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Office Development

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NEWS
November 20, 1988 | By William Tuthill, Special to The Inquirer
About a dozen residents from the Swedesford Road area in Tredyffrin Township attended a Planning Commission meeting Thursday night to oppose a proposed office development in their neighborhood. The residents, members of a coalition calling itself "Maintain the Residential Character of Tredyffrin Township," said they strongly oppose a request by Spinnaker Mallard Associates for a rezoning of an 11-acre tract from residential to professional district. "This residential corner of the township has been inundated with non- residential uses," the residents said in a letter to the commission.
NEWS
November 9, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
In a close vote, the Easttown Planning Commission has recommended approval of a plan to build offices rather than houses on an eight-acre tract at 430 Lancaster Ave. in Devon. The recommendation will be reviewed by the Easttown Board of Supervisors. The development plan has been a source of controversy for months among the neighbors. At a planning commission meeting Wednesday night, the dispute was reflected in both the 3-2 vote by the commission members and their public comments.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
The Charlestown Board of Supervisors turned a cold shoulder Monday night to final plans for a three-building office development on Phoenixville Pike. Although the supervisors did not formally reject the blueprints for the 9.3-acre LauraBrooke office condominium site, they lambasted its designers for pressuring the board to approve changes in the plan barely a week after presenting those changes to the township Planning Commission. "You can't expect the board to act overnight.
NEWS
November 25, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hampton N.E. Associates, an Allentown real-estate investor, was the highest of six bidders in the second round of bidding for the Eastern State School and Hospital property. Hampton N.E. Associates, which is the parent company of several real-estate development and investment groups, bid $8.5 million - $500,000 more than the next highest bidder - for the 101 acres off Route 1 near Neshaminy Mall. The Hampton bid also was more than $2 million higher than the state's $6.4 appraisal of the property.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Willistown supervisors have approved the 62-townhouse Worington Commons plan, part of the Willistown Woods development on West Chester Pike. The supervisors approved the plans Tuesday night, but they said building permits would not be issued until the state Department of Environmental Resources approved tying in the additional units to the existing sewage treatment plant. The approval came after a lengthy discussion over a dispute between Stewart Lundy, the developer's attorney, and Howard Marcu, attorney for the owner of 10 acres surrounded by the Willistown Woods development.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Mary K. Schottmiller, Special to The Inquirer
The Malvern Borough Planning Commission postponed action Thursday on a proposal to build an office park in northeast Malvern after the developer accused commission Chairman Thomas A. Randolph of bias. Pen-Del Real Estate Co., the developer, asked for the rezoning of 5.85 acres from residential to light industrial. Malvern has no zoning designation precisely for office development. Lenny Feinberg, of Pen-Del Co., told Randolph: "We feel that you have personal problems against our company, and that's why you're blocking the development.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Willard G. Rouse 3d always liked to remind his critics of one thing: The bucolic landscape at Church Farm School here inevitably would be developed, and his organization was the best one to do it. Keeping this prime chunk of Chester County real estate open and free of development, he said, was simply not possible. But six years after Rouse first advanced his idea of a billion-dollar mini- city called Churchill, it turns out that, indeed, open space is the option. Joseph Kenna, chairman of the Chester County Commissioners, recalls all of Rouse's propaganda.
NEWS
June 29, 1991
Bit by bit, waterfront development is happening.And the lesson seems to be that office development is out - leisure activities are the way to go. Jump in a cigarette boat, tap your feet to great jazz, oooow and ahhhh at Fourth of July fireworks, sip a cocktail beneath a beach umbrella, or wriggle your toes in sand - it's all possible down at Philadelphia's river front, in and around Penn's Landing. And so the natural question is, why would anybody be fretting about future development plans for this stretch of Delaware River frontage?
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By A. Scott Kraus, Special to The Inquirer
First, residents in the Whiteland Crest development got mad. Then they got organized. Upset by reports that a proposal by Hough/Loew Associates Inc. of Exton would put the Route 30/100 bypass through their neighborhood - and about 50 feet via Bartlett Avenue from Exton Elementary School - residents formed the Whiteland Crest Civic Association to fight it. "We'd like to quickly nip in the bud any ideas of pursuing this project," said...
