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NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Neshaminy Adult School will conduct registration for its fall classes on Wednesday and Thursday. The school offers more than 100 evening classes in a variety of subject areas. Registration is scheduled from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at Neshaminy High School on Old Lincoln Highway in Langhorne and from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday at Carl Sandburg Middle School on Harmony Road in Levittown. Classes, which will begin the week of Oct. 5, will take place at Neshaminy High School, Carl Sandburg Middle School, Poquessing Middle School, and Neshaminy Middle School.
NEWS
October 18, 1999 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, and Alletta Emeno, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Paul Barteld isn't sure whether his 7-year-old son will ever ride a roller coaster again. Michael Barteld, of Pine Hill, was aboard the Wild Wonder coaster on Ocean City's boardwalk on Aug. 28 when the car ahead malfunctioned, plummeted backward 40 feet, tore around a sharp corner, and slammed into his car. A mother and daughter, Kimberly Bailey, 39, and Jessica Bailey, 8, of Pomona, N.Y., were thrown from the crashing car and killed. "It was very scary for him," said Paul Barteld, whose son was cut and bruised.
NEWS
September 23, 2009 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $1,000 reward is being offered for the conviction of whoever body-wrapped a cat in duct tape and abandoned it in a North Philadelphia yard. Only its head was uncovered. "Whoever did this is very sick," said George Bengal, director investigations for the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, which is headquartered in North Philadelphia. "I've never seen a cat totally wrapped like a mummy before," he told 6ABC. A resident of the 2200 block of Edgley Street found the cat yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
January 28, 1988 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Accused swindler John Peter Galanis was charged with fraud, conspiracy and business-law violations yesterday in a 105-count indictment alleging he was the mastermind in a series of multimillion-dollar investment scams, including Atlantic City's failed Boardwalk Marketplace. The indictment, returned by a New York state grand jury, accuses Galanis, 44, of being the hidden principal behind a series of fraudulent tax shelter deals, in which investors lost $150 million. The deals included Boardwalk Marketplace, which fell through in 1986 after investors from through the country put about $75 million into nine limited partnerships set up to fund it. Galanis, who remains free on $10 million bail after a hearing yesterday before Judge Harold Rothwax, denied the charges as he left the courtroom.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. George Washington might not have slept in Quakertown, but the Liberty Bell did spend the night in this Upper Bucks County borough back in 1777. Unlike the patriots who were moving it out of the reach of the British occupiers of Philadelphia, the bell didn't stay at the nearby Red Lion Inn, but in the back of Evan Foulke's house at 1237 W. Broad St. Both the Foulke house and the inn remain - just two of the many places that make this borough both historic and, as Coldwell Banker Heritage agent Michele Samph emphasizes, "quaint.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | By Thomas Turcol and Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Amid criticism over his proposed hiring by a local college, Camden County's top administrator changed course yesterday and accepted a corporate job in Philadelphia. The decision by Louis S. Bezich came on the eve of tonight's planned vote by the Camden County College Board of Trustees on a proposal to hire him to a newly created $89,000-a-year position of vice president for administration. The plan was viewed by some college officials and Democratic insiders as an attempt to ease Bezich out of his government post so that problems surrounding his tenure would not damage U.S. Rep. Robert E. Andrews and other Camden County Democrats in this fall's elections.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2001 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The crisis at Zany Brainy Inc. is deepening. With the King of Prussia retailer's cash almost gone, a major toy supplier said yesterday that it had halted shipments to Zany Brainy warehouses until the company solved its most pressing problem: finding a willing banker within two weeks. First Union Corp. froze Zany's credit line last month, and raised the interest rate on its outstanding loans, saying Zany was in default. The bank first became troubled after it inventoried the toys in Zany's warehouses, and placed a lower value on them than it had expected.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
A day in the life of a Philadelphia pop-up beer garden begins hours before the suds start to flow. At 11:30 on an overcast Sunday morning, Jason Blacketer was doing battle with mulberries, clearing the spiky orange-reddish fruits that had fallen from a giant tree in the once-fallow lot tended by the Philadelphia Horticultural Society at 15th and South streets. Blacketer wiped the remnants of the early morning rain, from the tables and chairs. More unwelcome weather was forecast.
NEWS
December 30, 2007 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Brick calls it "the hangover circuit. " It happens November through New Year's Eve, when the Solebury scientist and researcher starts getting calls from people wanting to know the skinny on that nauseating, head-throbbing, hand-shaking experience. Why do sufferers see rooms that spin, get headaches that are mind-numbing, and maybe even wake up next to people they don't remember? After 30 years of studying the effects of drugs and alcohol, Brick has become a go-to guy. This year, he decided to write it all down in The Doctor's Hangover Handbook: The Intelligent Person's Guide to Curious and Scientific Facts About Alcohol and Hangovers.
NEWS
August 1, 2004 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In 1684, eight years before the infamous Salem witch trials, Pennsylvania had its own witch investigation. But thanks to the careful handling of the case by William Penn, Pennsylvania was spared the hysteria that was the hallmark of the trials in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During the 18th century, people in both the Old World and the New World believed that witches existed, that they were agents of the Devil, and that their mission was to put curses on both man and beasts. Early in 1684, a grand jury in Philadelphia indicted two women, Margaret Mattson and a Mrs. Hendrickson, on the charge of practicing witchcraft.
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