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NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
Cable's Lifetime channel, coming off a recent ratings spurt, will beef up its original programming this fall with a couple of new daytime offerings and a late-night talk show dealing with relationships. The programming moves are the latest under network president Doug McCormick, who took the reins of the female-targeted Lifetime in 1993. The relationships program, hosted by Sari Locker, the 24-year-old sex educator and author of "Mindblowing Sex in the Real World," launches in October.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
September and the approach of autumn mean a new theater season for several Burlington County theater groups. The following is a list of performances that Burlington County theatergoers can catch over the next few months: Annie will be performed at Shawnee High School on Tabernacle Road in Medford by the Pinelands Players this month. Performances began Friday night and will run today, Sept. 18 and 25 at 2:30 p.m. and Sept. 16, 17, 23 and 24 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for children and seniors.
FOOD
October 4, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
When Ken Foster decided to consolidate his two houseware stores into one mega-store, he knew he hadto include a large demo kitchen for cooking classes. They'd outgrown the cramped space at the back of his cookware store at the Reading Terminal Market, and he believed a new, spacious kitchen could generate an important chunk of new business. The new 11,000-square-foot store, Foster's Homeware, at Fourth and Market, includes a high-end, Miele-equipped kitchen in the rear of the store, which is outfitted like a loft apartment.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | By Gary H. Sternberg, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Camden County's year-old Educational Technology Training Center has expended its role from providing instruction for teachers on how to use computers in the classroom to teaching computer skills to municipal workers. The move was announced last night at a meeting of the Camden County Technical School District's Board of Education, which operates the center in a building at its campus here. The primary goal of the center will remain providing computer training for teachers.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area children who can't get enough of school and adults who would like to continue their education may still register for more than 175 non-credit classes at Gloucester County College in Deptford. Classes begin this week and are being offered in "an effort to get the parents and their kids to come to the college" and become familiar with the programs and facilities the school has to offer, said Molly Pennell, director of professional and continuing education at Gloucester County College.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1993 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society's season-ending concert Friday at the Free Library drew but a modest number of familiar faces. Most audience members were young and hip, and some wore shorts, jeans and T-shirts. Guitarist Sharon Isbin, wearing a blindingly bright gold pantsuit and a black jacket, had come to town, bringing with her guest artist Gaudencio Thiago de Mello, a charming percussionist from the Amazonian jungle who now lives in New York. The program first devoted itself to solo guitar pieces, which were then followed by Isbin and de Mello's playing together.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
Everybody has a neighbor he could do without. Maybe the guy parks his RV on the street, or doesn't keep his lawn trimmed just so, or lets his dog leave land mines on the sidewalk. It's irritating. What really gets people on South 47th Street in Lincoln is when their neighbor makes his burnt offerings and stinks up the whole block. "The smell," says Julie Wiedeman, who lives next door to Don Moren's two- story frame house, "is just awful. " On the other hand, she concedes, it's a darned interesting thing to watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Born in a basement nine years ago, Philadelphia's edgiest film festival, FirstGlance, has ascended to the Painted Bride, where the ninth annual event opened last night and runs through Sunday. Of the 31 shorts and features screened, nearly half are local or world premieres. Tonight's offerings include Rent Control, about a prospective renter's mania to marry off the man living in the apartment she wants, and The Kings of Christmas, about New Yorkers from five boroughs who compete to create holiday houses across New York City.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Do you have an investment or a start-up business for which you'd like to raise money? Now, to that end, you can advertise your venture - legally - on Twitter and Facebook, on television, even at a sports event. Washington watchdogs have updated the Securities Act of 1933, the law that once barred American businesses from raising money by advertising private deals. The change was part of the Obama White House's proposed JOBS Act, meant to spur small business after the Great Recession.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"It is time to go to the river," boomed the voice from above. Along South Street, African drums were pounding, barbecued ribs were smoking, and jovial crowds were shopping. On sale were wood carvings, reggae recordings, traditional garments, dolls in African dress. On stage, an African dance performance was soon to start. But the loudspeakers broke in with a reminder that the Odunde Festival is more than a party, and more than a celebration of the culture of the African diaspora.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia college student Jimmy Mulholland, who bicycled across the country last year, received many offers of help after his bike was recently stolen at 30th Street Station. Readers, touched by his misfortune, were quick to offer aid after reading a story on Philly.com about his plight last week. A Philadelphia lawyer provided tips on how Mulholland could possibly find his stolen bike: Call local bike shops in case the thief or someone else brings it there. Check out the Philadelphia Stolen Bikes group on Facebook.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kerry McKean Kelly, For The Inquirer
I am sitting here with tears in my eyes and anger in my heart. I just learned that the cancer clinical trial that my husband enrolled in - gambled on, you could say - didn't work. The data show that the pancreatic cancer patients such as my husband who received an experimental combination of two immunotherapy drugs actually died a few months earlier, on average, than those who received the standard chemotherapy treatment. The results were so disappointing that the trial has been halted.
