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Ocean Spray

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NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A developer of former industrial spaces announced Tuesday that it will soon finalize a deal to purchase the closed Ocean Spray plant in Bordentown and that it already has lined up its first tenant - another beverage bottler. Modern Recycled Spaces of Hamilton, Mercer County, has reached an agreement valued "in excess of $10 million" with the Ocean Spray cooperative to buy the 480,000-square-foot plant, said Daniel Popkin, the developer. He said settlement is expected to be this month.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Facing a nationwide market glut, cranberry growers with Ocean Spray overwhelmingly rejected a proposal yesterday to sell or merge the cooperative as a way to weather the crisis. Shareholders in the nation's largest cranberry-marketing cooperative voted by a ratio of 2-1 at their annual meeting in San Diego to pursue internal measures that Ocean Spray officials say will more than triple returns to its members over the next three years. "The growers of Ocean Spray have spoken," board chairman Sherwood J. Johnson said in a statement.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The task looks exhausting: The farmers in this flooded bog are moving nonstop to push thousands of floating cranberries onto a conveyor belt that drops them like balls of cereal into delivery trucks. This is the busy season for growers like William S. Haines Jr., co-owner of the largest cranberry farm in New Jersey and a member of the Ocean Spray growers cooperative. These are also times of great economic uncertainty. At a time when more cranberries are being grown nationwide than the market can bear and new competitors are cropping up, Ocean Spray is paying farmers like Haines $32 to $38 per barrel - down from $55 last year.
NEWS
October 16, 2002 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey's cranberry harvest crests the next few weeks as millions of the tiny red berries bob to the top of flooding bogs. Beneath the surface, the harvest could be less placid. Falling prices, a key lawsuit, and the apparent decision of one of the country's top cranberry growers not to harvest this season have cast shadows over an industry more associated with festivals and Thanksgiving. Prices plummeted from $61.80 a barrel in 1996 to $19.30 in 2000. And the total value of the crop brought to market in New Jersey dropped nearly three quarters, from $29 million in 1996 to $8 million last year, according to federal statistics.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The problem is not having too much of a good thing. It's knowing what to do with it. Cranberry growers have had abundant harvests over the last few years, flooding the market with fruit now finding its way into new products and markets. Nationally, they produced 8.5 million 100-pound barrels of cranberries this year, compared to 6.8 million in 2010, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The 700 cranberry and grapefruit growers in the big Ocean Spray agricultural cooperative in New Jersey and other states as well as Canada and Chile turned out 7 million barrels, a steep rise over the 4.9 million in 2010.
NEWS
May 6, 2011
Pep Boys says it has agreed to pay $41 million in two separate deals to add 92 stores in Florida, Alabama, Atlanta, and Seattle. Pep Boys is purchasing Big 10 Tires & Automotive, with 85 stores, from owner Sun Capital Partners. Morgan Joseph TriArtisan L.L.C. advised Pep Boys on the deal. The deal follows Pep Boys' purchase this year of seven Big O stores in the Seattle-Tacoma area. "It's time to grow again," chief executive Michael Odell told me. Since he took over in 2008, Odell and his team have bought neighborhood garages, ex-muffler franchise sites, and other locations and reopened them as tire-and-service shops - boosting the store count from around 560 to more than 700, including the latest deals.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2001 | By Marc Levy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As the desperate U.S. cranberry industry seeks to expand overseas and create products to help it sell the fruit, growers are considering whether to limit their sales for a second year in a row. The federal Department of Agriculture last week asked cranberry farmers nationwide whether the industry should cut sales by up to 46 percent in an effort to dissolve a glut of frozen cranberries and raise prices. In South Jersey's Pine Barrens, which is the center of the third-largest cranberry growing state in the country, farmers were resigned to the grim choice.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Some of the Cutts family members have taken jobs in construction or other trades to help support their Tabernacle, N.J., cranberry farm. And Joe Darlington has halved his year-round crew of a dozen workers and has forgone plans to refurbish the 30-year-old office and storage space on his Browns Mills cranberry farm. They are just two of dozens of cranberry farms, comprising about 3,900 acres in South Jersey, where growers are bracing for a cranberry market coming off its worst year since 1960.
NEWS
December 24, 2003
State fruit delay may have reelection connection Micah Rasmussen, Gov. McGreevey's spokesman, says the governor has yet to take a position on a bill that would establish the lowly blueberry as the official state fruit ("Blueberry wins Senate's backing to be N.J. state fruit," Dec. 10). The state Senate approved the measure almost unanimously (35-1), and Assembly passage in June was unanimous. So what's the holdup with McGreevey? He has an eager group of kids from Monmouth County cooling their heels while he tries to make up his mind.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
Although many Americans think of the cranberry as only a complement to the traditional Thanksgiving feast, there is a desolate, swampy swath of the Pine Barrens where the bitter red fruit is king. For the cranberry growers and workers on the farms along Burlington County Route 563 - known as the cranberry artery - the little fruit pays the bills, feeds the children and creeps into the blood. "You work all year and sometimes it is not fun," said Bill Haines Jr., 38, a fourth-generation grower with Haines & Haines Inc. of Chatsworth, the state's largest cranberry operation.
