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Office Furniture

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BUSINESS
December 5, 1986 | By James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writer
The majority stockholder of Knoll International, a maker of quality office furniture with its major domestic production plant in Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, yesterday said it would buy up Knoll's outstanding stock and take the firm private. The proposed buy-out by General Felt Industries Inc. of New York is for $12 a share, or a total of $38.2 million. Knoll's board of directors has approved the deal. GFI currently owns about 70 percent of Knoll's stock. Frederick Marcus, a director of Knoll and the company's head of investor relations, said the buy-out comes following the firm's first unprofitable quarter since the company went public in August 1983.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares in Knoll Inc., a Montgomery County manufacturer of office furniture, gained $2.10 to close at $17.10 yesterday, its first day of trading in an initial public offering. Knoll's New York Stock Exchange offering at $15 a share marked its third debut as an IPO and a second chance for Warburg Pincus Private Ventures, its major shareholder, to cash out. The net proceeds of $154.1 million, for 24 percent of the company, went largely to Warburg Pincus investors, who held 91 percent of the company before the IPO. David Bright, a spokesman for Knoll, would not comment, citing securities rules.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1996 | By Kevin Stirling, FOR THE INQUIRER
After nearly 25 years, company man Paul Reilly listened to his heart, took his mother's advice, and used a buyout offer to chisel a new life for himself. He tells senior executives where they belong - surrounded by exquisite handcrafted office furniture. Like the mythical phoenix that rises from its ashes to begin again, Reilly found himself in the rubble of a restructuring, retooled his career, and is flying high as the key salesman for a group of master craftsmen and women who design and build fine office furniture.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Gerald B. Shreiber, 74, founded and leads a company that sells nearly $1 billion worth of snack foods a year - soft pretzels, water ice, slushy drinks, and churros. Just down the hall from his office at the Pennsauken headquarters of J&J Snack Foods Corp., tens of thousands of soft pretzels move from dough to twisted on an aromatic assembly line. So what's on his desk? A small container of almonds - less than half a cup - carefully doled out by his assistant. We just interviewed Campbell Soup's CEO last week, and she stressed the growing importance of healthy options in her business.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Late last year, Lynn Utter found herself in a tough spot. As she was mulling over a decision to resign from her job as president and chief operating officer of Knoll Inc., the East Greenville office furniture design and manufacturing company, she learned she had been selected to receive the Paradigm Award, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's prize honoring female business leaders. "I felt badly," said Utter, 53, adding that she had wondered whether "I dare make this move now or should I wait until after March?"
NEWS
August 20, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / KENDALL WILKINSON
WITH ROWS OF SURPLUS CHAIRS as a backdrop, Norma Davall shows off the 1976 Mercedes 450SL to be auctioned off by the General Services Administration. The sale of 85 lots of used property will start at 10 a.m. today at the Federal Personal Property Exchange, 15th Street and Washington Avenue. Among the items for sale are office furniture, medical equipment and electronic equipment. The Mercedes was confiscated by the Drug Enforcement Administration.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gordon Austin, 70, retired owner of a furniture business, died Sunday at his home in Southampton. Mr. Austin lived in Churchville for 26 years before moving to Southampton five months ago. Born in Detroit, Mr. Austin was raised and educated in New York City. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Corps as a communications specialist in Brazil. Mr. Austin had worked in office furniture for many years and was a vice president of Metalstand Co. in Northeast Philadelphia when, in 1989, he and a partner founded A/S Custom Furniture Co. The Huntingdon Valley firm manufactures custom office furniture and related equipment.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Stephanie Franklin-Suber said last week that she would step down in September as Mayor Street's chief of staff. She acknowledged repeatedly that in her six months on the job, she has became a conduit for controversy in the new administration. Her management style and two messy firings have been a constant source of political flare-ups. Critics complained of micromanagement. And earlier this month, Street publicly upbraided Franklin-Suber for spending $30,000 of taxpayer money on custom office furniture.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Valerie Russ and Daily News Staff Writer
As they unveiled the new offices of the Daily News, Inquirer and Philly.com Thursday, company officials spoke of the strong tradition of journalistic excellence that took place at the old white tower building on North Broad Street, but said that they look forward to continuing that tradition at "our new home. "   Chief Executive and Publisher Bob Hall said that the new home is a state-of-the-art facility for multimedia projects and that staffers will deliver the news in print, online, or by video to people "when they want it and how they want to get it. " Interstate General Media is the parent company of the two newspapers, SportsWeek and Philly.com, which now operate in 125,000 square feet of space on the third floor at 801 Market St. The building was once home to the Strawbridge & Clothier department store.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the recent annals of modern office-dom, first came the cube farms: nightmarish rows of high-paneled cages where office workers labored in lonely silence, noses buried in their computers. Then came the antithesis: All those bright spirits flitting about with laptops, plugging in anywhere, turbocharged on Starbucks lattes. "The mobile workforce was very in vogue," said Lynn Utter, sitting in a museum of office furniture located among cow pastures and farms in rural East Greenville, Montgomery County.
