CollectionsOdd Jobs
IN THE NEWS

Odd Jobs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Donald English walks home at the end of a day, carefully noting a haphazard trail of trash bags and empty cardboard beer cases dotting the woods along Rancocas Creek. Amid stands of turning oak, birch and maple treesloosely bound by wisteria vines and thorny bushes, he removes his shoes on a flattened cardboard box and ducks into the plywood-and-particleboard lean-to into which English, 36, and his girlfriend, Esther Powers, 41, have just settled. The lean-to is their most recent version of home in this stretch of marshy woods in Browns Mills, a rural town bordered by the Pine Barrens, Fort Dix, farms, and the cranberry bogs of eastern Burlington County.
NEWS
March 3, 2003 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe and Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Police yesterday said the man whose body was found in North Philadelphia with his vital organs removed was a jovial homeless man who would always greet friends with a "How you doing?" Police identified the man as Willie Kent, who last lived on the 1500 block of North Seventh Street. Kent, known in the neighborhood as "Pete," was a former meatpacker who last worked odd jobs at David's Market, a corner store at Seventh and Jefferson Streets. There, Kent, who would have turned 61 in May, cut boxes, swept and stocked shelves for several years.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In part, Stormy Monday is about carrying Poles to Newcastle. This is not a joke. Set in riverfront juke joints in the English industrial city, Stormy Monday stars Sting as Finney, a club owner who hires Poland's Krakow Jazz Ensemble to play during America Week, Newcastle's celebration of American business. This is Finney's prerogative, right? Wrong, thinks ruthless U.S. developer Cosmo (Tommy Lee Jones), who takes this as a sign of Finney's perverse humor. You see, the club owner will neither hire an American nor sell to one. Cosmo's had his eye on Finney's club because the corporate desperado has plans to turn Newcastle's colorful and seamy dockside into a sterile, American-type shopping mall.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | By Julia Cass, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Almost 21 years ago, on Aug. 30, 1978, the Inquirer reporter covering the federal court in Philadelphia called the newspaper's West Chester office to say that a 15-year-old girl had been shot to death and her boyfriend seriously injured the previous night in a car outside the girl's home near Oxford, in western Chester County. The boyfriend was a witness in a federal case, the reporter said. Murders weren't all that common in Chester County - at least not then - and the witness element in this slaying made it especially intriguing.
NEWS
January 27, 1993 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John L. Fimple, 40, whose friendliness and willingness to lend a hand won the affection of his neighbors, was killed Sunday night when his bicycle was struck by a car on the White Horse Pike. Mr. Fimple was attempting to cross the westbound lane of the road at 9:11 p.m. Sunday when a car driven by Clifford E. Watson, 31, of Sixth Road in Newtonville, hit the bicycle. He was taken to West Jersey Hospital-Berlin, where he died of multiple injuries, police said. Police said that it was raining heavily when the car hit Mr. Fimple.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The homeless man, doing some work for a cousin last Friday, stabbed the woman to death after she hit him and bit him on the finger, his lawyer said. George Snead, 30, described by his lawyer, Jack M. Myers, as a "poor soul," was held for trial on a murder charge after a hearing before Municipal Judge Morton Krase. Snead is accused of the fatal stabbing of Barbara Aiken, 57, inside her home on Merion Avenue near 51st Street. Assistant District Attorney Evan Silverstein said Aiken was stabbed three times in the back after an argument with Snead.
NEWS
February 23, 2004 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
The cold, snowy Philadelphia winter may have many in the region wishing for spring, but for one 13-year-old, it has been a financial boon. Always looking for ways to earn extra money, Brian knew that if there was snow in the forecast, there would be lots of sidewalks to shovel. Brian has picked up many odd jobs in his neighborhood - going to the store to get someone's groceries, taking out the trash, and, in the warmer weather, cutting the grass. He knows that working is the only way he can get some of the extras he wants, such as video games and CDs. But Brian does more than work.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | By Russell J. Rickford, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 90-year-old man from Penns Grove, Salem County, was bludgeoned to death in his home, and a 26-year-old handyman who performed odd jobs for the victim was being sought yesterday in the killing, police said. The body of Robert F. Burse Sr. was discovered by his son yesterday morning in the victim's home in the 100 block of West Harmony Street, said Sgt. Anthony Rastelli of the Salem County Prosecutor's Office. Burse had numerous cuts and injuries to his head and neck, and he appeared to have been beaten with a blunt object, investigators said.
