CollectionsOffice Space
IN THE NEWS

Office Space

NEWS
December 6, 1989 | By Sandra Stevens Chacon, Special to The Inquirer
Pemberton Borough's municipal offices are in an old bank, built in 1907, with five rooms - including the bathroom - on Hanover Street, the town's main street. Although the borough is small, with fewer than 1,200 people, the municipal building does not have enough space for many of the employees to store their files, much less to sit down and work. And there are problems other than space. According to Mayor F. Lyman Simpkins, the state is requiring that all court systems be on a state computer system by 1992.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the survival-of-the-fittest, cutthroat world of retail, some malls have the right stuff. Others simply need to be "right-sized" and reincarnated - like, say, neighborhood mall, meets City Hall, meets Main Street. Take the old Echelon Mall. Known as "The Mall" in its heyday in the late 1970s and '80s, it drew from surrounding communities, like Lindenwold, Clementon, and Audubon. But time, disrepair, an exodus of tenants, and newer competition took their toll. By the time mall powerhouse Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT)
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A study to determine whether more federal office space is needed in Philadelphia was authorized yesterday by the U.S. House Public Works and Transportation Committee, a spokesman for Rep. Robert A. Borski said. The measure directs the General Services Administration, which manages government buildings and property, to "investigate the feasibility and need for the construction or acquisition of federal buildings" in Philadelphia. Although the resolution gives no deadline for completing the study, a GSA official in Philadelphia said he expected the agency to complete the study within 60 days.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
ONE OF THE city's savviest money men says the city could save millions by trimming the fat from the more than 10 million square feet of office space the city owns and leases. Tom Knox, chairman of the Mayor's Task Force on City-owned Facilities, and Mayor Nutter yesterday presented the task force's report finding the city could save as much as $121 million over five years by better managing its unused office space. "This is real, serious money," Nutter said. "This report joins a growing body of work . . . that urges the city to become more data-driven and begin tracking all the costs of maintenance and operations facilities, citywide.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commercial office space is more difficult to find in Jenkintown than in any other area in the Philadelphia suburbs, according to a survey by an area real estate firm. As of June, Jenkintown had a vacancy rate of 7.6 percent, the lowest in a survey conducted by Helmsley-Greenfield in King of Prussia. The rate is 2.8 percent less than in December 1987. The borough overtook Bala Cynwyd as the area with the lowest vacancy rate in the suburbs because a 400,000-square-foot office building is under construction in Bala Cynwyd.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Bucks County District Attorney Alan Rubenstein has tripped over the last extension cord, squeezed through the last narrow walkway and inched past the last overcrowded workspace. Yesterday - after three years of complaining - Rubenstein sued to get more office space. His heavy-hitter attorney, Richard A. Sprague, filed the lawsuit yesterday in Bucks County Court, accusing County Commissioners Michael G. Fitzpatrick, Charles H. Martin and Sandra A. Miller of failing to provide adequate space in the DA's office.
NEWS
June 19, 2007 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, with office vacancies in the upper teens and rents plunging, some building owners predicted hard times if a new skyscraper came onto the downtown scene. One owner, David Campoli, contended in 2004, during the public debate over public subsidies for a proposed 57-story high-rise for Comcast Corp., that the "Center City market is very bad. . . . There are 184 full-floor vacancies. " From 2000 to 2004, the city lost about 33,000 jobs. But seemingly against the odds, Center City pulled a rubber-burning 180-degree turn.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Pasquale Real Estate of King of Prussia announces plans to build an additional 500,000 square feet of office space within the 220-acre Gulph Mills business park. In an attempt to enhance the image of Renaissance at Gulph Mills in the park, the new buildings will offer office space ranging from 23,000 to 31,000 square feet. According to Gene Tippens, vice president of sales administration for Pasquale, the building can accommodate tenants needing as little as 2,000 square feet. The business park is on Route 320 one mile north of the Gulph Mills interchange of the Schuylkill Expressway.
NEWS
February 13, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The amount of available suburban office space is becoming tighter for big corporate tenants, according to an annual year-end survey by CB Commercial Real Estate Group Inc. of Wayne. The survey showed that 4.31 million square feet, or 13.42 percent, of space was vacant at the end of 1994, versus the vacancy rate of 14.43 percent in December 1993. The survey included 520 office buildings, each with a minimum of 30,000 square feet, in 11 suburban areas. The market is getting tighter for two reasons, said Robert W. Walters, CB Commercial's executive vice president.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2006 | By Janet Pinkerton FOR THE INQUIRER
Laptop bag in hand, Gary McQuitty, 37, settled in at his favorite table at Chapterhouse Cafe & Gallery, in front, where the WiFi signal was strongest. The computer programmer has worked nearly full time in coffeehouses since he began freelancing in 2003 after his job at a small software company in Conshohocken was outsourced to India. He frequently meets clients at coffeehouses, and has gained new ones by talking to other customers. McQuitty has a home office, but says he would "go out of my mind being stuck in my basement, working by myself all the time.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|