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Ocean Liner

NEWS
October 5, 1997 | By Judi Dash, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the swank Wind Song makes its maiden call on Costa Rica in December, passengers will be able to get right into the swing of the country - by careening from tree to tree along a metal cable 100 feet above the rain-forest canopy. For further thrills, passengers will be able to gallop across a working ranch with an active volcano as a backdrop. Or they can hike up the steep bank of a seaside jungle preserve, while howler monkeys and toucans hoot at them. Throughout each cruise, a Costa Rican naturalist will talk about the fine ecological points of each region.
LIVING
November 3, 1996 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SoHo is only a pretender. South Street isn't even that. Provincetown, on a good night in July, is maybe - just maybe - a little sister, just swapping her training wheels for the real thing. Imagine every other place you've ever visited and thought, "Whoa, this is weird," or "My, that was strange," or "Did you see where that person got pierced?" None of them even begin to compare to Miami's South Beach: a place so hip, so cool, so insistently bizarre (but nicely good-natured about it)
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by William F. Steinmetz
The S.S. United States arrived at Pier 96 in South Philadelphia last week from the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal under the Walt Whitman Bridge. The ship, which has been out of service since 1969, was towed into the area last month after undergoing asbestos removal overseas. Owners hope to raise enough money to restore the 990-foot ocean liner. The vessel holds the record as the fastest passenger ship afloat.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Long ago, travelers crossed the ocean aboard cruise ships. The most elegant and the fastest was the SS United States. Leroy J. Alexanderson remembers the ocean liner in its youth, when its sleek speed left admiring stares in its wake. Now the hobbled old ship, just the hull of its former self, needs tug boats to tow it along. Alexanderson, 86 and a landlubber in Hampton, Va., spent 14 years on the ship, most of them as the ship's commodore or captain. "She was very very elegant and very austere.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Dwarfed only by the Walt Whitman Bridge, the SS United States is towed north along the Delaware to its new anchorage at Pier 96 in South Philadelphia. Its owners are trying to put together funding to restore the ocean liner. The 990-foot ship has been undergoing asbestos removal overseas the last few years. Out of service since 1969, the United States still holds the record as the fastest passenger ship afloat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
For those of us who've recently been treated to Four Weddings and a Funeral, it's oddly comforting, at the outset of Roman Polanski's wild and woolly Bitter Moon, to find ourselves once again in the company of Hugh Grant and Kristin Scott-Thomas. Grant, the commitment-wary Brit who engages in that comic mating dance with Andie MacDowell in Four Weddings, here plays a similarly twitty, upper-class type; and Scott-Thomas, who was cast as his good friend and unrequited amour in Mike Newell's romantic comedy, plays Grant's wife.
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 200 feet beneath the Atlantic Ocean, diver John Moyer swam into the wreck of the famed ocean liner, the Andrea Doria, past barnicle-encrusted light fixtures and through silt-filled corridors and dark, corroded stairways. With air bubbles streaming behind him, he glided into the first-class "Wintergarden" lounge and looked down at a huge mosaic frieze that he remembered seeing in old photographs, before the ship sank in 1956 after colliding with another liner. Carefully, Moyer retrieved the Italian mosaic and sent it to the surface, where the crew of his salvage vessel broke out in cheers.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A CHANCE TO SINK FUNDS INTO A REAL PIECE OF HISTORY Eighty years after it went down, the Titanic is coming back up. Bits and pieces of it, at least. It seems that the French government has offered 1,800 salvaged objects to survivors or their families. Of course, a centime or two is expected in return. The French government yesterday said that the items could be acquired by qualified claimants as long as they helped pay for the cost of the salvage operation. A Franco-American expedition in 1987 recovered the relics 2 1/2 miles under the Atlantic, where the ocean liner - on its maiden voyage from Southhampton, England, to New York - sank after hitting an iceberg on April 14, 1912.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | by Kathleen Carroll, New York Daily News
Walter Faber is a middle-aged bachelor whose job as an engineer for UNESCO allows him to travel and thus avoid what he obviously fears most - emotional entanglements. "We're trained to see things as they are without dreaming," insists this pragmatic man of science in "Voyager," a riveting character study by German director Volker Schlondorff. Faber is so cool and detached that he displays not the slightest bit of fear when the pilot of his Mexico-bound plane announces that two engines have failed.
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