NEWS
June 17, 2010
Herbert W. Roser, 90, a retired Ardmore postmaster, died of heart failure, Sunday, June 13, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. A lifelong resident of Ardmore, Mr. Roser was postmaster from 1967 until retiring in 1989. He was outgoing with his customers and always had a joke, said his wife, Dorothy Costello. Mr. Roser graduated from Lower Merion High School. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Force in Hope, Ark. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from Temple University.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Four fired police officers who were found innocent of drug-use charges and ordered reinstated to their jobs said yesterday their two-year odyssey through the legal system has ruined their lives. During an emotional press conference at Fraternal Order of Police headquarters on Spring Garden Street near Broad, the four men said they'd had enough. "So much has already been taken away from us," said Benjamin Noble, 36, a nine-year veteran. "We're asking that the city . . . let us get on with our lives.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013
AIN'T NO party like a Carl Dash party. From the late 1990s until 2004, Dash made a name for himself hosting dance parties and mixers at now-closed venues, such as the Five Spot, Transit, Palmers Social Club and Savannah's. He still does parties, but, over time, Dash's scope has broadened to include socially minded events such as the discussion series last summer at the now-closed Elena's Soul Lounge, in West Philly, on topics such as "What's the Matter With Philadelphia? A Black Professional Perspective" and "Black Philadelphia and the Republican Party.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
H ECTOR RESTO'S story is one of redemption. Resto, 42, of Ardmore, turned his life around after a 2000 federal drug conviction and eight years in prison . Now on supervised release, he's president of Resto Building Services, a home-renovation and general contractor in Northern Liberties. The firm has worked on single- and multi-family buildings, restaurants and other commercial establishments, and had about $800,000 in revenue last year.   Q: How did you start the business?
NEWS
December 5, 2012
By Harriet McDonald Chris was given up for foster care when he was only 3. His mother was a drug addict, his father an alcoholic. He says he was lucky: He was taken in by a loving woman who gave him a good home. But she died when Chris was 12. At 14, he began using marijuana. Eventually, he was on the streets, selling pills and smoking pot as often as eight times a day. Now 23, Chris lived on the streets or bounced around among relatives for years. He is part of a new, young generation of homeless men. The Doe Fund, the organization I work for, has been encountering more like him lately in Philadelphia and New York, where we have been working with the homeless for nearly 25 years.
NEWS
August 21, 2012
WHEN HE WAS young and dumb, Joe Bell made bad choices that resulted in a lifetime sentence, but not how you might think. The high-school dropout from West Philly took a car for a joyride at 17, got caught, got probation, then did it again. Dumb. He served time, got out and then a few years later was convicted of burglary. He served time, got out and then was jailed for burglary again . Dumb. He's been a guest of the state for 10 of his 46 years and is now free. He's lived almost half a century, and he's got little to show for it aside from an apartment he may soon lose, and a 3-year-old son he vows never to lose.
NEWS
August 19, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Like most states, New Jersey lets its judges decide whether alimony should be awarded in a divorce. Judges also determine how much is paid and for how long. Now, some advocates want the Legislature to limit judicial discretion in alimony decisions, arguing that long-term awards can discourage ex-spouses from earning. On the flip side, some alimony recipients say judges have unjustly denied them reasonable payments, causing financial hardship for a family that suddenly loses its breadwinner.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Mike Schneider, Associated Press
TITUSVILLE, Fla. - A year after NASA ended the three-decade-long U.S. space shuttle program, thousands of formerly well-paid engineers and other workers around the Kennedy Space Center are still struggling to find jobs to replace the careers that flourished when shuttles blasted off from the Florida "Space Coast. " Some have headed to South Carolina to build airplanes in that state's growing industry, and others have moved as far as Afghanistan to work as government contractors. Some found lower-paying jobs beneath their technical skills that allowed them to stay.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WORKING AT THE Free Library of Philadelphia was the ideal job for Lillian Miller. As a library assistant, she was not only able to indulge her own love of reading, but to encourage young people to read, including her grandchildren and neighborhood kids. She was able to pass on her belief that reading is preparation for a life of pride and accomplishment. Lillian Miller, who was left to raise five children when her husband died, a former IRS employee and active churchwoman, died of heart failure Sunday.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The remarkable Chester County horse named Odd Job Bob finally got his moment in the Hollywood winner's circle this week. Flashbulbs exploded over the red carpet at a Manhattan theater as Bob - a handsome Gypsy Vanner, a powerful and compact breed that looks like a miniature Clydesdale - stole the show from human costars Brooke Shields, Aidan Quinn, and Kris Kristofferson at the long-time-in-coming premiere of The Greening of Whitney Brown...
NEWS
January 12, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hobart F. Stecher, 90, of Burlington City, a former electrical foreman who served as a tax assessor, city councilman, and police commissioner, died Saturday, Jan. 8, at Samaritan Hospice in Mount Holly of cardiac complications. While working as an electrical foreman for Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co., Mr. Stecher started getting involved in his community. He started off by working part-time as a tax assessor - a job that ended up lasting about 30 years - and then ran for the council, his daughter JoAnn Tier said.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama sent brainy, demanding, Main Line-bred economist Lawrence Summers back to Harvard last week and replaced him as his top economic adviser with Gene Sperling - a Summers ally, but not his clone. Sperling, a Yale-trained lawyer (and Wharton dropout), is the kind of Washington policy celebrity that presidents from both parties have switched in and out of the job, alternating with real economists like Summers, and real-world business veterans like ex- Goldman Sachs executives Robert Rubin (Clinton administration)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|