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NEWS
July 16, 1990
When a miner dies in an explosion or a window-washer plunges to the pavement, it's natural to wonder how the tragedy could have been avoided. For example, were workers or management ignoring federal job-safety rules? But the most common killer of workers involves no such drama. Every year, motor- vehicle accidents kill about 2,100 people - from truck drivers to traveling sales people - while they're working. That's about three times the toll from any other kind of accident. So here comes a proposed new rule from the U.S. Department of Labor: If you're riding or driving as a company employee in a vehicle that has seat belts, you have to use them.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
A worker at a Bustleton car wash was fatally injured Monday when was struck by two vehicles. Philadelphia police said the 22-year-old man was cleaning a car's rear windows when he was hit by another vehicle, a gray Dodge Durango. The employee at Krewsin Klean Car Wash, located at 9201 Krewstown Road, was then struck a second time, by a red Honda Accord that was leaving the car wash, police said. The man, whose name was not released, was pronounced dead at the scene a few minutes later, at 11:59 a.m., police said.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Representatives from local unions picketed U.S. Rep. James Greenwood's office yesterday to protest his support of a bill targeting the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for big cuts. "We consider this bill a death warrant for American workers," said Jim Moran, director of Philaposh, a Philadelphia agency that lobbies for better workplace safety. Moran and about 50 others walked a picket line around a wooden coffin in front of the Republican congressman's Doylestown office, chanting "Dump Greenwood.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
California's Division of Occupational Safety and Health was scheduled to vote on new regulations affecting the porn industry following a hearing last night in Oakland. The issue of course is safer sex, but porn industry officials say the proposed restrictions go too far and could result in actors having to wear not only condoms but also dental dams when engaging in oral sex and safety goggles when engaging in . . . ? Huh? When the sex is explosive it can cause retinal damage or when the sex is performed near a power saw?
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
WARMINSTER Bucks County business owner William H. Marsh said he expected to pay a "substantial fine" after a federal regulator executed a warrant to inspect his steel-products manufacturing plant Monday. "This is a dangerous place to work," Marsh said of his Warminster company, American Bar Products Inc. He said his 11 employees work in a noisy, dusty, and greasy environment, adding, "I might get in trouble for saying that. " "If you want a totally safe plant, then you shut down that plant and you don't work," Marsh said.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued eight citations to High Quality Builders Inc., totaling $72,880 in penalties in connection with a July 6 incident where a 30-year-old construction worker fell 40 feet and became paralyzed from the waist down. The Bordentown company, OSHA said, routinely misused front-end loaders to support scaffolding platforms and failed to provide fall protection or training. The incident, which took place as the worker was installing gutters on new apartment and condominium buildings in West Chester, was the second fall incident in 2015 for that company, which had been cited by OSHA in March and June.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An administrative law judge in Washington has denied a motion by Pepperidge Farm for sanctions against the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for supposedly releasing company trade secrets. The cookie and snack company, cited by the federal agency for work practices that led to injuries at its defunct Downingtown plant, contended that OSHA violated protective orders against releasing documents from the company's insurance carrier and information about its manufacturing processes.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
EIGHTY AIRLINE workers in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., have asked the U.S. Justice Department to investigate American Airlines and US Airways, saying bosses routinely use racial slurs, deny minority workers perks and training, delay or botch maintenance and repairs, keep dangerously faulty equipment in use and retaliate against complainers. Attorney Brian Mildenberg filed safety complaints outlining the workers' claims in September with the Federal Aviation Administration and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
June 6, 1987 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A private study of the federal government's enforcement of work-place safety sharply criticized the Justice Department yesterday, saying it failed to pursue criminal action against firms and individuals involved in the death of workers. According to the study, 128,000 people have died in industrial accidents since the Occupational Safety and Health Act was passed in 1970, yet not one person has been convicted and jailed for criminal violation of the act. In addition, the study said, the Labor Department in recent years has referred fewer and fewer cases of workplace safety violations to the Justice Department for criminal prosecution because so few of the cases are pursued by the Justice Department.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Philadelphia Area Project for Occupational Safety and Health printed U.S. Rep. Cass Ballenger's portrait on a "Wanted" poster, it didn't expect to win his friendship. But it also didn't expect a congressional investigation as a result of a poster that accuses Ballenger, R-N.C., of "Conspiracy to Maim, Injure and Kill American Workers. " "We didn't expect Ballenger to retaliate as he did by having a congressional committee investigate whether we receive federal funds," says Philaposh director Jim Moran.
