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Ohio House

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NEWS
July 3, 2007 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by construction inside a climate-controlled room at Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall is a long-forgotten Philadelphia treasure: a three-dimensional "snapshot" of the Centennial Exposition as it looked on Independence Day in 1876. People who saw the model for the first time were astounded. In intricate detail, it depicts the nation's 100th-anniversary celebration in full swing, with Philadelphia at the epicenter, attracting millions from around the world. The model spans 20 by 40 feet, with buildings, trees and people all rendered in miniature.
NEWS
November 10, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Fairmount Park Commission gave the go-ahead yesterday to plans for the conversion of the historic Ohio House into a coffeehouse and ice cream parlor that would anchor the gradually developing Centennial District off Belmont Avenue. The Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust, an independent nonprofit designed to energize use of park buildings, presented the proposal at the commission's regular monthly meeting. Matthew Rader, trust executive director, told commissioners that restoration of the building, one of two major structures remaining from the 1876 Centennial Exhibition (the other is Memorial Hall)
FOOD
January 3, 2008
Thank you for smoking The most startling thing about the revival of Fairmount Park's long-neglected Ohio House is not that it has reopened as a cafe. It's that it seems bent on serving real food. The tip-off was the scent of brisket smoking in the morning, a juicy 12-pounder that had been brined for 16 hours, then smoked for most of a day and basted with a vinegary mop sauce. The final result is a tender chew of a sandwich, slathered with a brown-sugar-onion sauce reminiscent of Jewish-deli cabbage soup.
NEWS
June 30, 2008
AS I READ about the merger of Fairmount Park and the Department of Recreation, I thought it was time to talk about why many Philadelphians don't respect this unique and irreplaceable gem that other cities would kill to have. These 9,200 acres of green space are often litter-strewn despite countless hours of work from volunteers. Some sections, especially those in the east and west parts of the park, are bordered by unsafe neighborhoods like Parkside and Strawberry Mansion that, like the houses within them, are shells of their former glory.
NEWS
November 15, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It can get lonely sometimes around historic Ohio House. The wind comes sweeping across the plateau. The window frames can rattle. "It gets a little desolate when you're here by yourself," allowed Ian Simpkins, garden director for the Friends of the Japanese House and Garden, which uses the second floor of the landmark Fairmount Park building for office space. "Sometimes you feel like a squatter. " That hermitlike work life may be drawing to a close. The Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust, an independent nonprofit, has found a developer who wants to transform the first floor of Ohio House - at Belmont Avenue and Montgomery Drive - into a coffee shop and ice cream parlor.
NEWS
July 4, 2007 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surrounded by construction inside a climate-controlled room at Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall is a long-forgotten Philadelphia treasure: a three-dimensional "snapshot" of the Centennial Exposition as it looked on Independence Day in 1876. People who saw the model for the first time were astounded. In intricate detail, it depicts the nation's 100th-anniversary celebration in full swing, with Philadelphia at the epicenter, attracting millions from around the world. The model spans 20 by 40 feet, with buildings, trees and people all rendered in miniature.
FOOD
November 8, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Rush-hour commuters jockeying for position on Belmont Avenue last week might have missed the planting of a handsomely carved sign announcing the Centennial Cafe on the lawn outside Fairmount Park's forgotten Ohio House. Had they slowed down, they might have smelled the coffee - brewed La Colombe - or perhaps a toasting bagel. Developer David Groverman had leased the space, and was having a preview breakfast, showing off the work-in-progress that, a month from now, he wants to open as a dawn-to-dusk eatery, and later a venue for weddings and antiques fairs.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
FORMER SLAVE CELEBRATES 125TH BIRTHDAY AT MASS Former slave Maria do Carmo Geronimo, Brazil's oldest woman and unofficially the oldest person in the world, celebrated her 125th birthday yesterday with a Catholic Mass and chocolate cake. Geronimo still lives in Carmo de Minas, in Minas Gerais state, where she was born on March 5, 1871. She became a free citizen when Brazil abolished slavery in 1888. She's listed in the Brazilian edition of the Guinness Book of Records as the oldest woman in Brazil, but the international edition doesn't accept her baptismal certificate as authentic proof of age. Instead it recognizes Frenchwoman Jeanne Louise Calment, who celebrated her 121st birthday on Feb. 21, as the oldest person in the world.
NEWS
June 27, 1986 | By Melissa Weiner, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bill introduced yesterday by City Councilwoman Ann J. Land would rescue at least six of 55 neglected historic buildings in Fairmount Park, a top park administrator said. The bill proposes that "all fees and/or rents received as a result of the leasing of Fairmount Park property be deposited into a revolving fund established to restore and maintain the historic mansions and other facilities within the jurisdiction of the Fairmount Park Commission. " The fees now go into the city's general treasury.
NEWS
March 31, 2011
Brady speaks out on anniversary WASHINGTON - Jim Brady, President Ronald Reagan's smooth-talking press secretary, hasn't stopped speaking his mind, forcefully and poignantly. He made that clear Wednesday from the Capitol to the White House on the 30th anniversary of the assassination attempt that paralyzed him. "I wouldn't be here in this damn wheelchair if we had commonsense legislation," Brady, 70, said at a Capitol Hill news conference, joined by his wife, Sarah, and lawmakers in calling for gun-control legislation.
