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Ocean

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NEWS
August 25, 1986
I'm sorry that M.R. Montgomery (Op-ed Page, Aug. 20) doesn't appreciate the beach, more important, that wonderful body of water called The Ocean. Nothing soothes my "withered brow" more than looking out on that ocean and walking in it along the sandy oceanfront. He should try it - he may like it. Mr. Montgomery obviously enjoys the country paths - trees, plants, insects, animals and bugs. Perhaps he doesn't like that either. In any case, that's why we have chocolate and vanilla.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Rod McGuirk, Associated Press
CANBERRA, Australia - Australia has created the world's largest network of marine reserves and will restrict fishing as well as oil and gas exploration in a major step to safeguard the environment and access to food. With the expansion announced Thursday, Australia will protect 1.2 million square miles of ocean. The reserves will encompass a third of the island continent's territorial waters, which sustain more than 4,000 species of fish. Australia is surrounded by the world's third-largest ocean territory, which provides important habitat to threatened species of whales, sharks and turtles as well as spectacular corals.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Among my earliest memories is this one: I'm about 3 years old on a beach facing a roaring mystery called "the ocean. " I'm terrified. It's wild and fierce - and I'm so small. But my mother is next to me, and she takes my hand in hers and tells me not to be afraid. Because she is there - because she is my constant in a chaotic world - I meet that wild thing lapping at our feet. And that day, I begin my love affair with the ocean. Ever since, it's been a torrid romance.
TRAVEL
January 3, 2016
Answer: Oregon. It's not even close. Depending on who's doing the measuring, Oregon's coast is about 363 miles, compared with Alabama's 53. The measurements do not include inlets and bays.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Connors family decided to rebuild their Shore house in Avalon, they knew the most important element of the design was already in place - just outside their window. "Our No. 1 goal was to capture the views," Terri Connors said. "We didn't want decks or awnings in the way. It was a very different concept, if you look at other houses that are on the beachfront. This is probably the only house on the island with 180-degree ocean views. You see the dolphins in the morning and the afternoon.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
Sorry, New York. Tough luck, North Jersey. Try as you might, you'll get no sympathy around here. You're being required to finally make the same hard sacrifice other communities, including Philadelphia, did long ago - to quit dumping your sewage sludge into the ocean. And the fact that you've dragged your heels and thrown your weight around in Washington for the past decade or more has only made the alternatives more complex and expensive. New York City and communities in northern New Jersey currently dump more than 28 million tons of sewage sludge into the ocean each year.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
WILDWOOD - State police say a body found off the coast has been identified as that of a decorated police officer who disappeared while boating. A passing boater found Jason Sill's body around 3 p.m. Sunday in waters off Wildwood. Sill, 39, of Cape May, who served with the Middle Township police force, was last seen Aug. 27 when he took his craft out from a marina for a planned fishing trip. - AP
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | For The Inquirer / ELLEN Di PIAZZA
Enjoying the solitude and sunshine, Andreas Pukis of Philadelphia pauses on the beach at Atlantic City. Pukis says he likes to visit Atlantic City to see the ocean.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, STAFF WRITER
AVALON, N.J. - You don't expect to necessarily have a sound track, let alone a Bob Dylan-alluding surprise, found along the 1.1-mile self-guided Avalon Dune Trail, lately in the news because of a plan to cut down some (nonnative) Japanese black pines that has stirred up controversy and conspiracy theories among residents. But there it was, and it was not blowing in the wind. Rather, it was hidden behind a fence post on the 48th Street trail back to the street, and you'd either have to have a geocaching treasure-hunt app on your phone to know where to look, or, alternatively, you'd just have to follow a girl in jellies leaving the beach - who adamantly and perhaps admirably refused to either comment or give her name - who knew where to look and had signed her name earlier on the little yellow scroll contained inside the pillbox.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
When Frank Ocean surprised the music world last weekend by releasing not one, but two albums in the space of two days, it came off as a generous demonstration of productivity to fans who had waited impatiently for four years for a follow-up to 2012's Channel Orange . It was also a little sneaky, and the latest shot fired between warring music-streaming services as well as a demonstration of how those online services are threatening to make...