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BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Gerald B. Shreiber, 74, founded and leads a company that sells nearly $1 billion worth of snack foods a year - soft pretzels, water ice, slushy drinks, and churros. Just down the hall from his office at the Pennsauken headquarters of J&J Snack Foods Corp., tens of thousands of soft pretzels move from dough to twisted on an aromatic assembly line. So what's on his desk? A small container of almonds - less than half a cup - carefully doled out by his assistant. We just interviewed Campbell Soup's CEO last week, and she stressed the growing importance of healthy options in her business.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Late last year, Lynn Utter found herself in a tough spot. As she was mulling over a decision to resign from her job as president and chief operating officer of Knoll Inc., the East Greenville office furniture design and manufacturing company, she learned she had been selected to receive the Paradigm Award, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's prize honoring female business leaders. "I felt badly," said Utter, 53, adding that she had wondered whether "I dare make this move now or should I wait until after March?"
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Claude B. Kershner Jr., 86, formerly of Bala Cynwyd, longtime owner-operator of an office products firm, died Tuesday, Jan. 6, of heart failure at his home in Audubon, Montgomery County. Mr. Kershner was not one to waste time. In 1952, he went on a blind date with Mary Ellen McCormick. By 1962, the couple, now married, had produced eight children. After a stint as a salesman in 1960, Mr. Kershner bought a small retail stationery store in Upper Darby with three employees. With his family's assistance, he built C.B. Kershner Inc. in Manayunk into one of the largest office products firms in the region.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
ANDRE BOYER says the Philadelphia Police Department did him wrong, over and over again. After 17 years on the force, he was kicked to the curb in August by Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey at the recommendation of the Police Board of Inquiry. The internal disciplinary board cited Boyer for a handful of departmental violations over the allegedly questionable way that he seized $6,000 in cash from a man during a 2011 arrest. A few months before he was fired, Boyer saw the District Attorney's Office and others publicly question his credibility in an Inquirer article about a 2008 Internal Affairs investigation into dozens of arrest reports that he had allegedly filled out improperly.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - When the Office of Open Records was created by Pennsylvania's landmark 2008 Right-to-Know Law, there was no precedent for how an independent agency would handle citizen appeals for government documents. There weren't even a logo or office furniture. Now, five years and more than 6,000 cases after the appointment of its first director, the office confronts new challenges: handling nearly double the caseload from when its doors opened in 2009, and dueling with government agencies that keep finding reasons to turn down citizens' requests.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - A pair of Democrats won the top elected fiscal-watchdog posts in Pennsylvania government Tuesday. Rob McCord was reelected to a second four-year term as state treasurer, and legislator Eugene DePasquale won a three-way race for auditor general. McCord, 53, defeated Diana Irey Vaughan, 50, a Washington County commissioner since 1995, in her first statewide campaign. McCord is a former venture capitalist from Bryn Mawr. He was elected in 2008 in his first political run. Though he has maintained a low profile, McCord made headlines in 2010 when he and Auditor General Jack Wagner refused to approve a $1 billion borrowing package advocated by Gov. Ed Rendell.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Valerie Russ and Daily News Staff Writer
As they unveiled the new offices of the Daily News, Inquirer and Philly.com Thursday, company officials spoke of the strong tradition of journalistic excellence that took place at the old white tower building on North Broad Street, but said that they look forward to continuing that tradition at "our new home. "   Chief Executive and Publisher Bob Hall said that the new home is a state-of-the-art facility for multimedia projects and that staffers will deliver the news in print, online, or by video to people "when they want it and how they want to get it. " Interstate General Media is the parent company of the two newspapers, SportsWeek and Philly.com, which now operate in 125,000 square feet of space on the third floor at 801 Market St. The building was once home to the Strawbridge & Clothier department store.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
As keenly as Mad Men has been missed during its 17-month intermission, it's not until you hear the vertiginous strains of the opening theme that you really grasp what an important part of the TV landscape this Emmy-monopolizing show has become. In other words, welcome back, Don Draper, you handsome devil. Questions, questions, you've got questions. The Season Four finale left a lot of pimple balls up in the air. Would Don (Jon Hamm) repent of his impetuous marriage to his secretary, Megan (Jessica Paré)
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis Applebaum, 75, of Langhorne, a business owner who was procurement commissioner for the City of Philadelphia for 10 years, died of lymphoma Friday, Jan. 13, at home. In 1991, newly elected Mayor Ed Rendell asked Mr. Applebaum for a one-year commitment to public service as procurement commissioner. Mr. Applebaum, who had recently retired as head of a furniture and office-supply company, agreed to take the job. The one-year commitment turned into 10 years, covering Rendell's eight years in office and two years of John F. Street's administration.
SPORTS
December 25, 2011 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
Jason Babin is locked and loaded, flattened out in that quirky sprinter's crouch, a helmet-tipped missile ready for launch. He appears to be positioned roughly two zip codes away from the ball, almost as though he is playing in another game, but then that is the very crux of the wide nine, the controversial defensive alignment that is, depending on your viewpoint, a stroke of blinding genius or of sheer idiocy. What it has done is help transform a heretofore ordinary player into a quarterback-inhaling beast.
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