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Odd Couple

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NEWS
April 20, 2006
THE ONLY way to make EMS work properly in Philadelphia is to separate it from the Fire Department. I think there should be a director of public safety, and in that office there should be a person not appointed by the mayor but placed in charge of the fire department based solely on merit, education and experience. The same should be done for EMS. Two separate departments doing and knowing what they do, not dabbling in it. On a construction site, having the electricians telling the carpenters how to frame out a house doesn't work.
NEWS
June 22, 1991
It's not easy to like Pete Rose. Even before his fall from grace, the baseball superstar turned off many who knew him. Some of the traits that made him invaluable on the diamond - his cockiness and combativeness - made him hard to like. Mike Schmidt does like Pete Rose. Whatever this may say about the Phillies ex-slugger's taste in friends (which is nobody's business), you've got to hand it to Mike for standing by his old pal and one-time teammate throughout Rose's ongoing ordeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mellon Jazz Festival rolled on last night at the Academy of Music with performances by two of the biggest question marks in the series, Michael Franks and Stanley Clarke. Never mind that it appeared to be an odd-couple booking; there were those who wondered just what either of these guys was doing at a jazz festival. As it turned out, Franks and Clarke came prepared with the answer. Clarke, of course, is the bass virtuoso whose jazz roots cannot be denied. As a member of Chick Corea's Return to Forever group and later on his own, Clarke was a vital force in the forging of fusion jazz in the early 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Pathologically shy and simply miserable, Harry (John Hannah) skulks through the shadowy corridors of a gay bar, where men pair in the dark, clinching and grinding to a throbbing disco beat. When the lights come up, this slender figure flees: His face is an embarrassment, with a port-wine birthmark shaped like the island of Madagascar across its left side. Writer-director Chris Newby's Madagascar Skin tracks Harry as he escapes his sad life in a funny old car and befriends a blustering, barrel-chested fellow named Flint (Bernard Hill)
SPORTS
May 6, 1998 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
"Mayberry RFD" meets Sunset Boulevard. That's how skeptics looked at "NASCAR's Night in Hollywood," which aired on ESPN Saturday night. Viewers know to expect little from these all-star galas, which are primarily to gawk at celebrities and see NASCAR people dressed up. While the show was smoothly produced and everyone seemed to have a good time, you had the feeling many presenters wouldn't know Richard Petty from Richard Benjamin....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Father and son Gerard and Guillaume Depardieu play father and son - a literary giant and his estranged progeny - in A Loving Father. Jacob Berger's finely tuned, darkly funny melodrama begins with the reclusive Leo Shepard (the elder Depardieu) receiving news that he's won the Nobel prize for literature. En route to Stockholm, he meets up with Paul (Depardieu Jr.), a troubled 28-year-old who turned to drugs after one too many traumatic bouts with his distant, cruel, self-absorbed dad. Paul, in a car, follows Leo on his motorcycle, recklessly stalking him along Europe's motorways.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
If you really paid attention to John Irvin's Turtle Diary, the 1985 film starring Glenda Jackson and Ben Kingsley as lonely English repressives who are liberated by the act of freeing a giant turtle from the zoo, you may have noticed a familiar face in one scene set in a bookstore. It belonged to playwright Harold Pinter, and the cameo provided him with an apt way of signing his delightful screenplay. Pinter first wrote for the screen in 1963, his debut being the much-admired script of Joseph Losey's The Servant - in which Dirk Bogarde gave a dark, witty performance as the icy, manipulative manservant who is really the master.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Tony Randall and Jack Klugman have been playing The Odd Couple for so long that they could probably do it in their sleep. But the nice thing about the touring production at the Forrest Theatre through Sunday is that the two old gents don't sleepwalk through the play in the least. These guys are pros. They respect their audience, and they give full weight. Randall and Klugman, of course, weren't the original Broadway odd couple. That pairing, lo these 19 years ago, consisted of Walter Matthau (Oscar, the sloppy one)
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | By Msgr. S.J. Adamo
Nearly 50 years ago, when Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham were growing up, I'm sure neither they nor their respective parents ever suspected that they would develop into the president and the first lady of the greatest nation on earth. I would bet that it surprises them still. It is a dazzling success story, but is it enviable? Would any American couple want to change places with them? I doubt it. I doubt that their success has brought them happiness. Success in politics or the world of finance - or even great fame - rarely brings joy. In spite of that, people still spend their lives in pursuit of those successes, convinced that they will be made happy by their arrival.
