IN THE NEWS

Oil

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Renee Schoof, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Plans to burn hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil from BP's blown-out well are raising new questions about the health and safety of the thousands of workers on rigs and vessels near the spill site. BP and the federal government are in new territory once again in dealing with the nation's worst environmental disaster: There has never been such a huge flaring of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, or possibly anywhere. The incineration of such huge amounts of oil combined with the black clouds of smoke already wafting over the gulf waters from controlled burns of surface oil create pollution hazards for the estimated 2,000 people working in the area.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
An 84-year-old woman died at a Burlington County hospital Monday night two days after drinking tiki torch lamp oil that she had mistaken for apple juice. Four other people across New Jersey have gotten sick since May from accidentally drinking the amber liquid, prompting state officials to issue a health alert yesterday about the hazards of ingesting it. Officials have urged people to keep tiki torch fluid far away from foods and common areas to avoid confusion. "Lamp oil bottles closely resemble juice containers and the colors of those fluids is indistinguishable from juice," said Bruce Ruck, spokesman for the state Poison Information and Education System.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
GAS PRICES will never be what they used to be, we know that. Is it just coincidental that the fictional oil crunch just happens to coincide with the introduction of hybrid automobiles? If gas were so scarce, why hasn't SEPTA had a fare increase? Yet they were going to allow a strike over healthcare benefits, something they were already paying for. Darnell Perry Sr., Philadelphia
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | By Dave Barry
If you've been to a gas station lately, you have no doubt been shocked by the prices: $1.67, $1.78, even $1.92. And that's just for Hostess Twinkies. Gas prices are even worse. Americans are ticked off about this, and with good reason: Our rights are being violated! The First Amendment clearly states: "In addition to freedom of speech, Americans shall always have low gasoline prices, so they can drive around in 'sport utility' vehicles the size of minor planets. " And don't let any so-called "economists" try to tell you that foreigners pay more for gas than we do. Foreigners use metric gasoline, which is sold in foreign units called "kilometers," plus they are paying for it with foreign currencies such as the "franc," the "lira" and the "doubloon.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The drilling rig is coming to South Philadelphia. A contractor for the Sun Co. is expected to begin sinking test wells next week in the Passyunk Homes housing project to find out how far underground petroleum has spread from a nearby military supply base. The drilling will "bore far enough down to tell where the plume is likely to be," said Rob Goldberg, a spokesman for the Department of Environmental Protection. The immediate concern is the extent of contamination from the Defense Personnel Support Center, near the Schuylkill Expressway, rather than Sun's own property, where the company is cleaning up other plumes of oil. The base, Sun and the DEP have agreed on a need to pinpoint contamination in the area.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pour a few handfuls of chopped-up corn stalks or switchgrass into a hopper. Heat rapidly. Funnel the resulting mixture through an intricate network of metal pipes and canisters. Out the other end - drip, drip - comes a thick brown liquid that looks an awful lot like oil. Called bio oil, it is not quite the same as what comes out of a well. But it is close enough that government scientists think the process, called fast pyrolysis, is a promising way for farmers to enhance energy security.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
It could be an oil-producing nation on the Persian Gulf: Oil taxes generate nearly 85 percent of government revenues. In the boom years, it launched scores of expensive projects - schools, roads, hospitals - all across what was once a wasteland. Now, the boom has fizzled. Per-capita income is down, and thousands of skilled workers from elsewhere are packing up to go home. Or, it could be an oil-dependent Latin American debtor nation: It owes nearly $1 billion, almost all of it due in 10 years or less.