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NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A developer of former industrial spaces announced Tuesday that it will soon finalize a deal to purchase the closed Ocean Spray plant in Bordentown and that it already has lined up its first tenant - another beverage bottler. Modern Recycled Spaces of Hamilton, Mercer County, has reached an agreement valued "in excess of $10 million" with the Ocean Spray cooperative to buy the 480,000-square-foot plant, said Daniel Popkin, the developer. He said settlement is expected to be this month.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The problem is not having too much of a good thing. It's knowing what to do with it. Cranberry growers have had abundant harvests over the last few years, flooding the market with fruit now finding its way into new products and markets. Nationally, they produced 8.5 million 100-pound barrels of cranberries this year, compared to 6.8 million in 2010, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The 700 cranberry and grapefruit growers in the big Ocean Spray agricultural cooperative in New Jersey and other states as well as Canada and Chile turned out 7 million barrels, a steep rise over the 4.9 million in 2010.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
BORDENTOWN After more than 70 years of producing cranberry juice in this small community, Ocean Spray will begin closing its plant to prepare for a move to a new facility in Upper Macungie, Pa., next month. "As we ramp up operations in Lehigh Valley this spring, we will begin a ramp-down in Bordentown," said Kellyanne Dignan, a spokeswoman for Ocean Spray Cranberries Inc., based in Massachusetts. "We expect some operations and personnel to remain through the summer and have communicated to our employees and local officials that there will be phased layoffs over the next six or so months.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
IT MAY BE the Elmer Fudd of poultry, but the turkey can be a downright terrifying bird. As Thanksgiving bears down on home chefs everywhere, mocking images of Norman Rockwell perfection are enough to give even a confident cook a case of the jitters. There's just so much expectation stuffed into that bird, not to mention a table full of armchair quarterbacks eager to critique this most American of repasts. Thankfully, there are turkey-day experts to come to the rescue. We huddled with folks schooled in all things Thanksgiving, wise in the ways of roasting, pie making and sides.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Bordentown City, known for its popular cranberry festival, the decision by Ocean Spray Cranberries Inc. to move its plant to Pennsylvania, far from the bogs, has left a bitter aftertaste. "I don't know what we're going to call the festival now - the 'apple pie'?" Mayor Jim Lynch said sarcastically, following the farm cooperative's recent announcement that it would relocate its juice processing and bottling operation to the Lehigh Valley. Nearly $40 million in tax breaks, grants, and low-interest loans were offered by state and local agencies to get Ocean Spray to stay, say government officials.
NEWS
May 6, 2011
Pep Boys says it has agreed to pay $41 million in two separate deals to add 92 stores in Florida, Alabama, Atlanta, and Seattle. Pep Boys is purchasing Big 10 Tires & Automotive, with 85 stores, from owner Sun Capital Partners. Morgan Joseph TriArtisan L.L.C. advised Pep Boys on the deal. The deal follows Pep Boys' purchase this year of seven Big O stores in the Seattle-Tacoma area. "It's time to grow again," chief executive Michael Odell told me. Since he took over in 2008, Odell and his team have bought neighborhood garages, ex-muffler franchise sites, and other locations and reopened them as tire-and-service shops - boosting the store count from around 560 to more than 700, including the latest deals.
NEWS
October 18, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a steel-gray sky, workers waded through the swirling mosaic of red, pink, and yellow cranberries at a Burlington County bog last week as wide-eyed onlookers snapped photos. A year's worth of labor had come down to this moment, when the Lee family and its helpers, filled with excitement and a sense of urgency, began the autumn harvest ritual. They pushed the berries across the water toward a vacuum that moved the fruit through a hose, then onto a conveyor and into a storage bin, as visitors and a class of college students watched from a gravel road.
NEWS
July 16, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
State and federal farm officials scattered across Burlington County yesterday to assess what appeared to be devastating damage to some of the crops. Of particular concern are 3,000 acres of cranberry bogs, many of them flooded, putting the fruit at risk of rotting before the normal fall harvest. Burlington County contributes more than 90 percent of the crop in New Jersey, the No. 3 state in cranberry production. Farmers and officials cautioned that the extent of the crop's loss or the potential for its survival might not be known for a week or more.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2004 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ocean Spray cranberry growers rejected a proposal yesterday by PepsiCo Inc. to buy a stake in the cooperative, voting instead to remain independent and farmer-owned. The vote - 52 percent against pursuing the venture - ended a yearlong courtship by the food and beverage behemoth that would have given PepsiCo half-ownership of the Lakeville, Mass.-based Ocean Spray Cranberries Inc. About 925 farmers, including those in New Jersey, narrowly rejected the offer. "The 'no' verdict on the Pepsi deal means the board of directors will cease all talks with PepsiCo and other potential equity investors, focusing all efforts instead on working with management to build the Ocean Spray business for the future," Ocean Spray officials said in a written statement.
NEWS
December 24, 2003
State fruit delay may have reelection connection Micah Rasmussen, Gov. McGreevey's spokesman, says the governor has yet to take a position on a bill that would establish the lowly blueberry as the official state fruit ("Blueberry wins Senate's backing to be N.J. state fruit," Dec. 10). The state Senate approved the measure almost unanimously (35-1), and Assembly passage in June was unanimous. So what's the holdup with McGreevey? He has an eager group of kids from Monmouth County cooling their heels while he tries to make up his mind.
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