CollectionsOccupational Therapist
IN THE NEWS

Occupational Therapist

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Janice Comfort Walsh, 90, of Gardenville, Bucks County, an occupational therapist and the adopted daughter of author, activist, and humanitarian Pearl S. Buck, died in her sleep Friday, March 11, at Pine Run Health Center, Doylestown. Born in Troy, N.Y., Miss Walsh was adopted at the age of 3 months in 1925 by Pearl Buck and her first husband, John Lossing Buck, an American agricultural economist specializing in the rural economy of China. Miss Walsh spent her early years in China, but as political tensions escalated, the family fled to Japan.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cathy Goodman, an occupational therapist from Chadds Ford, has taken a special interest in one particular and - she thinks - neglected segment of the rehabilitation population: stroke victims. May was designated by the American Stroke Association as Stroke Awareness Month, and, to commemorate that event and help to raise money and awareness for stroke victims, Goodman will run a marathon in Kona, Hawaii, on Wednesday. Goodman has secured sponsors who will donate more than $2,000 to the American Stroke Association when she completes the race.
NEWS
December 1, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marjorie Darling Barnard, 63, formerly of Glen Mills, an occupational therapist who became a career counselor, died Monday of Lewy body disease, a neurological illness, at Barclay Friends Nursing Home in West Chester. A native of Reading, Mrs. Barnard graduated from George School in Bucks County. While attending Colby-Sawyer Junior College in New Hampshire, she met her future husband, Timothy Barnard, who was a student at nearby Dartmouth College. After earning a bachelor's degree in occupational therapy from Tufts University in Massachusetts, she worked in Nashville while her husband was a law student at Vanderbilt University.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
A partially stripped car belonging to a Delaware State Hospital official who was found slain with his wife on Monday was discovered near Interstate 95 in Chester, police said yesterday. The yellow 1984 Nissan Sentra belonging to Martin Cohen, 58, and his wife, Ethel, 64, of Hockessin, Del., was found Tuesday in a wooded area off the Kerlin Street exit of I-95, said Lt. William Esterling, spokesman for the New Castle County, Del., police. The Cohens' second car, a black 1983 Ford LTD with Delaware registration number 340157 still is missing.
NEWS
August 8, 2006 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's schools aren't minding their P's and Q's these days, nor their ABCs, G's, H's or Y's, some educators say. Blame it on computers. Blame it on increased governmental pressure to teach an expansive curriculum and raise test scores. Whatever the reason, schools emphasize handwriting and good penmanship less today, and the results are showing. "Schools really are forgetting the fine motor, the social, the play and the handwriting. It's not a priority these days.
NEWS
February 23, 2002 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His voice was weak, almost trembling. He stood unsteadily in black Nikes and gestured passionately, stabbing the air with freckled hands. But Cuban President Fidel Castro, 75, had his audience of three dozen giddy Pennsylvanians enthralled. They had come to Matanzas' city hall on Thursday for a ceremony declaring Pennsylvania the "sister state" of Cuba's Matanzas province, the latest move in a widening American grassroots assault on the four-decade-old U.S. embargo on Cuba.
NEWS
January 7, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
After a quick scan of the color options, the 6-year-old girl from the Beverly School's multiply-handicapped class decided to use the blue and green sticky plastic strips to trace the letter B onto a piece of paper. It was a task occupational therapist Catherine Rainey said would improve her arm and shoulder control and movement. The girl, who has cerebral palsy, knows the alphabet but has trouble forming written letters properly. "Is that on the line?" the girl asked. It wasn't.
NEWS
February 3, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Grace C. Monteith, 107, an early occupational therapist who lived in three centuries, died Jan. 21 at the Stapeley retirement home in Germantown, where she had lived since 1990. When an Inquirer reporter asked in 2000 how it felt to be 100, she smiled and responded: "Just like it does to be 99. I don't feel any older, unless I'm trying to get in and out of a car. " "It's been a good life," she said. "You try to forget the bad ones and don't knock yourself out over the good ones.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By Michele Riedel, Special to The Inquirer
Aurora Resurreccion counted out loud as she mimicked her dance teacher's movements. "One . . . two . . . feet, switch. One . . . two . . . feet, switch," the 13-year-old Lower Moreland girl repeated, staring down at her feet as she hopped with the count. Before long, Aurora, who is called Annie by family and friends, was skipping. She glanced over at her teacher's reflection in the mirror that lined the classroom wall. "That's great, Annie," Sharon Brill, her teacher, said enthusiastically as she and two students applauded.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | By Mike Walsh, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Delaware judge yesterday accepted a jury recommendation and sentenced Charles Cohen to life in prison without the possibility of parole for beating his parents to death 3 1/2 years ago. New Castle County Superior Court Judge Jerome O. Herlihy acknowledged the murders were "intentional" but cited Cohen's mental illness in rejecting the death penalty. The jury made its recommendation to the judge in an 8-4 vote Friday. "The conscience of the community has spoken," Herlihy said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Janice Comfort Walsh, 90, of Gardenville, Bucks County, an occupational therapist and the adopted daughter of author, activist, and humanitarian Pearl S. Buck, died in her sleep Friday, March 11, at Pine Run Health Center, Doylestown. Born in Troy, N.Y., Miss Walsh was adopted at the age of 3 months in 1925 by Pearl Buck and her first husband, John Lossing Buck, an American agricultural economist specializing in the rural economy of China. Miss Walsh spent her early years in China, but as political tensions escalated, the family fled to Japan.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Michael Toner stood in the wings of the Walnut Street Theatre, nervously peeking through the curtain with his cane, and listening, waiting, for the cue that would mark the moment he had worked so hard to achieve: the moment he would walk back onto a stage. In the darkness, the veteran actor chased away the butterflies. He rolled his hips, readying them for the extra burden they would bear. He stretched and loosened the muscles in his right leg. And for one final time, he checked his prosthesis, making sure it was secure.
