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NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
Cable's Lifetime channel, coming off a recent ratings spurt, will beef up its original programming this fall with a couple of new daytime offerings and a late-night talk show dealing with relationships. The programming moves are the latest under network president Doug McCormick, who took the reins of the female-targeted Lifetime in 1993. The relationships program, hosted by Sari Locker, the 24-year-old sex educator and author of "Mindblowing Sex in the Real World," launches in October.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
September and the approach of autumn mean a new theater season for several Burlington County theater groups. The following is a list of performances that Burlington County theatergoers can catch over the next few months: Annie will be performed at Shawnee High School on Tabernacle Road in Medford by the Pinelands Players this month. Performances began Friday night and will run today, Sept. 18 and 25 at 2:30 p.m. and Sept. 16, 17, 23 and 24 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for children and seniors.
FOOD
October 4, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
When Ken Foster decided to consolidate his two houseware stores into one mega-store, he knew he hadto include a large demo kitchen for cooking classes. They'd outgrown the cramped space at the back of his cookware store at the Reading Terminal Market, and he believed a new, spacious kitchen could generate an important chunk of new business. The new 11,000-square-foot store, Foster's Homeware, at Fourth and Market, includes a high-end, Miele-equipped kitchen in the rear of the store, which is outfitted like a loft apartment.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | By Gary H. Sternberg, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Camden County's year-old Educational Technology Training Center has expended its role from providing instruction for teachers on how to use computers in the classroom to teaching computer skills to municipal workers. The move was announced last night at a meeting of the Camden County Technical School District's Board of Education, which operates the center in a building at its campus here. The primary goal of the center will remain providing computer training for teachers.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area children who can't get enough of school and adults who would like to continue their education may still register for more than 175 non-credit classes at Gloucester County College in Deptford. Classes begin this week and are being offered in "an effort to get the parents and their kids to come to the college" and become familiar with the programs and facilities the school has to offer, said Molly Pennell, director of professional and continuing education at Gloucester County College.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1993 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society's season-ending concert Friday at the Free Library drew but a modest number of familiar faces. Most audience members were young and hip, and some wore shorts, jeans and T-shirts. Guitarist Sharon Isbin, wearing a blindingly bright gold pantsuit and a black jacket, had come to town, bringing with her guest artist Gaudencio Thiago de Mello, a charming percussionist from the Amazonian jungle who now lives in New York. The program first devoted itself to solo guitar pieces, which were then followed by Isbin and de Mello's playing together.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
Everybody has a neighbor he could do without. Maybe the guy parks his RV on the street, or doesn't keep his lawn trimmed just so, or lets his dog leave land mines on the sidewalk. It's irritating. What really gets people on South 47th Street in Lincoln is when their neighbor makes his burnt offerings and stinks up the whole block. "The smell," says Julie Wiedeman, who lives next door to Don Moren's two- story frame house, "is just awful. " On the other hand, she concedes, it's a darned interesting thing to watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Born in a basement nine years ago, Philadelphia's edgiest film festival, FirstGlance, has ascended to the Painted Bride, where the ninth annual event opened last night and runs through Sunday. Of the 31 shorts and features screened, nearly half are local or world premieres. Tonight's offerings include Rent Control, about a prospective renter's mania to marry off the man living in the apartment she wants, and The Kings of Christmas, about New Yorkers from five boroughs who compete to create holiday houses across New York City.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Do you have an investment or a start-up business for which you'd like to raise money? Now, to that end, you can advertise your venture - legally - on Twitter and Facebook, on television, even at a sports event. Washington watchdogs have updated the Securities Act of 1933, the law that once barred American businesses from raising money by advertising private deals. The change was part of the Obama White House's proposed JOBS Act, meant to spur small business after the Great Recession.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"It is time to go to the river," boomed the voice from above. Along South Street, African drums were pounding, barbecued ribs were smoking, and jovial crowds were shopping. On sale were wood carvings, reggae recordings, traditional garments, dolls in African dress. On stage, an African dance performance was soon to start. But the loudspeakers broke in with a reminder that the Odunde Festival is more than a party, and more than a celebration of the culture of the African diaspora.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Atlantic City is attempting today to sell $40.56 million in bonds to repay a state loan issued in December when the financially beleaguered city was shut out of the bond market over concerns that the city would default. This time Atlantic City is using a New Jersey program established by the Municipal Qualfied Bond Act that diverts state aid into a fund to repay bonds. Moody's Investors Service said in a note that the state backing "should improve the city's market access," but warned the city still faces numerous financial challenges, including a $101 million deficit this year and thousands of property-tax appeals.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
