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NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Renee Schoof, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Plans to burn hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil from BP's blown-out well are raising new questions about the health and safety of the thousands of workers on rigs and vessels near the spill site. BP and the federal government are in new territory once again in dealing with the nation's worst environmental disaster: There has never been such a huge flaring of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, or possibly anywhere. The incineration of such huge amounts of oil combined with the black clouds of smoke already wafting over the gulf waters from controlled burns of surface oil create pollution hazards for the estimated 2,000 people working in the area.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
An 84-year-old woman died at a Burlington County hospital Monday night two days after drinking tiki torch lamp oil that she had mistaken for apple juice. Four other people across New Jersey have gotten sick since May from accidentally drinking the amber liquid, prompting state officials to issue a health alert yesterday about the hazards of ingesting it. Officials have urged people to keep tiki torch fluid far away from foods and common areas to avoid confusion. "Lamp oil bottles closely resemble juice containers and the colors of those fluids is indistinguishable from juice," said Bruce Ruck, spokesman for the state Poison Information and Education System.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
GAS PRICES will never be what they used to be, we know that. Is it just coincidental that the fictional oil crunch just happens to coincide with the introduction of hybrid automobiles? If gas were so scarce, why hasn't SEPTA had a fare increase? Yet they were going to allow a strike over healthcare benefits, something they were already paying for. Darnell Perry Sr., Philadelphia
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | By Dave Barry
If you've been to a gas station lately, you have no doubt been shocked by the prices: $1.67, $1.78, even $1.92. And that's just for Hostess Twinkies. Gas prices are even worse. Americans are ticked off about this, and with good reason: Our rights are being violated! The First Amendment clearly states: "In addition to freedom of speech, Americans shall always have low gasoline prices, so they can drive around in 'sport utility' vehicles the size of minor planets. " And don't let any so-called "economists" try to tell you that foreigners pay more for gas than we do. Foreigners use metric gasoline, which is sold in foreign units called "kilometers," plus they are paying for it with foreign currencies such as the "franc," the "lira" and the "doubloon.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Sometimes it seems as if America, at 238 years old, is suffering from a sort of midlife crisis that has it questioning its strength and leadership. Questioning is fine; few are pleased with Washington these days. But it was more troubling to hear some critics suggest that President Obama should be more like Russian President Vladimir Putin. Some were apparently impressed by the machismo Putin displayed in invading Ukraine even though it was morally wrong. Much of that sentiment evaporated as casualties mounted in the war Putin incited to keep Ukraine firmly in Russia's orbit rather than the European Union's.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The drilling rig is coming to South Philadelphia. A contractor for the Sun Co. is expected to begin sinking test wells next week in the Passyunk Homes housing project to find out how far underground petroleum has spread from a nearby military supply base. The drilling will "bore far enough down to tell where the plume is likely to be," said Rob Goldberg, a spokesman for the Department of Environmental Protection. The immediate concern is the extent of contamination from the Defense Personnel Support Center, near the Schuylkill Expressway, rather than Sun's own property, where the company is cleaning up other plumes of oil. The base, Sun and the DEP have agreed on a need to pinpoint contamination in the area.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pour a few handfuls of chopped-up corn stalks or switchgrass into a hopper. Heat rapidly. Funnel the resulting mixture through an intricate network of metal pipes and canisters. Out the other end - drip, drip - comes a thick brown liquid that looks an awful lot like oil. Called bio oil, it is not quite the same as what comes out of a well. But it is close enough that government scientists think the process, called fast pyrolysis, is a promising way for farmers to enhance energy security.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
It could be an oil-producing nation on the Persian Gulf: Oil taxes generate nearly 85 percent of government revenues. In the boom years, it launched scores of expensive projects - schools, roads, hospitals - all across what was once a wasteland. Now, the boom has fizzled. Per-capita income is down, and thousands of skilled workers from elsewhere are packing up to go home. Or, it could be an oil-dependent Latin American debtor nation: It owes nearly $1 billion, almost all of it due in 10 years or less.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Energy Solutions and Aker Philadelphia Shipyard are practically neighbors in South Philadelphia, but they are worlds apart when it comes to a 1920 merchant-marine law known as the Jones Act. For the refinery, formerly owned by Sunoco, the federal law requiring that ships transporting cargo between two U.S. ports be built in the United States, staffed by U.S. crews, and primarily owned by U.S. citizens drives up the costs of shipping crude...