SPORTS
July 16, 2016 | Erin McCarthy, STAFF WRITER
Forward Nick Cousins, a restricted free agent, accepted his qualifying offer for a 2016-17 contract with the Flyers, the team announced Thursday. The 22-year-old Ontario native was selected by the Flyers in the third round of the 2011 NHL draft. He scored six goals and had five assists in 36 games with the Flyers last season and played in all six of the Flyers' Stanley Cup playoff games. Before being called up to the Flyers in February, Cousins led the Lehigh Valley Phantoms, the Flyers' American Hockey League affiliate, with 38 points on 12 goals and 26 assists in 38 games.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
Egan Rittenhouse - the 770-square-foot lifestyle boutique nestled inside that grand hotel off the square - is filled with beautiful home goods you never thought you'd ever want or need. Take, for example, the carved wooden candlesticks (starting at $62) courtesy of Philadelphia furniture company Lostine, with calming wavelike engravings. Or John Derian's decoupage trays - especially the ones coated in rainbow colors - and Alexander Stadler's Philadelphia-centric etched cheese plates.
SPORTS
July 15, 2016 | By Mike Kern, STAFF WRITER
IT WOULD be like hitting the lottery, except there's no consolation prize for getting only one number wrong. That's the fascination of a winner-take-all format. And the frustration. Ask the team that gets to the NCAA final and loses. Especially if it does down the way North Carolina did in April. But that's the way Jonathan Mugar wanted it. And The Basketball Tournament, now in its third year, is pretty much his baby. "Every game is a Game 7," said TBT's founder and CEO. "And there's nothing better than Game 7s. " It's what makes March Madness.
NEWS
July 15, 2016
THE AGREEMENT on the $31.5 billion state budget nearly met the July 1 deadline, nine months earlier than last year. That must come as a tremendous relief to school districts and local governments across the state that had to go through 2015 without regular payments of state aid. Now, they know what they are getting from the state and can plan accordingly. The Philadelphia School District, for instance, will get about $50 million in new money, which it had already penciled in to its budget for the 2016-17 school year.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
It is undeniably disturbing to see protesters spit venom at police officers. The men and women in uniform who run toward the gunfire while we run away from it. Who are tasked each day to confront entrenched problems stemming from the poverty and inequality tearing at our city. Who at protest after protest in Philadelphia since the Black Lives Matter movement began three years ago have done an exceptional job of making sure all voices are heard - even the voices of those spitting in their faces.
NEWS
July 11, 2016
How did you like the "Outlander" finale? Reviews were great and not so , but that's been the case all season long. We acknowledge there was some slow going in a few of the Paris-set episodes, but producer Ron D. Moore delivered a deeply satisfying TV version of the complicated novel "Dragonfly in Amber," the second in the Diana Gabaldon series. Whatever you thought of this character or that plot line (Brianna and Roger, thumbs up or down?), all that really matters is Jamie and Claire, played so ably, critics agree, by Sam Heughan and Caitriona Balfe.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
On a gritty block on Berks Street in Kensington just west of the El, the land speculators come knocking - knocking on the doors of men trapped by love. There's factory owner Michael DiPietro, an escapee from corporate, in love with the idea of being a man who makes things and who makes things happen, who handles deals, sales, and loading docks, and has a fresh idea every minute. "A builder told me he could put eight houses in here," said DiPietro, whose factory has recently been sold and whose businesses, Penn Scale Manufacturing Inc. and DuraCart USA, may soon be evicted from the two-story plant he has rented since 2011.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Name: KidsTravel Books.com. What it does: You can browse children's books from all over the world to learn about other cultures, prepare for a trip, read book reviews and author interviews, get family travel tips, and more. What's hot : The depth of global coverage on Kids TravelBooks is unexpected and comprehensive, with books arranged by continent and country. I want to go to the Dominican Republic, but I'm not quite ready to book a flight. I wondered if it had any kids' books on it, clicked the link, and found four books that I could buy that might help me make a decision.
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