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Ocean Liner

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NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a planner's dream. The year was 1968, and a group of investors had proposed docking the Queen Elizabeth ocean liner at the foot of Philadelphia International Airport, in Tinicum Township. There, it would be converted into a luxurious floating hotel and attraction. That's all county planners needed to get them going. Within the year, they had cranked out a visionary plan for the Tinicum of the future that included several other tourist attractions, such as a menagerie and stables inside the Tincium National Environmental Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
With the demise of transatlantic ocean liners, the sea-voyage term rough crossing has pretty much passed from the lexicon. Tom Stoppard revived it as the title of his 1984 comedy, which takes place on an ocean liner. But unfortunately, as a metaphor, it aptly describes both the play and the Lantern Theater production at St. Stephen's Theater. Stoppard, author of Arcadia, Travesties, The Real Thing and many other works, is one of the best playwrights in the language, but this tepid farce demonstrates that even a master can have an unsuccessful outing.
NEWS
August 24, 2009 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Clinton was in his first term as president when the peeling hulk of the SS United States was towed up the Delaware River for temporary moorage. The massive ocean liner has now idled in the shadow of the Walt Whitman Bridge for so long that its 12-story stacks are virtually part of Philadelphia's skyline, hardly noticed by the thousands who drive overhead each day. But the once-grand ship could soon slip away as quietly as it arrived. Its owner, Star Cruises of Hong Kong, has put the vessel up for sale.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2004 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The SS United States, docked in Philadelphia at a cost of $1,000 a day for eight years, hasn't fired its boilers since 1969. Once the pride of the American fleet, the 990-foot-long ocean liner lost out after jet airplanes took away its main reason for being: fast transport of passengers across the Atlantic Ocean. But Colin Veitch, chief executive officer of Miami-based NCL Corp., the ship's owner, says he thinks the United States can turn a profit - even though the $500 million cost of reviving the 52-year-old vessel is perhaps $150 million greater than building a new one. Industry experts think he is dreaming.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
The SS United States won't sail again. Earlier this year, a luxury cruise operator and the nonprofit that owns the long-retired ocean liner docked in South Philadelphia announced an effort to return the aged ship to its former life as a glamorous ocean liner. But after a feasibility study, Crystal Cruises and the SS United States Conservancy have determined that refurbishing the ship to sail would be too challenging, the groups announced Friday. "Unfortunately, the hurdles that would face us when trying to bring a 65-year-old vessel up to modern safety, design, and international regulatory compliance have proven just too great to clear in both a technically and commercially responsible manner," Crystal president and CEO Edie Rodriguez said in a statement.
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
After years of trying to raise money to retrofit the rusting SS United States to become a waterfront destination, the conservancy that owns the historic ocean liner docked in South Philadelphia says it has new, big plans. And those plans appear to be in New York. The nonprofit, Washington-based SS United States Conservancy, which owns the ship, said Thursday that it had entered an "option agreement" with a "major redevelopment partner" and would provide details at a news conference next Thursday in New York.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by William F. Steinmetz
The S.S. United States arrived at Pier 96 in South Philadelphia last week from the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal under the Walt Whitman Bridge. The ship, which has been out of service since 1969, was towed into the area last month after undergoing asbestos removal overseas. Owners hope to raise enough money to restore the 990-foot ocean liner. The vessel holds the record as the fastest passenger ship afloat.
NEWS
February 6, 2002
Queen Elizabeth II (I speak here of the titular regent of the United Kingdom and not of the ocean liner) is celebrating her 50th year on the throne. To mark the occasion, it would be good . . . to give thanks for the British monarchy, which Elizabeth has done so much to make both irrelevant and entertaining. Which is precisely what a monarchy should be. - Bill Tammeus, column, Kansas City Star, Feb. 5
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Dwarfed only by the Walt Whitman Bridge, the SS United States is towed north along the Delaware to its new anchorage at Pier 96 in South Philadelphia. Its owners are trying to put together funding to restore the ocean liner. The 990-foot ship has been undergoing asbestos removal overseas the last few years. Out of service since 1969, the United States still holds the record as the fastest passenger ship afloat.
FOOD
June 5, 1991 | by Anne Gilbert, Special to the Daily News
Even if the age of the grand ocean liners is just a memory for those lucky enough to have savored the experience, there are compensations . . . bits and pieces known these days as ocean liner collectibles. Those who never set foot on an ocean liner may collect ships' silver, luggage labels or tags, adorned with nostalgic names like The Normandie, Ile de France and The Breman. The items can be as elegant as a glass panel from the Normandie designed by Lalique or as functional as a wood deck chair from the Europa.
