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Ocean Liner

NEWS
December 19, 2001
Would you believe that the Simon Property Group of Indianapolis, Ind., really will go ahead with a $300 million development at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia? No? You wouldn't? That's understandable. There's been no shortage of false starts with this project. And no shortage of critics who would happily say "good riddance" if the project collapsed. The plan for a shopping/entertainment complex on the riverfront, melded with a new Please Touch Museum, has been a stop-and-go operation for four years.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gutted shell of an ocean liner, longer and taller than the legendary Titanic, sits rusting away at a Delaware River pier, as it has since it was towed there in 1996. Yesterday, the S.S. United States Foundation held its fourth annual meeting within a few city blocks of the ship it hopes to preserve. But the foundation has little money and little relationship with the ship's owner. And when some of the 50 folks at the Independence Seaport Museum on Penn's Landing drove to the ship, berthed at Pier 82 near Snyder Avenue, they could speak mostly of an imagined past and an imagined future.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
With the demise of transatlantic ocean liners, the sea-voyage term rough crossing has pretty much passed from the lexicon. Tom Stoppard revived it as the title of his 1984 comedy, which takes place on an ocean liner. But unfortunately, as a metaphor, it aptly describes both the play and the Lantern Theater production at St. Stephen's Theater. Stoppard, author of Arcadia, Travesties, The Real Thing and many other works, is one of the best playwrights in the language, but this tepid farce demonstrates that even a master can have an unsuccessful outing.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | By Judi Dash, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the swank Wind Song makes its maiden call on Costa Rica in December, passengers will be able to get right into the swing of the country - by careening from tree to tree along a metal cable 100 feet above the rain-forest canopy. For further thrills, passengers will be able to gallop across a working ranch with an active volcano as a backdrop. Or they can hike up the steep bank of a seaside jungle preserve, while howler monkeys and toucans hoot at them. Throughout each cruise, a Costa Rican naturalist will talk about the fine ecological points of each region.
LIVING
November 3, 1996 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SoHo is only a pretender. South Street isn't even that. Provincetown, on a good night in July, is maybe - just maybe - a little sister, just swapping her training wheels for the real thing. Imagine every other place you've ever visited and thought, "Whoa, this is weird," or "My, that was strange," or "Did you see where that person got pierced?" None of them even begin to compare to Miami's South Beach: a place so hip, so cool, so insistently bizarre (but nicely good-natured about it)
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by William F. Steinmetz
The S.S. United States arrived at Pier 96 in South Philadelphia last week from the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal under the Walt Whitman Bridge. The ship, which has been out of service since 1969, was towed into the area last month after undergoing asbestos removal overseas. Owners hope to raise enough money to restore the 990-foot ocean liner. The vessel holds the record as the fastest passenger ship afloat.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Long ago, travelers crossed the ocean aboard cruise ships. The most elegant and the fastest was the SS United States. Leroy J. Alexanderson remembers the ocean liner in its youth, when its sleek speed left admiring stares in its wake. Now the hobbled old ship, just the hull of its former self, needs tug boats to tow it along. Alexanderson, 86 and a landlubber in Hampton, Va., spent 14 years on the ship, most of them as the ship's commodore or captain. "She was very very elegant and very austere.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Dwarfed only by the Walt Whitman Bridge, the SS United States is towed north along the Delaware to its new anchorage at Pier 96 in South Philadelphia. Its owners are trying to put together funding to restore the ocean liner. The 990-foot ship has been undergoing asbestos removal overseas the last few years. Out of service since 1969, the United States still holds the record as the fastest passenger ship afloat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
For those of us who've recently been treated to Four Weddings and a Funeral, it's oddly comforting, at the outset of Roman Polanski's wild and woolly Bitter Moon, to find ourselves once again in the company of Hugh Grant and Kristin Scott-Thomas. Grant, the commitment-wary Brit who engages in that comic mating dance with Andie MacDowell in Four Weddings, here plays a similarly twitty, upper-class type; and Scott-Thomas, who was cast as his good friend and unrequited amour in Mike Newell's romantic comedy, plays Grant's wife.
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