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NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
A worker at a Bustleton car wash was fatally injured Monday when was struck by two vehicles. Philadelphia police said the 22-year-old man was cleaning a car's rear windows when he was hit by another vehicle, a gray Dodge Durango. The employee at Krewsin Klean Car Wash, located at 9201 Krewstown Road, was then struck a second time, by a red Honda Accord that was leaving the car wash, police said. The man, whose name was not released, was pronounced dead at the scene a few minutes later, at 11:59 a.m., police said.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The tears were there, as usual, under a gray sky that wept along with those gathered Friday by the Delaware River for Workers' Memorial Day, to honor people killed on the job. But there was anger as well, and it boiled over at the annual breakfast that preceded a solemn march on Columbus Boulevard to a rainy memorial service at Penn's Landing. With a roar not unlike the sound of the train that mowed down two Amtrak workers on April 3, waves of railway workers rose to their feet Friday in rage and sadness in response to a call from their union leader.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
California's Division of Occupational Safety and Health was scheduled to vote on new regulations affecting the porn industry following a hearing last night in Oakland. The issue of course is safer sex, but porn industry officials say the proposed restrictions go too far and could result in actors having to wear not only condoms but also dental dams when engaging in oral sex and safety goggles when engaging in . . . ? Huh? When the sex is explosive it can cause retinal damage or when the sex is performed near a power saw?
BUSINESS
January 14, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued eight citations to High Quality Builders Inc., totaling $72,880 in penalties in connection with a July 6 incident where a 30-year-old construction worker fell 40 feet and became paralyzed from the waist down. The Bordentown company, OSHA said, routinely misused front-end loaders to support scaffolding platforms and failed to provide fall protection or training. The incident, which took place as the worker was installing gutters on new apartment and condominium buildings in West Chester, was the second fall incident in 2015 for that company, which had been cited by OSHA in March and June.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
EIGHTY AIRLINE workers in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., have asked the U.S. Justice Department to investigate American Airlines and US Airways, saying bosses routinely use racial slurs, deny minority workers perks and training, delay or botch maintenance and repairs, keep dangerously faulty equipment in use and retaliate against complainers. Attorney Brian Mildenberg filed safety complaints outlining the workers' claims in September with the Federal Aviation Administration and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown building contractor cited after two workers were injured when they came in contact with power lines, has been cited again by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA said it had put DMAC Construction LLC, its owner, Darren McGee, and a previous company, McGee Plastering & Stucco Inc., on a list of "severe violators. " Companies under his control have been cited for more than 40 scaffolding violations since 2008, OSHA said.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
JOSE DAVID ORTEGA of Camden liked to work with his hands. In July, Ortega and two other men, all three of them day laborers, were razing a defunct Blockbuster in Cherry Hill. A wall collapsed on Ortega, killing him, said his mom, Odily Castro. When she buried her son a week later, she said, the expense was shouldered entirely by the family. That's because Ortega, 40, a father of two, was an undocumented immigrant brought to the U.S. in the '80s by his mother, who was granted political asylum after fleeing the Contras in Nicaragua.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
WARMINSTER Bucks County business owner William H. Marsh said he expected to pay a "substantial fine" after a federal regulator executed a warrant to inspect his steel-products manufacturing plant Monday. "This is a dangerous place to work," Marsh said of his Warminster company, American Bar Products Inc. He said his 11 employees work in a noisy, dusty, and greasy environment, adding, "I might get in trouble for saying that. " "If you want a totally safe plant, then you shut down that plant and you don't work," Marsh said.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
For days, the workers at the Salvation Army thrift shop on Market Street said, they heard noises from outside and above. "Like a giant mouse running down the wall," assistant manager Richard Stasiorowski testified. "Every day, at some point, we would hear something. " "All of us would say, 'Oh, my God,' " manager Margarita Agosto said. " 'Imagine if this falls on us.' " But they did not alert the demolition crew next door or their Salvation Army supervisor. They said he already knew.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia contractors' "deliberate neglect" of basic demolition safety rules resulted in the Center City building collapse that killed six people in June, federal workplace regulators said Thursday. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced fines totaling $397,000 against the two companies. "Campbell Construction and S&R Contracting sacrificed worker and public safety through the deliberate neglect of demolition safety fundamentals. This tragic incident could and should have been prevented," said David Michaels, assistant U.S. secretary of labor for occupational safety and health.
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