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NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
The SS United States won't sail again. Earlier this year, a luxury cruise operator and the nonprofit that owns the long-retired ocean liner docked in South Philadelphia announced an effort to return the aged ship to its former life as a glamorous ocean liner. But after a feasibility study, Crystal Cruises and the SS United States Conservancy have determined that refurbishing the ship to sail would be too challenging, the groups announced Friday. "Unfortunately, the hurdles that would face us when trying to bring a 65-year-old vessel up to modern safety, design, and international regulatory compliance have proven just too great to clear in both a technically and commercially responsible manner," Crystal president and CEO Edie Rodriguez said in a statement.
NEWS
February 12, 2016
ISSUE | SS UNITED STATES Restore ship's sparkle in Philadelphia The SS United States Conservancy has tentatively sold the venerable ocean liner to a cruise company that, pending a feasibility study, could take it to another port for refurbishing ("Liner faces a long voyage," Monday). Philadelphia's waterfront has been its home for 20 years, and Philadelphians have poured more than $10 million into preserving it to date. Why isn't Philadelphia being considered as the site of its rebirth?
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
After years of trying to raise money to retrofit the rusting SS United States to become a waterfront destination, the conservancy that owns the historic ocean liner docked in South Philadelphia says it has new, big plans. And those plans appear to be in New York. The nonprofit, Washington-based SS United States Conservancy, which owns the ship, said Thursday that it had entered an "option agreement" with a "major redevelopment partner" and would provide details at a news conference next Thursday in New York.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Monday morning marks the end of the July Fourth holiday weekend, one of the busiest travel periods of the summer, but Bernhard M. Koch, 59, president and chief executive of AAA Mid-Atlantic Inc. auto club, wasn't too worried about emergency calls from cars stranded on the highway. He and his wife were too busy traveling by ocean liner, hosting 40 automobile club members on a AAA Mid-Atlantic cruise to Barcelona, Istanbul and Venice. "Rolling into Venice on a cruise ship is one of God's gifts," Koch said.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
JEB BUSH made some very provocative comments about immigration the other day. They were red meat for a conservative base that thinks in broad brushstrokes about foreigners. Actually, they were more like a bullfighter's red cape, or scarlet blood in the water. Commenting on the wave of illegal bodies present in our country, this brother of one compassionate conservative president and son of another observed: "The way I look at this is someone who comes to our country because they couldn't come legally, they come to our country because their families - the dad who loved their children - was worried that their children didn't have food on the table.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
ERIC EPSTEIN and Gene Stilp fight the powers that be. Have for decades. They're loathed and cursed by those who thrive in Pennsylvania's political culture, reason enough to value their efforts. But they also share a commitment to citizen action in a world increasingly disconnected. These days, as elected leaders sit on their hands on any number of issues, such commitment is worth noting. "If you look at the Legislature like an ocean liner," says Stilp, "Eric and I are like tugboats trying to push the bow in the right direction.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
THE United States leads the world in putting its people behind bars. Think of this fact as a massive ocean liner whose engines went into overdrive in the 1980s and 1990s with the war on drugs and mandatory minimum sentencing, exploding the prison rates. Today, more than 2 million people are in U.S. prisons. A recent report by the Pew Charitable Trusts suggests that this speeding ocean liner may be slowing down, with many states actually working to turn the vessel around. The good news is that 31 states have shown a decrease in imprisonment rates in the past five years.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
YOU GOTTA SAY this much for the people who are trying to resurrect the SS United States: There's no quit in 'em. In April, the outlook was not good for the huge, historic vessel that has hovered like a specter over the South Philly waterfront since the mid-'90s. The SS United States Conservancy, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that serves as the ship's caretaker, was at that time frantically trying to raise funds to help cover the steep cost - about $80,000 a month - of maintaining the ship and docking it at Pier 82 on Columbus Boulevard.
SPORTS
July 19, 2013 | Associated Press
CHORGES, France - Even when he expects to lose, Tour de France champion-in-the-making Chris Froome cannot help but win. He's that strong and he's making it look easy. On a day when the British rider was planning to save some energy for upcoming mountains, Froome still brushed aside the field and took his third stage win of the 100th Tour. Alberto Contador, Froome's Spanish rival still trying to make a fight of this one-sided battle, gave his all in yesterday's Alpine time trial.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
IF THE Pennsylvania Convention Center were an ocean liner, it would be taking on water and listing badly. When the $1.3 billion taxpayer-funded facility at 12th and Arch streets opened a major new expansion in 2011, the promise was that a new, improved and larger center would draw 20 to 30 large conventions a year. There are 20 major conventions in the facility this year, but the numbers drop quickly after that - down to a mere eight in 2016. This is bad news, not just for the center but for the region.
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