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Office Park

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NEWS
September 2, 1995 | By John K. Hunka
The view from Temple University's train station at 10th and Berks Streets isn't pretty. Debris-strewn lots, gutted factories and decaying rowhouses stretch to the horizon. But, with a little time, imagination and public investment, this dismal prospect could be transformed into a thing of beauty - a landscaped, suburban-style office park. Since the end of World War II, countless businesses have fled the inner city and moved to the suburbs. However, after years of rapid development, the suburbs are choking on their own success.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Dallas developer yesterday announced plans to build an industrial and office park on 382 acres next to the Pureland Industrial Complex in Gloucester County. The Prentiss/Copley Investment Group said it would build 4 million square feet of office and industrial space at the intersection of Interstate 295 and Route 322 near the Commodore Barry Bridge. The complex, to be called the Commodore 295 Business Center, also is to include a 300-room hotel. Prentiss/Copley said it would begin construction in the fall with 3.4 million square feet of industrial space designed for use in distribution, light-manufacturing and warehouse operations.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
A subcommittee of the Gloucester County Planning Board withheld final approval last week of plans for an office park that would be built on Chapel Heights Road in Washington Township. The Chapel Hill Office Park, proposed by township residents Edna and Anthony "Butch" D'Alessandro and Virginia and Philip Sheridan, would be built on a 12-acre tract alongside the Newtown Commons condominium development and in front of existing homes in the Birches West development. The office park would have frontage on Chapel Heights Road next to the township's public library.
NEWS
September 17, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Several members of the township Planning Board have suggested less density and no freestanding buildings for the proposed Toll Bros. development planned for the township's east end. On Thursday night, Planning Board members listened to testimony from representatives of Toll Bros. on the proposed 150-unit, age-restricted townhouse community as well as the office park. At one point, Township Manager Jack Terry asked whether Toll Bros. would be willing to decrease the density of the 150-unit townhouse complex.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The developer of the Willistown Woods townhouse development in the Route 3 corridor of Willistown Township has presented the township planning commission with a sketch plan for a five-building professional office park. Stewart Lundy, attorney for developer Edward Weingartner, presented a sketch plan to the Willistown Planning Commission on March 19. The plan calls for five three-story buildings totaling 351,500 square feet on a 42-acre tract on the northwest side of West Chester Pike and Garrett Mill Road.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
Brian Belcher isn't the least bit concerned about keeping 800,000 square feet of office space occupied at the Horsham Business Center. He simply wants to make sure the kids are all right. To meet that demand, the Nichols Co. is breaking ground this month for a day-care center at the office park at Dresher and Welsh Roads. In a growing suburban commercial real-estate market, Belcher, the executive vice-president of Nichols, and other real-estate officials say attractive office space is the big lure to businesses - but not the only one. "We'll rent the space regardless," said Belcher of the business campus, which has two-thirds the floor space of Philadelphia's One Liberty Place.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The tired Inn at Plymouth Meeting will be put to rest soon. The inn, near the Pennsylvania Turnpike, will be razed and replaced with a 210,000-square-foot, six-story office park with a four-story parking garage developed by Philadelphia-based Flynn Co. Though plans to build on the site have been in the works for more than a year, the Township Council just granted land-development approval Monday. The question now, said Flynn Co. president Kevin D. Flynn, is "when do we start to build it. " Flynn said his company, along with venture partner Brandywine Realty Trust of Newtown Square, would meet today to discuss a timetable for the project, which should take a year to build.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
Camden County College officials are putting together a proposal for developing 23 acres of the college's land in Blackwood for a "business incubator" and an office or industrial park. At a board of trustees meeting Tuesday night, college president Robert Ramsay and Michael Giangiordano, director of the Camden County Economic Development Department, discussed the possibility of leasing to a private developer the land on the east side of Little Gloucester Road next to the campus.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1987 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plymouth Meeting is soon to be blessed with a sure-fire catalyst for commercial real estate development, a major highway interchange. The Blue Route, or Interstate 476, which will run from Interstate 95 in southern Delaware County to the Pennsylvania Turnpike near Plymouth Meeting, is scheduled to be completed in late 1990. When the eagerly awaited highway opens, Hansen Properties will be ready. Yesterday, the Horsham-based development firm announced plans for a $150 million office park, the most ambitious development yet slated for Plymouth Meeting.