NEWS
September 30, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's lots of important news: Gwyneth is eyeing Spain. Nicole seems to have a new boyfriend. A couple of B-list actors (those requiring two names for identification) are making music, but not together. But we begin today's celebration of sizzle over steak with the sort of surreal and sublime development that makes us wish we had Tivo. Norman Mailer will be appearing on the Gilmore Girls TV show. The pugnacious octogenarian author appears as himself - a cuddly literary giant - interviewed by a trusty reporter, played by his real-life son, the actor Stephen Mailer, at the inn run by Lorelai (Lauren Graham)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
The question Sunday night, before an adulatory crowd at BB&T Pavilion, was: "OK, Peter Gabriel, 66, and Sting, 64, are here on tour together, the Rock Paper Scissors Tour. So what are these old gents going to do?" In a buddy-buddy chat at the start of the show, Gabriel had an answer: "We weren't sure how we're going to do this. . . . We're not leaving the stage, basically. " They didn't. Sting seemed changeless: He and the gym have been very good to each other. Gabriel was in some weird black running suit, which one attendant called "Pope Francis noir.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Not even the great Harry Houdini can escape TV's unceasing demand for amateur detectives. Starting 9 p.m. Monday on Fox, the famed magician, played by Michael Weston ( House ), will join Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (Stephen Mangan, Episodes ) in Houdini & Doyle , a Canadian-British period drama that celebrates one of history's more interesting friendships, X-Files style. Doyle, the man behind literature's leading skeptic, is the Fox Mulder in this duo, a man who wants to believe in an afterlife and in communication with the dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* THE ODD COUPLE. 8:30 p.m. Thursday, CBS3.   ACTRESS Yvette Nicole Brown has a new show, a new look and an off-camera life that means a lot to her. And that life, which includes caring for a father with dementia as well as her own fight against Type 2 diabetes, has taken the former "Community" star to CBS' reboot of "The Odd Couple," where she plays Dani, the assistant to sports-radio host Oscar Madison (Matthew Perry). In Thursday's Dani-centric episode, Oscar and his finicky roomate Felix Unger (Thomas Lennon)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2015
*  THE BOOK OF NEGROES . 8 tonight, tomorrow, Wednesday, BET. Aunjanue Ellis ("NCIS: LA") stars in the epic story of a slave whose journey to freedom highlights a little-known chapter of U.S. (and Canadian) history. Story, Page 23. *  THE MENTALIST . 8 and 9 p.m. Wednesday, CBS3. Maybe Patrick Jane (Simon Baker) and his fake-psychic-detective act ran a season (or two) too long, but who doesn't want to see him find happiness with Agent Teresa Lisbon (Robin Tunney)
SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
FOUR OR FIVE years ago, college assistants frequented Winslow Township High to recruit one of South Jersey's most dynamic prep football players. Oregon offered the kid a scholarship, as did Florida and South Carolina, of the vaunted SEC, and other tradition-laden programs such as Nebraska and Wisconsin. In the end, Penn State landed Bill Belton, but not for the lack of other schools' attempts. Maryland, for instance, put on the fullcourt press, a recruiting nugget worth mentioning years later, only because of the young assistants who led the effort on behalf of the Terrapins.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It's one thing to show up at your grandmother's apartment unexpectedly; it's quite another to do so at 3 a.m. after an extended period off the grid, filthy, penniless, and bereft. Montgomery Theater's take on Amy Herzog's 4000 Miles - the second production this season, after Philadelphia Theatre Company's - removes granny Vera's teeth and gives them to grandson Leo (Eric Wunsch), an Into the Wild -style idealist reeling from his ill-fated cross-country bicycle trip. Together, in Vera's book-lined, rent-controlled apartment, the two warily bond over love, loss, and alienation.
SPORTS
July 25, 2013 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
ASIDE FROM the chewing gum and timely timeouts, it is the indelible image of Peter Laviolette's tenure with the Flyers. April 1, 2012. Consol Energy Center, Pittsburgh. Game No. 79. Laviolette, walking the tightrope that is the dasherboards between benches, climbed past the protective Plexiglas separating the Flyers and Penguins and shattered Max Talbot's stick in frustration in the direction of Penguins coach Dan Bylsma - on national television. Standing in the way was Penguins assistant coach Tony Granato.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S MARCH MADNESS, Tattle readers, and what could be madder than an attractive blonde dating Tiger Woods ? Lindsey Vonn , the alpine ski racer who could pass for ex-wife Elin Nordegren 's more athletic sister, has made it official that her friendship with Tiger has blossomed into "dating," and that's brought out the comedians, the paparazzi and the oddsmakers. "The frenzy surrounding the terrible situation between Tiger and Elin Nordegren lasted for a long time," stated MyTop Sportsbooks.com spokesman Geoff Johnson . "And while it seems he has put his past behind him and gotten his game back on track, the public seems to remain skeptical.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
FOR MANY, Jack Klugman will always be the messy one. His portrayal of sloppy sportswriter Oscar Madison on TV's "The Odd Couple" left viewers laughing but it also gave Klugman the leverage to create a more serious character, the gruff medical examiner in "Quincy M.E. " His everyman ethos and comic timing endeared him to audiences and led to a prolific, six-decade acting career that spanned stage, screen and television. Klugman died Monday at age 90 in Northridge, outside of Los Angeles, with his wife at his side.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The stage at Plays & Players Theatre these days looks like a combination hamster cage/prison cell/Lego village, an environment that seems too tiny to hold several of the city's most outsized theatrical practitioners. The staging of bunkbeds and cartoon props may physically squeeze Dave Jadico (comic thespian, writer, 1812 Productions staple) and Aaron Cromie (director, actor, mask- and puppet-maker). But nothing gets in the way of the fast-moving, belly-flopping, arm-flailing duo in Dave & Aaron Go to Work , a silent film-inspired comedy that's equal parts Buster Keaton and The Odd Couple . The play, now in previews, opens this week.
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