NEWS
May 22, 2001
To me, the Arctic refuge represents everything spectacular and everything endangered about America's natural heritage: a million years of ecological serenity . . . an irreplaceable sanctuary for polar bears, white wolves and 130,000 caribou.. . .For 20,000 years - literally hundreds of generations - the native Gwich'in people have inhabited this sacred place, following the caribou herd and leaving the awe-inspiring landscape just as they found it. . . . It is a sad day indeed when our President and congressional leaders would sacrifice America's largest wildlife refuge for the sake of a possible six-month supply of national energy.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
That's what I like," said Slats Grobnik, with a snort and a snicker. "I like a guy who doesn't make any snap decisions. " Who are you talking about? "Who else? Our new leader, the commander in chief, the great horseshoe player, President Bush. " What has brought on your sudden admiration? "Well, I just heard he said the big oil leak in Alaska is the oil company's fault, but he's going to send in troops to help clean it up anyway. " I think that is a decision we can all agree on. "Right, and what I like is he just didn't rush in there with any whatchacallits.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
An underground plume of petroleum - for months a concern in South Philadelphia - reaches under part of the Passyunk Homes public housing project, recent tests have found. But as a nearby refinery and military base signed on for a cleanup, environmental officials said the oil 20 feet under the ground appeared to pose no immediate health threat to the project's 2,300 residents. A thick cover of earth blocks the escape of vapors, the Department of Environmental Protection said yesterday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 13, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airline stocks soared Thursday after Delta Air Lines said the sharp drop in oil prices would translate into a $1.7 billion savings in fuel costs next year. Delta said at an investor conference in New York that its Trainer refinery in Delaware County would produce a $75 million profit in the current quarter, helping to offset losses on the airline's fuel-hedge contracts. Delta buys some of its fuel in advance, to hedge against higher costs. But when fuel prices dramatically decline, the airline is locked in and takes a hedge loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In a swelling tide of tinsel and Bing Crosby, Hanukkah sometimes seems like a mesh bag of gold foil-wrapped afterthought. Yet the very theme of the Festival of Lights is survival, and the panoply of options for Hanukkah activities in the region demonstrates that this holiday refuses to go quietly into the fake snowy night. Here are some ways to keep the lights burning: Lighting ceremonies. Re-creating those flames that wouldn't quit, lighting ceremonies abound on the eve of the holiday on Tuesday - at sundown at Suburban Square, 6 Coulter Ave., Ardmore (information: 610-896-7560, suburbansquare.com)
BUSINESS
December 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airlines are enjoying record profits as oil prices drop and the global economy improves. So far, though, airlines have not passed on their profits to passengers in the form of lower airfares. But that may change. The fall in fuel prices and upturn in the economy could benefit consumers with cheaper travel, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) in Geneva said Wednesday. The trade group for the world's airlines predicted the average fare could drop 5.1 percent in 2015, excluding taxes and surcharges.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The early October sell-off created buying opportunities in the industrial sector for companies such as United Technologies (UTX), Eaton Corp. (ETN), and General Electric (GE), says Hank Smith at Haverford Trust, chief investment officer overseeing $6 billion in assets. In particular, he holds and has been buying more of UTX and Eaton since those shares fell roughly 20 percent. UTX has fallen to about $101 a share, Eaton to $60, Smith says. The bear market in crude oil also presents opportunity in major integrated oil companies ExxonMobil (XOM)
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P., the Philadelphia energy company, said that all recoverable crude oil has been removed after its Mid-Valley Pipeline ruptured and spilled on Oct. 13 in Northwest Louisiana. Sunoco spokesman Jeffrey P. Shields said the company recovered about 4,100 of an estimated 4,500 barrels of spilled oil. Some oil was unrecoverable due to evaporation and dispersion. About 20 workers will remain on site to monitor the area, he said. The spill polluted about four miles of a creek feeding Caddo Lake, and prompted the evacuation of three homes.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. says it has recovered 2,550 barrels of crude oil that spilled into a Louisiana bayou last week from its Mid-Valley Pipeline. The pipeline remains out of service indefinitely until repairs can be done. The Philadelphia company estimated last week that as much as 4,000 barrels - 168,000 gallons - spilled from a break in the underground pipeline. The Mid-Valley system, which transports crude oil from Texas to Midwestern refineries, terminates near Detroit.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania professor who studies psychopaths has found hope for improving human behavior in a surprising place: fish oil. A new study led by Adrian Raine, a psychologist in Penn's criminology department, found giving children a fruit drink mixed with omega-3 fatty acids - a key ingredient in fish oil - improved their behavior. Strangely, the behavior of parents also improved, even though they weren't taking the supplements. More on that later. Raine's ultimate goal is ambitious: to reduce crime.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Shorten Cross, 97, an oil-industry expert who helped lay the groundwork for the country's Strategic Petroleum Reserve during the energy crisis of the 1970s, died Thursday, Sept. 11, of causes related to aging at White Horse Village in Newtown Square. Dr. Cross lived in Merion starting in 1953, and 10 years later moved to Hunting Hollow Farm in Edgmont. He retired to White Horse Village in 2006. From 1953 until 1975, Dr. Cross served as chief economist and director of the Economics and Industry Affairs Department for Sun Oil Co. In 1968, he was appointed director of the Office of Statistical Services in the U.S. Department of the Interior's Emergency Petroleum and Gas Administration.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Wednesday that its Trainer oil refinery in Delaware County produced a $13 million profit in the second quarter. Delta, the first U.S. airline to report earnings, posted a second-quarter profit of $889 million, or $1.04 a share, that beat analysts' estimates, driven by strong passenger demand and higher revenue from corporate contracts. Revenue rose 9.4 percent to $10.6 billion. "We will post even better results in the third quarter, with a forecast operating margin of 15 percent to 17 percent," Delta chief executive officer Richard Anderson said on a conference call.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines' subsidiary Monroe Energy L.L.C. has signed a five-year agreement with a Texas-based company, Bridger L.L.C., to receive 65,000 barrels of domestic crude a day at its oil refinery in Trainer, Delaware County. The contract will supply about one-third of the crude refined daily at the former ConocoPhillips refinery, which Delta bought in 2012. The Trainer refinery supplies Delta's Northeast operations with jet fuel, the largest and most volatile expense for airlines.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|