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Office Manager

NEWS
May 28, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Jonathan Ramos, who challenged state Rep. Angel Cruz in last week's Democratic primary for his 180th District seat, is asking for an investigation into Cruz's Election Day behavior. "I'm not looking for a recount," Ramos said at a news conference, surrounded by more than 30 supporters. "It's not about me anymore. I just want this injustice to end for the community. " Common Pleas Judge Dennis P. Cohen issued an injunction against Cruz on Election Day for allegedly intimidating voters and blocking some election workers' access to polling places.
NEWS
April 8, 2010 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Galioto, 41, director of City Councilman Frank Rizzo's constituent services operation, died of an apparent heart attack Tuesday, April 6, while visiting his parents in Florida. Council staffers were in shock at the news that the well-liked colleague, known for his self-deprecating humor and dedication to this work, was gone. "He was so good at helping people, and it wasn't a job - he loved doing it," Rizzo said Wednesday. Susan Conboy, who worked with Mr. Galioto in Rizzo's office from 1999 to 2004, had nicknamed him "The Scam Spotter" because he could sniff out a scammer from a mile away.
NEWS
April 5, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda Seeligsohn Rice, 68, of Devon, a founding member, former office manager, and past president of Temple Brith Achim in King of Prussia, died Thursday, April 1, of breast cancer at Bryn Mawr Terrace. In 1970, Mrs. Rice and her husband, Howard, were among the young couples who decided to establish a reform synagogue in the Valley Forge area. "There were about 22 of us, and we either had no children or had just started having children," Mrs. Rice told an Inquirer reporter in 1994.
NEWS
January 23, 2010 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An ACORN Housing Corp. employee has launched a suit against a pair of independent filmmakers who secretly recorded a meeting with her while they posed as a pimp and prostitute. Katherine Conway-Russell, office manager at ACORN's Philadelphia branch, claimed that James O'Keefe and Hannah Giles attempted to entrap her into giving "inappropriate counseling" while violating Pennsylvania wiretapping laws. The civil suit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia because it involves parties from different states, seeks at least $75,000 in damages for causing "emotional distress, harm and injury to plaintiff.
NEWS
December 30, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A West Chester couple and their office manager pleaded guilty yesterday in federal court in Philadelphia to fraudulently obtaining hundreds of temporary-worker visas for illegal immigrants from Mexico and Central and South America. Michael Glah, 48, his wife, Theresa Klish, 50, and Mary Gillin, 60, acknowledged under questioning by U.S. District Judge Berle Schiller that between 2003 and 2008 they used names drawn randomly from a Mexican telephone book on falsified visa applications.
NEWS
December 13, 2009 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than halfway through her prison sentence, Bonnie Sweeten wants out. The suburban mother of three, who in May faked her abduction and fled to Disney World with her 9-year-old daughter, will ask a Bucks County judge this week to transfer her to house arrest. Saddled with nine to 24 months for the widely publicized hoax, Sweeten is contrite and will never transgress again, her lawyer says. Even so, new allegations about Sweeten keep turning up in public records. The onetime paralegal is accused of getting her former boss' law license suspended, masquerading as a lawyer, stealing six-figure sums from clients, defrauding a lender, and using forgery and a fake passport to pose as her employer at a mortgage closing, according to documents filed in civil lawsuits and state disciplinary proceedings.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood and Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In a potentially major blow to New Jersey's eroding beaches, the Army Corps of Engineers' beach-fill budget is taking a hit from the White House. While the Office of Management and Budget approved $4.6 billion for all corps projects under the economic-stimulus package, it deleted funding for sand-pumping operations in fiscal 2010, which will begin Oct. 1. "It's very disappointing," said Rep. Frank Pallone (D., N.J.), but he added he still hoped that some beach-fill money could be added to the final budget, which is expected in May. The beach program has long been a point of contention between environmentalists and beach interests.
NEWS
January 31, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roots of William Buckman's distrust of police can be traced to 1971, when he was arrested in Washington with hundreds of other college students while protesting the presence of U.S. troops in Cambodia. Buckman, a Northeast Philadelphia native who was studying sociology at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, remembers standing in a cramped jail cell for three days and being offered only a bologna sandwich. "The police surrounded a group of us marchers in an intersection and announced, if we didn't disperse, they would arrest us," said Buckman, who now lives in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
December 20, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John W. McCarthy, 66, of Mayfair, a retired office manager and antiques dealer, died of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Wednesday at Frankford Hospital-Torresdale Campus. Mr. McCarthy grew up in Feltonville. After graduating from Cardinal Dougherty High School, he worked as a clerk for the Social Security Administration in Philadelphia. He retired as office manager of the mid-Atlantic regional office of Social Security in 2001. Since 1968, he had been married to Renee Winkler. The couple met in Margate, N.J. When their son was growing up, Mr. McCarthy coached soccer, baseball and basketball for the Holy Terrors Youth Organization in Mayfair.
NEWS
December 6, 2008 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gussella W. Gelzer, 86, of Mount Airy, who as legal secretary to two prominent Philadelphia judges helped break a color barrier, died Tuesday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of complications from a stroke. "She was a pioneer," said attorney Richard H. Knox, a friend of 50 years who met her when he became a clerk for Common Pleas Court Judge Raymond Pace Alexander, for whom Mrs. Gelzer worked. Knox recalled that at the time, African American legal secretaries were a rarity.
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