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NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When they showed up at the happy hour, they weren't wearing their office clothes, but sweats and tights. Nor were they drinking lagers and downing wings. Instead, they were contorting themselves, becoming at turns a Downward Facing Dog or a Half Lord of the Fishes. The 90 or so had gathered at 5:15 p.m. Tuesday at a nondescript office complex in King of Prussia for a "Yoga Happy Hour," a twist, bend, and stretch on a long-standing American tradition. The summertime yoga class and networking social draws scores of frazzled office workers, who change from business casual to sweat-friendly and stretch for 45 minutes on an office building patio in Upper Merion Township.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under gray skies and drenching rains Thursday morning, construction crews in Camden started to tear away at the facade of the former Sears, Roebuck & Co. store, almost two months after demolition started June 5. While much of the rear of the structure on the Admiral Wilson Boulevard now lies in a pile of bricks and steel, the front facade and the side facing Memorial Avenue remained largely intact until Thursday. About 9 a.m., workers from Winzinger Inc. of Hainesport slowly began taking out large chunks of the top of the facade, transforming the front of the building into a skeleton of steel girders.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
The landmarks Camden has lost or tossed away could fill a hall of shame. They include long-gone but still-beloved buildings like the Stanley Theater, the Walt Whitman Hotel, and the Broadway Methodist Church, a list to which the shuttered Sears store on Admiral Wilson Boulevard soon will be added. Let's point out that the disappearance of any single structure in Camden has been far less damaging to the city's viability than the wholesale clearance of blocks along Broadway, Mickle, Federal, and Market between the Delaware River and 10th Street.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
In a perfect world, Camden's historically significant Sears Building, which 85 years ago began welcoming motorists from Philadelphia into the smaller industrial city, would have new life in the 21st century.   But perfection rarely applies to anything, and certainly to very little in New Jersey's poorest city, which, since Sears moved its premier store to Moorestown in 1971, has mostly tried to survive on a steady diet of decline. With that in mind, it's no wonder that Camden Mayor Dana Redd labeled Monday's announcement that the Sears Building would be razed as "great news.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Sears building that has been vacant for years on Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden was sold Monday to Campbell Soup Co. for $3.5 million after years of litigation. The former department store will be razed to make room for a 13-acre office park, which Campbell spokesman Anthony Sanzio said would ideally house professional firms and new businesses in the financially struggling city. "It's a win for us, a win for the city, and hopefully a win" for former owner Ilan Zaken, Sanzio said.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials in Burlington County remained on alert Saturday after a Shamong Township resident reported seeing a bear eating from her bird feeder. The bear, which was spotted in the Oakview trailer park, had retreated to the nearby woods by the time police responded. A New Jersey state police official said that although the bear did not threaten anyone, park rangers and officials from the state Department of Environmental Protection remain on alert. The day before, police shot a bear with a tranquilizer gun at an office park in the northern part of the state, where the animals are more frequently found.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last summer, hundreds of residents filled meeting halls in Horsham to say what they didn't want built on the site of the now-shuttered Willow Grove Naval Air Station: a commercial airport. But as area planners met Wednesday to approve a final proposal to fill the nearly 900-acre hole in the heart of their community, precious few looked on. "Now we have a plan to move forward," W. William Whiteside III, chairman of the Horsham Land Reuse Authority, told about 30 people.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan by Camden and Campbell Soup Co. to acquire and likely demolish the Sears building on the Admiral Wilson Boulevard may proceed, according to a state appeals court decision Monday. But the nearly five-year delay in resolving lawsuits by Ilan Zaken, who bought the once-regal structure in 2006, and Camden activist Frank Fulbrook has Campbell and the city wondering how to proceed with the redevelopment plan. "We'll have to evaluate all our options," Campbell spokesman Anthony Sanzio said.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Washington Township police officer has been charged in a hit-and-run accident last month that left a Camden County man in a coma. Kelly Gunderson, 33, of Gloucester Township, turned herself in to state police Friday and was released after surrendering her driver's license. She is accused of striking Vance Banks, 27, of Winslow, with her personal car around 1 a.m. Aug. 18, then fleeing. Banks was walking along Sicklerville Road in Winslow on his way home from his job as a security guard at an office park in Gloucester Township.
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