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NEWS
June 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Long wallowing in deterioration and neglect, Philadelphia's East Market neighborhood is on the verge of becoming a lively bridge between City Hall and Independence Mall. Though grateful for the corridor's upward momentum, the city should not be so desperate as to accept whatever is offered by developers who also stand to benefit from the transformation. Plans to refurbish the dowdy Gallery mall are vague so far, though the developers, Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust and California-based Macerich, promise a better flow of foot traffic between the street and shops, as well as more glass and other architectural flourishes.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In gritty urban centers such as Hoboken, Jersey City, and Philadelphia, manufacturing's decline left behind carcasses of abandoned factories in the 1960s and 1970s. In some neighborhoods, those same battered bastions of industry have been reborn as chic lofts for latte-drinking millennials or charmingly reconfigured as offices with open floor plans and coffee bars. These days, there's another type of building carcass worrying urban planners, government officials, and developers.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
Philadelphia's dominant office landlord is speeding plans to put apartments on its vacant land. "Residential, retail and hotel land values have been accelerating faster than what we have seen for office development," Brandywine Realty Trust chief executive Jerry Sweeney told me Wednesday, explaining the shift. Brandywine controls five of the 10 biggest office towers in Center City, and suburban office centers around Philadelphia, Washington, Richmond, Va., and Austin, Texas.
NEWS
January 11, 2006 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As his second term began, Mayor Street announced an ambitious plan to raise $500 million for riverfront development for the city. Now, after two years of unsuccessful wrangling with City Council for funds, Street has decided to pursue just a quarter of the money he originally wanted. The decision to shrink the program follows the administration's failure to garner enough City Council support to spend even an initial $125 million. City Commerce Director Stephanie Naidoff said the administration had been considering reducing the fund since the spring.
NEWS
January 11, 2005 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moving to counter complaints that a 5,000-machine slot parlor in Center City would clog nearby streets, the owner of one potential site says most gamblers would come by foot and public transit, not car or chartered bus. A decision on where to put one of two Philadelphia slot parlors is more than six months away, but jockeying for public opinion is well under way. Last month, Caesars Entertainment Inc. presented plans for a $350 million development...
BUSINESS
April 1, 2004 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Great Valley Corporate Center, the pioneering suburban office park started by Willard G. Rouse III 30 years ago, is entering its fourth architectural period. In the beginning, buildings were designed to blend into the farmhouses and wheat fields that dominated the area, recalls architect Daniel Cathers, designer of many buildings in the 700-acre complex between Routes 202 and 29, in East Whiteland. "The warm-country look worked for a while," he said. Later came buildings with a metallic high-tech look and feel, followed by the precast-concrete-and-glass style that evolved as suburban offices gained popularity.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2003 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With its office vacancy rate creeping past 25 percent, there's a lot of talk these days about the Conshohocken area's being overbuilt. And tied up in traffic. To the developer of the community's largest office park, Tower Bridge, such talk brings a sense of deja vu. "We've been through cycles before," said Donald Pulver, chief executive officer of the Oliver Tyrone Pulver Corp. "One Tower Bridge opened in a time similar to this, the recession of 1990. " Conshohocken will prevail because it is close to choice residential areas and at an expressway interchange in the center of the region, he said.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A new player - the state Department of Environmental Protection - may have entered the redevelopment sweepstakes here. Mayor Ted LeBlanc said yesterday that, last Saturday, he showed representatives from DEP and O'Neill Properties of Wayne several locations - all within a short walk of the Montgomery County Courthouse - for an office building that could house the agency and other tenants. According to the mayor, he and O'Neill favor the former McDonald's property at Main and Cherry Streets, which is about a block from the courthouse and Hancock Square.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | By Ewart Rouse, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last spring, Davis Enterprises caused a buzz in South Jersey's real-estate-development community. It started construction of a two-story, 40,000-square-foot office building at Sagemore, its mixed-use development on Route 73 in Marlton, without having lined up a single tenant for it. Last month, Liberty Property Trust also jumped into the speculative or "spec" market, breaking ground for a one-story, 35,000-square-foot office building at...
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After almost two hours of discussion on a controversial proposed office development off Lindenhurst Road, the Newtown Planning Commission Tuesday night postponed further discussion and a vote until its May 19 meeting. The 24-acre site already is zoned for office and research use. The project manager, J. Halleck Hoeland of Princeton Development Group, repeatedly assured the commission that the developer and the owner, Community Association Underwriters (CAU), would comply fully with local ordinances despite numerous details that remain to be settled.
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