bryn Mawr. Dr. Stunkard died suddenly after recovering from a recent bout of pneumonia, said his wife, Margaret S. Maurin. A professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, Dr. Stunkard, known as Mickey, was a passionate and obsessive researcher. He worked at his office at Penn until he was 90, said his wife.
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