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NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Renee Schoof, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Plans to burn hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil from BP's blown-out well are raising new questions about the health and safety of the thousands of workers on rigs and vessels near the spill site. BP and the federal government are in new territory once again in dealing with the nation's worst environmental disaster: There has never been such a huge flaring of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, or possibly anywhere. The incineration of such huge amounts of oil combined with the black clouds of smoke already wafting over the gulf waters from controlled burns of surface oil create pollution hazards for the estimated 2,000 people working in the area.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
An 84-year-old woman died at a Burlington County hospital Monday night two days after drinking tiki torch lamp oil that she had mistaken for apple juice. Four other people across New Jersey have gotten sick since May from accidentally drinking the amber liquid, prompting state officials to issue a health alert yesterday about the hazards of ingesting it. Officials have urged people to keep tiki torch fluid far away from foods and common areas to avoid confusion. "Lamp oil bottles closely resemble juice containers and the colors of those fluids is indistinguishable from juice," said Bruce Ruck, spokesman for the state Poison Information and Education System.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
GAS PRICES will never be what they used to be, we know that. Is it just coincidental that the fictional oil crunch just happens to coincide with the introduction of hybrid automobiles? If gas were so scarce, why hasn't SEPTA had a fare increase? Yet they were going to allow a strike over healthcare benefits, something they were already paying for. Darnell Perry Sr., Philadelphia
BUSINESS
March 2, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Energy Solutions and Aker Philadelphia Shipyard are practically neighbors in South Philadelphia, but they are worlds apart when it comes to a 1920 merchant-marine law known as the Jones Act. For the refinery, formerly owned by Sunoco, the federal law requiring that ships transporting cargo between two U.S. ports be built in the United States, staffed by U.S. crews, and primarily owned by U.S. citizens drives up the costs of shipping crude...
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | By Dave Barry
If you've been to a gas station lately, you have no doubt been shocked by the prices: $1.67, $1.78, even $1.92. And that's just for Hostess Twinkies. Gas prices are even worse. Americans are ticked off about this, and with good reason: Our rights are being violated! The First Amendment clearly states: "In addition to freedom of speech, Americans shall always have low gasoline prices, so they can drive around in 'sport utility' vehicles the size of minor planets. " And don't let any so-called "economists" try to tell you that foreigners pay more for gas than we do. Foreigners use metric gasoline, which is sold in foreign units called "kilometers," plus they are paying for it with foreign currencies such as the "franc," the "lira" and the "doubloon.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Sometimes it seems as if America, at 238 years old, is suffering from a sort of midlife crisis that has it questioning its strength and leadership. Questioning is fine; few are pleased with Washington these days. But it was more troubling to hear some critics suggest that President Obama should be more like Russian President Vladimir Putin. Some were apparently impressed by the machismo Putin displayed in invading Ukraine even though it was morally wrong. Much of that sentiment evaporated as casualties mounted in the war Putin incited to keep Ukraine firmly in Russia's orbit rather than the European Union's.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The drilling rig is coming to South Philadelphia. A contractor for the Sun Co. is expected to begin sinking test wells next week in the Passyunk Homes housing project to find out how far underground petroleum has spread from a nearby military supply base. The drilling will "bore far enough down to tell where the plume is likely to be," said Rob Goldberg, a spokesman for the Department of Environmental Protection. The immediate concern is the extent of contamination from the Defense Personnel Support Center, near the Schuylkill Expressway, rather than Sun's own property, where the company is cleaning up other plumes of oil. The base, Sun and the DEP have agreed on a need to pinpoint contamination in the area.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pour a few handfuls of chopped-up corn stalks or switchgrass into a hopper. Heat rapidly. Funnel the resulting mixture through an intricate network of metal pipes and canisters. Out the other end - drip, drip - comes a thick brown liquid that looks an awful lot like oil. Called bio oil, it is not quite the same as what comes out of a well. But it is close enough that government scientists think the process, called fast pyrolysis, is a promising way for farmers to enhance energy security.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
It could be an oil-producing nation on the Persian Gulf: Oil taxes generate nearly 85 percent of government revenues. In the boom years, it launched scores of expensive projects - schools, roads, hospitals - all across what was once a wasteland. Now, the boom has fizzled. Per-capita income is down, and thousands of skilled workers from elsewhere are packing up to go home. Or, it could be an oil-dependent Latin American debtor nation: It owes nearly $1 billion, almost all of it due in 10 years or less.