JetBlue Airways will begin nonstop flights from Philadelphia International Airport to Fort Lauderdale on Nov. 19. The New York-based carrier will offer an introductory $49 one-way fare until midnight Tuesday, May 19. Currently, JetBlue has five daily nonstop flights between Philadelphia and Boston. The Fort Lauderdale flights will be twice daily, departing Philadelphia at 7:30 a.m. and 1:05 p.m. and leaving Florida at 9:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. lloyd@phillynews.com 215-854-2831  
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Chris Christie, then the U.S. attorney for New Jersey, declared in 2004 that an indictment of a fund-raiser for Gov. Jim McGreevey painted "a very vivid picture of the corrupt and broken political system in the state of New Jersey. " Preet Bharara, the top federal prosecutor in Manhattan, said in January that corruption charges against New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver exposed "the very core of what ails Albany: lack of transparency, lack of accountability, and lack of principle joined with overabundance of greed, cronyism, and self-dealing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
She garnered worldwide acclaim - and an Oscar nomination - in 1997 for her role as a porn star in Boogie Nights . But Julianne Moore's breakout role came three years earlier, as Yelena in Louis Malle and Andre Gregory's Chekhov riff, Vanya on 42nd Street . On screen in virtually every scene, Moore radiated an aura both intelligent and sensual. A year later, she confirmed her ascendancy as a great actor in Todd Haynes' dystopian New Age satire Safe . The Boston University alumnus, who has made more than 60 films, finally won her first Oscar last year for Still Alice ,   a powerful drama about language, memory, and identity that was released Tuesday by Sony.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
While just two of City Council's 10 district seats are contested in the May 19 primary, those races have offered some of the election season's biggest fireworks. On Tuesday, voters will choose between Councilman Kenyatta Johnson and challenger Ori Feibush, who have clashed over development in the rapidly changing Second District. In the Seventh District, the race is between Councilwoman Maria Quiñones Sánchez and Manny Morales, who came under fire for racist and antigay posts found on his Facebook page.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Norman Mayersohn, For The Inquirer
Much like trying to make a rational choice in the cereal aisle of a supermarket, picking a motorcycle from the staggering selection available in dealers' showrooms can be an overwhelming proposition. The Honda CBR650F, introduced as an all-new model for 2014, offers something of an antidote to the epidemic of specialization that has swept through the industry. A market that once had just a single divide - highway motorcycle or off-road machine, take your choice - has become increasingly focused on serving every possible niche of customer interest.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County Police Department, which for two years has patrolled only the city of Camden, hopes to begin justifying its broader ambition by wooing a second town into its fold - Pennsauken Township. County officials are expected to submit a detailed proposal this month to Pennsauken that would spell out how a county-run department would function in place of the township's current force, The Inquirer has learned. Pennsauken Public Safety Director John Kneib stressed in an interview that the report would be just an early look at the idea, and that any final decision - which he said would require the support of residents and township police officers - was far off. "It's got to blow us away," he said of the county's expected pitch.
SPORTS
May 9, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
NEW YORK - Matt Harvey was dressed and on his way out of the Mets clubhouse at Citi Field late Wednesday night when he stopped to consider the consequences of the choice that changed his life and career. He will pitch against Cole Hamels and the Phillies on Friday, arriving as Major League Baseball's best starter and the biggest star in its biggest market: a 5-0 record, a 2.41 earned run average, 34 strikeouts in 332/3 innings, an average of 40,450 people in attendance for each of his last four outings.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In response to requests from traveling mothers, Philadelphia International Airport and Minute Suites, a micro-hotel inside security and near the airline gates, are making private rooms available to mothers to breast-feed or pump breast milk between flights. Minute Suites opened at the airport in spring 2011 between Terminal A and Concourse B, with 13 private rooms for passengers to nap, relax, or work. The rooms, seven feet by eight feet, will be free to nursing mothers for the first 30 minutes, and cost $14 for an additional half-hour.
SPORTS
May 4, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chip Kelly said that the Eagles have yet to receive trade offers for Evan Mathis, even though the all-pro guard has been on the market the last two offseasons. Mathis wants his contract restructured. The Eagles have declined to renegotiate, but they have allowed his agent, Drew Rosenhaus, to shop for a new team and a new deal. "That's through his agent and him," Kelly said Saturday. "They've asked if he could renegotiate a contract and see what he could get, and we've obliged him with that, but we've never had an offer.
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