NEWS
May 22, 2001
To me, the Arctic refuge represents everything spectacular and everything endangered about America's natural heritage: a million years of ecological serenity . . . an irreplaceable sanctuary for polar bears, white wolves and 130,000 caribou.. . .For 20,000 years - literally hundreds of generations - the native Gwich'in people have inhabited this sacred place, following the caribou herd and leaving the awe-inspiring landscape just as they found it. . . . It is a sad day indeed when our President and congressional leaders would sacrifice America's largest wildlife refuge for the sake of a possible six-month supply of national energy.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rail-safety expert recommended Monday that Pennsylvania step up track inspections and press railroads to increase the number of electronic trackside monitors to reduce the risk of oil-train derailments. Allan M. Zarembski, a University of Delaware expert commissioned by Gov. Wolf to explore responses to a massive increase in oil-train traffic, made 27 recommendations on ways the state and railroads can reduce the risk of a catastrophic derailment. Zarembski acknowledged that the state has limited leverage over federally regulated railroads, and that the U.S. Department of Transportation and the industry have already moved to upgrade safety standards, including new railcar rules.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lois Campana had just returned home from her shift as a night nurse. Her husband, Ralph, was getting dressed for a shift at Ladder 16. It was Aug. 17, 1975, and Ralph Campana already knew where he was heading: the Gulf Oil refinery in South Philadelphia, where a massive fire had been burning since before dawn. "Those people are going to blow themselves up one day," he told Lois. The refinery had already been the site of 10 multiple-alarm fires. He finished dressing, got in his car, and drove off as Lois waved from the front porch.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 1988 sale of the Rainbow Inn appeared to many a clean break. Theresa Maderich, a self-made businesswoman, was selling the Clayton liquor store and bar to pursue a new opportunity. Larry Dalton, a bartender from a well-known political family, eager to have his own business, saw potential in the former 19th-century hotel. Neither party anticipated a transaction that would be mired in controversy 27 years later. Neither suspected the trouble that an underground oil tank would present.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A BNSF train pulled out of a terminal in North Dakota's Bakken Shale region last month, hauling 106 tank cars filled with crude oil on a westward journey to a refinery near Ferndale, Wash. It didn't get far. Just 30 miles into its thousand-mile-plus trek to the Pacific Coast, the train derailed July 16 on a straightaway outside Culbertson, Mont. Twenty-two tank cars left the rails. Five were breached, BNSF says, spilling 35,000 gallons of Bakken crude. In the pile-up, a live power line was knocked down.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Railroad Administration on Wednesday reminded railroads transporting crude oil that they must notify state emergency response commissions of the expected movement of trains hauling Bakken crude oil through individual states. In May, the Obama administration had said it would let a 2014 notification rule lapse as part of new regulations on oil trains. Following a backlash from communities, states, and some in Congress, the administration said it would leave the notification rule in place.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lockheed Martin Corp. agreed Monday to buy helicopter maker Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. for $9 billion, and Lockheed's CEO said she sees "a real opportunity for growth" in Sikorsky's commercial division, which is based in Coatesville. "Sikorsky's footprint in the commercial aviation segment is well-established," Lockheed CEO Marillyn Hewson said Monday on a conference call with analysts. While the commercial business "has been under recent pressure due to low oil prices, it is expected to recover and add value," Hewson said.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years after a fatal oil-train derailment in Quebec drew national attention to the transport of crude oil, more than 100 people gathered Saturday in Center City to remember the victims and demand better train safety controls in Philadelphia. "These trains go through our neighborhoods and right past our most important icons, and right by a major water supply," said Tracy Carluccio, director of special projects at Delaware Riverkeeper Network, one of the groups that organized the rally at Schuylkill River Trails park, near tracks used by oil trains daily.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Rudolph Bilhuber, 87, of Media, an oil-company executive and a skilled sailor, died Tuesday, June 23, of kidney failure at his home. Mr. Bilhuber spent a long career with Mobil Oil Co., starting as a coordinator for service stations. He quickly excelled and became the engineering manager for the firm's eastern region. He was then appointed to a five-year assignment in Norway as a contracts manager for the construction of three huge oil-drilling platforms in the North Sea that were jointly owned by Norway and the United States.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
HEIMDAL, N.D. - Arden Georgeson, 78, thought the dark column rising skyward was a tornado. He shouted to his wife, Linda, 72, to run to the cellar. Then the Georgesons made out orange flames along the railroad tracks adjoining their farm, and the source of the smoke came into focus: A mile-long train transporting crude oil had derailed. The fiery wreck last month was the second in North Dakota since 2013, and the 10th in North America in two years, including five already in 2015.
NEWS
June 8, 2015
ISSUE | OIL TRAINS Safer routes The reality is that Bakken oil trains endanger thousands in the Delaware Valley, rail accidents are a daily reality, and federal regulations are too weak ("Good safety record, getting better," June 2). Better to transport oil by ship through the Great Lakes directly to refineries. Leaders in City Hall need to demand that no lives be imperiled so that Philadelphia can become an energy hub. |Michael Volpe, Philadelphia, mvolpe1@verizon.net ISSUE | CLIMATE Role for church Climate-altering pollution is leading to more deadly storms, drought, and famine - impacts disproportionately felt by the poorest in our communities ("Santorum says Pope Francis should butt out of climate debate," June 3)
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