SPORTS
November 12, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers goalie Steve Mason handed Jackie Lithgow his stick Tuesday. Wayne Simmonds wrapped his arm around the 19-year-old and gave him encouraging words. Several players, including Mark Streit, Brayden Schenn, and Michael Del Zotto, and coach Craig Berube told Lithgow he was welcome to visit the locker room anytime. "Epic," Lithgow said in a low, barely audible tone while sitting in a wheelchair in the middle of the locker room at the team's Voorhees practice facility. Lithgow was attending Bloomsburg University when he was assaulted almost nine months ago. He left the hospital Tuesday for the first time since his grueling rehabilitation began.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
An occupational therapist says his former employer owes tens of thousands of dollars in back wages plus other damages because company officials did not pay him for the time he spent traveling between clients. In a suit moved to federal court in Camden last week, Omar Graham of Sicklerville says his supervisor at SunDance Rehabilitation Services Inc. deleted his travel time from his time records "to prevent [him] from being paid for travel time and overtime. " "We are looking into the allegations," said Jeanne Moore, a company spokeswoman.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
She had him at do-si-do. The end of World War II set off a square-dancing craze, and Elizabeth Moses, an occupational therapy student of Quaker stock, kicked up her heels, twirled her pettiskirts, and joined in. At a hoedown in Philadelphia, she circled left and circled right into the path of her future husband. She and lawyer Charles Thomas later settled on a 13-acre Deptford farm and turned it into a square-dance Xanadu. Hoedown Hall opened in the early 1950s, first in the Thomases' barn and then in an outbuilding with a floor reinforced to take a pounding from 150 or more feet on Saturday nights.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Though unmistakable in retrospect, Mom's symptoms were not obvious at first. Her six grown children told her, and themselves, that plenty of older people are forgetful. Everybody misplaces keys and glasses and checkbooks, they said. Anybody can forget how to spell forty . Boy, were we ever in denial. Our mother had - and still has - dementia, the umbrella term for Alzheimer's disease and similar disorders with little in the way of treatment, and no cure. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have dementia, which saps people of the ability to handle the car, the checkbook, the cooking.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newest member of the therapy team at Jefferson's Magee Rehabilitation Hospital has perfect windswept blond hair, loves long walks through Rittenhouse Square, and is a proud member of . . . the squirrel patrol? Introducing Ford - an eight-year-old golden retriever. His job? Offering friendly, nonjudgmental companionship, he subtly encourages patients to keep doing what they need to do to recover. "Ford is by far the most popular staff member in this hospital," chief medical officer Guy W. Fried said with a laugh.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Ron Devlin, READING EAGLE
KEMPTON, Pa. - Exhausted but joyful, a bleary-eyed Elizabeth Christman stood in front of the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary visitor center in Berks County at 1 a.m. Thursday. "We're ecstatic," the 38-year-old Allentown occupational therapist said, speaking for her husband, Scott. "We feel joy and thankfulness. " Her father, Robert Durn, 74, of Allentown, and her two sons, Garrod, 9, and Griffen, 5, had been missing in a remote section of Hawk Mountain for more than eight hours before being found shortly before 12:01 a.m. Thursday.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Had they been born a quarter-century ago, the 200 children would have been lucky to survive. These days, the issues they face at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia seem mundane by comparison. Can the children babble a few words? Put wooden pegs in holes? Kick a ball? The 200 infants and toddlers are veterans of major heart surgery, and to the untrained eye they seem no different from any other kid, but for a faint scar on the chest. Yet increasingly, researchers at Children's Hospital and elsewhere are finding that such patients are more likely to experience subtle developmental delays.
NEWS
April 24, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry A. Jordan, 73, of Chester Springs, a psychiatrist and civic leader, died of cancer Monday, April 19, at his home. Dr. Jordan, whose parents were physicians, grew up in Stroudsburg, Pa. He graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University, where he was on the crew team. He earned a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania and completed an internship and a residency in psychiatry at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|