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Obesity Epidemic

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Meeri Kim, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How to break the obesity epidemic? One city at a time. Appearing with nine mayors in a North Philadelphia gymnasium, First Lady Michelle Obama on Wednesday discussed the latest iteration of her two-year-old Let's Move! campaign to treat the nation's obesity epidemic. She announced a $1 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to create a web site - healthycommunitieshealthyfuture.org - where city officials can sign up and get tips on how to raise money for the anti-obesity effort or improve programs they have in place.
NEWS
April 13, 2006
Denial is an amazing thing. It can keep you curled up on the sofa, munching chips. Nine of 10 adults recognize that America has a weight problem, a Pew Research Center survey has found. They've seen the saddle bags - on somebody else. They know about the serious health consequences - for somebody else. They're worried about the potential drain on the health-care system - from somebody else. But when they look in the mirror or at their friends, everything is fine.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
How to end the obesity epidemic? One city at a time. That's the approach Michelle Obama took Wednesday as she appeared with 11 mayors in a North Philadelphia gymnasium to discuss the latest iteration of her two-year-old Let's Move! campaign to reverse the nation's obesity epidemic. The attack on childhood obesity needs to start at the local level, she said, with mayors and other city officials taking the helm. "There's no one-size-fits-all solution to the problem," she told an enthusiastic crowd in the gym of the Lenfest Police Athletic Club at 3890 N. 10th St. Mayors "see people's struggles up close.
NEWS
December 7, 2009
Lincoln University has the right idea in encouraging graduation candidates to adopt healthier lifestyles. But it gets failing marks for targeting only overweight students for mandatory exercise classes. Obesity isn't the only health problem found on college campuses. Why not an approach that, rather than stigmatizing one category of students, teaches good nutrition and healthy habits to all? Officials at historically black Lincoln say its policy requiring an exercise class for graduation was adopted in 2006 in response to the growing obesity epidemic.
NEWS
March 17, 2013
Now that Mike Bloomberg's beverage crackdown has exploded like a vigorously shaken 2-liter bottle of warm root beer, it's worth considering as a case study in how not to address the obesity epidemic. After a state judge struck down the regulation in no uncertain terms last week, the New York mayor's attempt to cap certain sugary drinks at 16 ounces appeared to have ended in a hail of hubris and fizz. New York Supreme Court Justice Milton Tingling - whose surname echoes the feeling Bloomberg seems to get every time he tells us what to do - found that the proposal exceeded the city Board of Health's authority while arbitrarily affecting some businesses and beverages but not others.
NEWS
October 4, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unintended consequences of computerizing care The Obama administration is banking on the idea that electronic medical records will reduce errors and costs. But much refining will be needed, at least with computerized drug orders, a University of Pennsylvania study shows. Penn researchers compared two groups of doctors on their use of two drugs with potentially dangerous interactions: the blood thinner warfarin and an antibiotic, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. To test if a hard-to-override alert would reduce the drugs' use together, the researchers had the system stop those orders for half the users while leaving the old system in place for the others.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - The dilapidated concrete playground at the Howe Elementary School of Excellence on Chicago's West Side was ripped out several years ago for safety reasons, leaving the children with no safe outdoor play space. Last year, however, the school received a $25,000 recreation grant for a new playground from Coca-Cola's Sprite Spark Parks program. At school, the children wrote thank-you letters to Coke; as homework they made healthy resolutions. "Coke never tried to push the product, and we needed something nearby, where it was safe," said Daphne Sherrod, assistant principal.
NEWS
June 21, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The obesity epidemic may be as obvious as a summer storm, but getting people to mobilize to do something about it is another issue entirely. So the gathering of 150 public health professionals at Drexel University yesterday for a summit on childhood obesity marked a significant step toward coming up with solutions for Philadelphia. And it is the kind of step the U.S. surgeon general urged in December in his "Call to Action" to fight obesity. The one-day summit here was among the first of its kind since the report, said Katherine McMurry, national project manager for the Call to Action.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Josh Gohlke
Chick-fil-A president Dan Cathy's proudly proclaimed views on marriage set the stage for the first documented case of the sky actually falling on a chicken - or at least a purveyor of fried, dead ones. The Jim Henson Co., friend to longtime same-sex couple Bert and Ernie, pulled its toys from the chain's kiddie meals. Philadelphia Councilman Jim Kenney and other big-city politicians clucked furiously over Cathy's statements, while their demagogic mirror images Rick Santorum and Mike Huckabee flocked to his defense.
NEWS
August 28, 2007 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Years after public-health authorities declared an obesity epidemic, Americans are not only getting fatter, but they are actually getting fatter faster. And most people aren't doing much about it. In 47 of the 50 states, at least one person in five was obese last year, and the percentage is rising, according to a study released yesterday by Trust for America's Health, a national nonprofit that advocates for health-risk prevention programs. In 1991, the group said, the scorecard was virtually the reverse: One person in five was obese in just four states.