NEWS
May 22, 2001
To me, the Arctic refuge represents everything spectacular and everything endangered about America's natural heritage: a million years of ecological serenity . . . an irreplaceable sanctuary for polar bears, white wolves and 130,000 caribou.. . .For 20,000 years - literally hundreds of generations - the native Gwich'in people have inhabited this sacred place, following the caribou herd and leaving the awe-inspiring landscape just as they found it. . . . It is a sad day indeed when our President and congressional leaders would sacrifice America's largest wildlife refuge for the sake of a possible six-month supply of national energy.
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BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. of Philadelphia is expected to operate and own a 30 percent share of the Bakken Pipeline project, a 1,100-mile pipeline that will deliver about 470,000 barrels of crude oil a day from North Dakota shale fields. The project is jointly owned by Phillips 66 and Energy Transfer Partners L.P. (ETP), the parent company of Sunoco Logistics. When the pipeline is completed next year, it will connect North Dakota oil producers to Patoka, Ill., where the new pipeline will interconnect with ETP's existing Trunkline Pipeline that runs to the Gulf Coast.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wolf administration is hiring a railroad engineering expert for three months to advise on ways to prevent oil-train accidents. Allan M. Zarembski, a University of Delaware research professor and director of the university's railroad engineering and safety program, will study oil-train risk factors and make recommendations to improve operations in Pennsylvania, said Jeff Sheridan, spokesman for Wolf. "The governor wants to make sure we can prevent an oil-train disaster in Pennsylvania," Sheridan said.
NEWS
April 27, 2015
Divert the oil trains The challenge of choosing between a green city or an energy hub for Philadelphia shows who is calling the shots ("Earth Day challenge: Green city or energy hub?" April 22). The oil and gas lobby is alive and well. Unfortunately, too many politicians are only too happy to take the industry's donations and dance to its tune. We do not need more pipes or tanker cars bringing oil and gas to be processed here. The risk of air and water contamination is too great.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
About half the crude oil that now moves by rail in America is bound for Mid-Atlantic states, mostly refineries near Philadelphia, data from the U.S. Energy Department show. More than 33.7 million barrels of crude were shipped by rail in January, a fiftyfold increase from 630,000 barrels in January 2010, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). That tremendous growth in crude-by-rail shipments - which already has triggered safety concerns after a series of fiery oil-train derailments - has broader implications for regional transportation systems and foreign trade.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Senator Bob Casey (D., Pa.), reacting to growing anxiety over fiery railroad derailments of crude-oil tankers, on Monday pushed for legislation that could provide new resources and training to emergency personnel. "This legislation is a commonsense approach that could give our first responders more training and the additional resources they need," Casey said at a news conference in Philadelphia. The RESPONSE Act, written by U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), would establish a subcommittee under the Federal Emergency Management Agency's National Advisory Council to address training of first responders, particularly in smaller communities.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CITING THE GROWING number of railroad cars carrying crude oil through Philadelphia and the state, and a handful of recent derailments, Sen. Bob Casey yesterday called for the passage of federal legislation aimed at increasing railroad safety. Casey, joined at a City Hall news conference by City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, said that although the recent local derailments did not result in oil leakage or injuries, Congress should be proactive in preventing more serious accidents in the future.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council on Thursday urged the federal government to tighten regulations on trains carrying crude oil, in the aftermath of a series of fiery derailments. City Council unanimously approved a resolution that calls on Washington to approve new rules for railcars. It also calls for the city to plan emergency-response workshops for communities along oil-train routes. Philadelphia-area oil refineries have become increasingly dependent upon rail shipments of domestic crude oil, which has displaced more expensive imported oil delivered by ships.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Coast Guard is investigating an oil spill on the Delaware River near Pennsville, Salem County, N.J., authorities said Tuesday. Authorities were notified after globs of oil began washing ashore at the Pennsville boat ramp near Riviera Drive and Eaton Road. Police reports said there was a strong odor of oil. Neither the source of the oil nor the amount possibly spilled have been determined, said John Hammond, an operations specialist first class with the Coast Guard in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Energy Solutions and Aker Philadelphia Shipyard are practically neighbors in South Philadelphia, but they are worlds apart when it comes to a 1920 merchant-marine law known as the Jones Act. For the refinery, formerly owned by Sunoco, the federal law requiring that ships transporting cargo between two U.S. ports be built in the United States, staffed by U.S. crews, and primarily owned by U.S. citizens drives up the costs of shipping crude...
BUSINESS
March 1, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf on Friday joined a chorus of officials pressuring the federal government to improve oil-train safety, and urged the government to reduce the volatility of North Dakota crude oil, which has been implicated in several recent fiery accidents. The new governor released a letter he wrote to President Obama this week about the increasing rail volumes of crude oil, saying Pennsylvania has become one of the nation's biggest destinations for explosive North Dakota crude. Wolf estimated that 60 to 70 trains carrying North Dakota crude travel through Pennsylvania each week.
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