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NEWS
March 31, 2011
Brady speaks out on anniversary WASHINGTON - Jim Brady, President Ronald Reagan's smooth-talking press secretary, hasn't stopped speaking his mind, forcefully and poignantly. He made that clear Wednesday from the Capitol to the White House on the 30th anniversary of the assassination attempt that paralyzed him. "I wouldn't be here in this damn wheelchair if we had commonsense legislation," Brady, 70, said at a Capitol Hill news conference, joined by his wife, Sarah, and lawmakers in calling for gun-control legislation.
FOOD
July 15, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ricki Gever Eisenstein lived on Northwestern Avenue, just steps from a dilapidated Fairmount Park house for six years, knowing nothing of its history, until one day, at a relative's birthday party, she met Lucy Strackhouse. Strackhouse runs the Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust, which owns the building known as Cedars House. She told Eisenstein that the house was available for rent as a business. Eisenstein embraced the challenge of renovating the simple frame and stucco house in the charming woodsy setting, deciding to run it as a fitness cafe.
NEWS
June 30, 2008
AS I READ about the merger of Fairmount Park and the Department of Recreation, I thought it was time to talk about why many Philadelphians don't respect this unique and irreplaceable gem that other cities would kill to have. These 9,200 acres of green space are often litter-strewn despite countless hours of work from volunteers. Some sections, especially those in the east and west parts of the park, are bordered by unsafe neighborhoods like Parkside and Strawberry Mansion that, like the houses within them, are shells of their former glory.
FOOD
January 3, 2008
Thank you for smoking The most startling thing about the revival of Fairmount Park's long-neglected Ohio House is not that it has reopened as a cafe. It's that it seems bent on serving real food. The tip-off was the scent of brisket smoking in the morning, a juicy 12-pounder that had been brined for 16 hours, then smoked for most of a day and basted with a vinegary mop sauce. The final result is a tender chew of a sandwich, slathered with a brown-sugar-onion sauce reminiscent of Jewish-deli cabbage soup.
FOOD
November 8, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Rush-hour commuters jockeying for position on Belmont Avenue last week might have missed the planting of a handsomely carved sign announcing the Centennial Cafe on the lawn outside Fairmount Park's forgotten Ohio House. Had they slowed down, they might have smelled the coffee - brewed La Colombe - or perhaps a toasting bagel. Developer David Groverman had leased the space, and was having a preview breakfast, showing off the work-in-progress that, a month from now, he wants to open as a dawn-to-dusk eatery, and later a venue for weddings and antiques fairs.
NEWS
July 4, 2007 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surrounded by construction inside a climate-controlled room at Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall is a long-forgotten Philadelphia treasure: a three-dimensional "snapshot" of the Centennial Exposition as it looked on Independence Day in 1876. People who saw the model for the first time were astounded. In intricate detail, it depicts the nation's 100th-anniversary celebration in full swing, with Philadelphia at the epicenter, attracting millions from around the world. The model spans 20 by 40 feet, with buildings, trees and people all rendered in miniature.
NEWS
July 3, 2007 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by construction inside a climate-controlled room at Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall is a long-forgotten Philadelphia treasure: a three-dimensional "snapshot" of the Centennial Exposition as it looked on Independence Day in 1876. People who saw the model for the first time were astounded. In intricate detail, it depicts the nation's 100th-anniversary celebration in full swing, with Philadelphia at the epicenter, attracting millions from around the world. The model spans 20 by 40 feet, with buildings, trees and people all rendered in miniature.
NEWS
November 15, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It can get lonely sometimes around historic Ohio House. The wind comes sweeping across the plateau. The window frames can rattle. "It gets a little desolate when you're here by yourself," allowed Ian Simpkins, garden director for the Friends of the Japanese House and Garden, which uses the second floor of the landmark Fairmount Park building for office space. "Sometimes you feel like a squatter. " That hermitlike work life may be drawing to a close. The Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust, an independent nonprofit, has found a developer who wants to transform the first floor of Ohio House - at Belmont Avenue and Montgomery Drive - into a coffee shop and ice cream parlor.
NEWS
November 10, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Fairmount Park Commission gave the go-ahead yesterday to plans for the conversion of the historic Ohio House into a coffeehouse and ice cream parlor that would anchor the gradually developing Centennial District off Belmont Avenue. The Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust, an independent nonprofit designed to energize use of park buildings, presented the proposal at the commission's regular monthly meeting. Matthew Rader, trust executive director, told commissioners that restoration of the building, one of two major structures remaining from the 1876 Centennial Exhibition (the other is Memorial Hall)
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One hundred twenty-five years ago today, Philadelphia was the place to be. President Ulysses S. Grant came. So did the emperor of Brazil. Average citizens flocked to Philadelphia by train and steamboat, eager for a glimpse of the goings-on in Fairmount Park. The attraction was the Centennial Exhibition, a colossal world's fair in 1876 that stretched across 236 acres, where spectators got their first look at Alexander Graham Bell's invention, the telephone, saw the latest Singer sewing machine, and crawled inside the arm and torch of the yet-to-be-assembled Statue of Liberty.
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