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NEWS
March 17, 2013
Now that Mike Bloomberg's beverage crackdown has exploded like a vigorously shaken 2-liter bottle of warm root beer, it's worth considering as a case study in how not to address the obesity epidemic. After a state judge struck down the regulation in no uncertain terms last week, the New York mayor's attempt to cap certain sugary drinks at 16 ounces appeared to have ended in a hail of hubris and fizz. New York Supreme Court Justice Milton Tingling - whose surname echoes the feeling Bloomberg seems to get every time he tells us what to do - found that the proposal exceeded the city Board of Health's authority while arbitrarily affecting some businesses and beverages but not others.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Obesity rates for Philadelphia schoolchildren fell significantly over four years, researchers reported Thursday, suggesting that the sort of steps taken here in one of the hardest-hit cities might help reverse a national epidemic. The rate of obese local public-school students dropped nearly 5 percent between 2006 and 2010, when national obesity rates remained unchanged after tripling since the mid-1970s. Declines were greater among African American boys and Hispanic girls in Philadelphia, two groups at high risk of obesity-related conditions such as heart disease.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Josh Gohlke
Chick-fil-A president Dan Cathy's proudly proclaimed views on marriage set the stage for the first documented case of the sky actually falling on a chicken - or at least a purveyor of fried, dead ones. The Jim Henson Co., friend to longtime same-sex couple Bert and Ernie, pulled its toys from the chain's kiddie meals. Philadelphia Councilman Jim Kenney and other big-city politicians clucked furiously over Cathy's statements, while their demagogic mirror images Rick Santorum and Mike Huckabee flocked to his defense.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
How to end the obesity epidemic? One city at a time. That's the approach Michelle Obama took Wednesday as she appeared with 11 mayors in a North Philadelphia gymnasium to discuss the latest iteration of her two-year-old Let's Move! campaign to reverse the nation's obesity epidemic. The attack on childhood obesity needs to start at the local level, she said, with mayors and other city officials taking the helm. "There's no one-size-fits-all solution to the problem," she told an enthusiastic crowd in the gym of the Lenfest Police Athletic Club at 3890 N. 10th St. Mayors "see people's struggles up close.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Meeri Kim, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How to break the obesity epidemic? One city at a time. Appearing with nine mayors in a North Philadelphia gymnasium, First Lady Michelle Obama on Wednesday discussed the latest iteration of her two-year-old Let's Move! campaign to treat the nation's obesity epidemic. She announced a $1 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to create a web site - healthycommunitieshealthyfuture.org - where city officials can sign up and get tips on how to raise money for the anti-obesity effort or improve programs they have in place.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - The dilapidated concrete playground at the Howe Elementary School of Excellence on Chicago's West Side was ripped out several years ago for safety reasons, leaving the children with no safe outdoor play space. Last year, however, the school received a $25,000 recreation grant for a new playground from Coca-Cola's Sprite Spark Parks program. At school, the children wrote thank-you letters to Coke; as homework they made healthy resolutions. "Coke never tried to push the product, and we needed something nearby, where it was safe," said Daphne Sherrod, assistant principal.
NEWS
March 7, 2011
Study shows discrimination can worsen functional abilities of the obese Discrimination may help explain why obese people have more health problems than their thinner counterparts, according to new research from Purdue University. In a study in Social Psychology Quarterly, researchers found that obese people who perceived that they had been discriminated against had the largest decline over a 10-year period in functional abilities such as being able to climb stairs or carry groceries.
NEWS
October 4, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unintended consequences of computerizing care The Obama administration is banking on the idea that electronic medical records will reduce errors and costs. But much refining will be needed, at least with computerized drug orders, a University of Pennsylvania study shows. Penn researchers compared two groups of doctors on their use of two drugs with potentially dangerous interactions: the blood thinner warfarin and an antibiotic, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. To test if a hard-to-override alert would reduce the drugs' use together, the researchers had the system stop those orders for half the users while leaving the old system in place for the others.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2010
MUCH TO EVERYONE'S dismay, childhood obesity continues to skyrocket. The Obama administration committed $650 million from its economic stimulus package last year toward community wellness initiatives, and first lady Michelle Obama has put the issue high on her own agenda. There's a Child Nutrition Bill moving through Congress, too. Yet the tide remains stubbornly unchanged. Yes, I know you've heard it before, but it's worth repeating: Two-thirds of U.S. adults and one in three children are overweight or obese, which is exponentially increasing our national risk for chronic illnesses like diabetes, stroke and heart disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010
A FEW WEEKS ago, I did a health and wellness presentation to a group of concerned parents and their children at the Christian Stronghold Baptist Church in West Philadelphia. Many of the participants were surprised about what they didn't know about general health and fitness and even more surprised when it came to facts about children's health. Parents were shocked when I said many American teens have arteries so clogged they could suffer a heart attack. "Are you serious?" one parent asked.
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