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Philadelphia Jerk Festival. That's jerk as in Caribbean cuisine, not your really annoying friend. Roots reggae singer Luciano and dance hall rapper DJ Assassin, who has been featured on recent songs by Kanye West and Kendrick Lamar, are headliners. Sunday afternoon in Fairmount Park. Lucinda Williams. The Southern roots music storyteller, who has gotten her artistic groove back with two consecutive double albums - 2014's Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone and this year's the Ghosts of Highway 20 - comes to South Jersey.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
WHAT IT IS - Move over apple: Scrapple is now the best-selling pie flavor at Wards Pastry Shop in Ocean City. While your dream of a perfect pie flavor may not be that whitish congealed block of something-or-other made famous by the Pennsylvania Dutch, apparently this bakery - around for 88 years and considered a Jersey Shore staple - knows a thing or two about taking such an oddity and making it, well, palatable. "I think some people hear about scrapple pie and come in and buy it for the goof . . . but they come back because they try it and it's really good," said Wards' owner and chief baker Walter Hohman, 51, who started working in the bakery when he was 12. Scrapple is traditionally a combination of pork offal - scraps and trimmings like the heart, head, liver, and bones that wouldn't be used for anything else - that is boiled down into a broth and then combined with cornmeal, flour, and spices to form a mush.
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, STAFF WRITER
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - It's the innkeeper's life to be barged in on, so Harmon Brown, 90, barely raises an eyebrow when you walk through the swinging wooden doors to the kitchen - though it is way too early to be barging in on Harmon Brown. Turns out you're not the first person to take liberties with his time that day. He was answering the phone at 2 a.m., talking to people looking to arrange accommodations at Brown's Nostalgia Bed & Breakfast in the middle of the night. "They think there's a front desk," Brown said, looking up from his cryptoquip, coffee, and cinnamon bun, still in deer-hunting pajama pants.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2016 | By Chuck Darrow, FOR DoTHIS
Summer is coming to a close, but there's still time to squeeze in a beach weekend. Some Jersey Shore vacationers are no doubt drawn by tradition: Who doesn't know someone whose family has been going to Wildwood or Sea Isle City for generations? Others may be drawn to the South Jersey coast out of a passion for a particular locale. Or mere convenience. But if our closest oceanfront real estate has no particular claims on your heart and mind (and wallet), you might consider Ocean City, Md. The other Ocean City has a lot to offer if you're looking for something a little different.
TRAVEL
August 7, 2016
Answer: The Pacific. At about 60 million square miles, it's roughly double the 29.6 million square miles of the Atlantic, which is No. 2.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
On Thursday, hundreds of tots (and other youngsters up to age 10) will promenade down the Ocean City Boardwalk in the family resort's 107th annual baby parade. Some will walk. Others will ride in style in fanciful strollers, go-carts, and wagons. All will delight onlookers. The tradition dates back to 1909, when photoengraver Leo Bamberger - who helped organize Labor Day - founded the event. According to Michael J. Hartman, Ocean City's special events coordinator and artistic director of the Greater Ocean City Theatre Company, in the golden age of the parade, attendees treated the festivities like a night on the town, dressing up in glamorous attire.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The city health department during the last week grounded several "frequent fliers," its term for eateries with a history of failing numerous health inspections. Vermin -- rodents and roaches -- proved the undoing of many of the restaurants and grocery stores ordered by the city to close down for at least 48 hours. An infestation of rodents temporarily closed a Primo Hoagies franchise in Port Richmond. Roach invasions shut down Bella T's Pizza in Mayfair, the Santana Deli in Feltonville, El Coqui bodega in Fairhill and Jin Hous e in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Erin Serpico and Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITERS
While Edward Briese and his uncle were clamming in Reed's Bay in Atlantic County on Saturday, they came across something else - a giant, odd-looking fish floating dead in the water. According to the Atlantic City Press, what the family spotted was a mola mola, or ocean sunfish. It was a little less than six feet long and missing some fins. The fish is commonly found in tropical and temperate waters. It can grow to be 14 feet wide and 10 feet long, and weigh 5,000 pounds, according to National Geographic.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
Curtis encores. The main classical season may be over, but you can revisit some high points from recent performances at the Curtis Institute of Music via videos on the school's website. Captured is a nicely developing interpretation by Bolai Cao of the Brahms Piano Sonata No. 1 in C Major , a Mahler Symphony No. 5 conducted by Jahja Ling, a Mendelssohn quartet, Gershwin and Strauss vocal works, as well as new music. When you've had enough of organized sound, click on a performance by a cellist and pianist of Cage's 4'33 . " Strangely, the performance lasts a bit more than five minutes.
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