IN THE NEWS

Oil

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Renee Schoof, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Plans to burn hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil from BP's blown-out well are raising new questions about the health and safety of the thousands of workers on rigs and vessels near the spill site. BP and the federal government are in new territory once again in dealing with the nation's worst environmental disaster: There has never been such a huge flaring of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, or possibly anywhere. The incineration of such huge amounts of oil combined with the black clouds of smoke already wafting over the gulf waters from controlled burns of surface oil create pollution hazards for the estimated 2,000 people working in the area.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
An 84-year-old woman died at a Burlington County hospital Monday night two days after drinking tiki torch lamp oil that she had mistaken for apple juice. Four other people across New Jersey have gotten sick since May from accidentally drinking the amber liquid, prompting state officials to issue a health alert yesterday about the hazards of ingesting it. Officials have urged people to keep tiki torch fluid far away from foods and common areas to avoid confusion. "Lamp oil bottles closely resemble juice containers and the colors of those fluids is indistinguishable from juice," said Bruce Ruck, spokesman for the state Poison Information and Education System.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
GAS PRICES will never be what they used to be, we know that. Is it just coincidental that the fictional oil crunch just happens to coincide with the introduction of hybrid automobiles? If gas were so scarce, why hasn't SEPTA had a fare increase? Yet they were going to allow a strike over healthcare benefits, something they were already paying for. Darnell Perry Sr., Philadelphia
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | By Dave Barry
If you've been to a gas station lately, you have no doubt been shocked by the prices: $1.67, $1.78, even $1.92. And that's just for Hostess Twinkies. Gas prices are even worse. Americans are ticked off about this, and with good reason: Our rights are being violated! The First Amendment clearly states: "In addition to freedom of speech, Americans shall always have low gasoline prices, so they can drive around in 'sport utility' vehicles the size of minor planets. " And don't let any so-called "economists" try to tell you that foreigners pay more for gas than we do. Foreigners use metric gasoline, which is sold in foreign units called "kilometers," plus they are paying for it with foreign currencies such as the "franc," the "lira" and the "doubloon.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The drilling rig is coming to South Philadelphia. A contractor for the Sun Co. is expected to begin sinking test wells next week in the Passyunk Homes housing project to find out how far underground petroleum has spread from a nearby military supply base. The drilling will "bore far enough down to tell where the plume is likely to be," said Rob Goldberg, a spokesman for the Department of Environmental Protection. The immediate concern is the extent of contamination from the Defense Personnel Support Center, near the Schuylkill Expressway, rather than Sun's own property, where the company is cleaning up other plumes of oil. The base, Sun and the DEP have agreed on a need to pinpoint contamination in the area.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pour a few handfuls of chopped-up corn stalks or switchgrass into a hopper. Heat rapidly. Funnel the resulting mixture through an intricate network of metal pipes and canisters. Out the other end - drip, drip - comes a thick brown liquid that looks an awful lot like oil. Called bio oil, it is not quite the same as what comes out of a well. But it is close enough that government scientists think the process, called fast pyrolysis, is a promising way for farmers to enhance energy security.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
It could be an oil-producing nation on the Persian Gulf: Oil taxes generate nearly 85 percent of government revenues. In the boom years, it launched scores of expensive projects - schools, roads, hospitals - all across what was once a wasteland. Now, the boom has fizzled. Per-capita income is down, and thousands of skilled workers from elsewhere are packing up to go home. Or, it could be an oil-dependent Latin American debtor nation: It owes nearly $1 billion, almost all of it due in 10 years or less.
NEWS
May 22, 2001
To me, the Arctic refuge represents everything spectacular and everything endangered about America's natural heritage: a million years of ecological serenity . . . an irreplaceable sanctuary for polar bears, white wolves and 130,000 caribou.. . .For 20,000 years - literally hundreds of generations - the native Gwich'in people have inhabited this sacred place, following the caribou herd and leaving the awe-inspiring landscape just as they found it. . . . It is a sad day indeed when our President and congressional leaders would sacrifice America's largest wildlife refuge for the sake of a possible six-month supply of national energy.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
That's what I like," said Slats Grobnik, with a snort and a snicker. "I like a guy who doesn't make any snap decisions. " Who are you talking about? "Who else? Our new leader, the commander in chief, the great horseshoe player, President Bush. " What has brought on your sudden admiration? "Well, I just heard he said the big oil leak in Alaska is the oil company's fault, but he's going to send in troops to help clean it up anyway. " I think that is a decision we can all agree on. "Right, and what I like is he just didn't rush in there with any whatchacallits.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
An underground plume of petroleum - for months a concern in South Philadelphia - reaches under part of the Passyunk Homes public housing project, recent tests have found. But as a nearby refinery and military base signed on for a cleanup, environmental officials said the oil 20 feet under the ground appeared to pose no immediate health threat to the project's 2,300 residents. A thick cover of earth blocks the escape of vapors, the Department of Environmental Protection said yesterday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sage Piszek heard that the first barrel of used cooking oil was full, he was puzzled. Already? Maybe rain had somehow seeped in. But when he checked, it was full ... of oil. That told Piszek that the project in South Philadelphia's Indonesian community, the first of its kind in the region, was working. On Tuesday, officials - including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's regional administrator - and community members gathered for a ceremonial pump-out of that first barrel.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., one of the state's most prolific Marcellus Shale natural gas producers, is giving $2.5 million to Lackawanna College in Scranton to boost its School of Petroleum and Natural Gas. The gift is the largest single private donation in the history of the two-year college. Lackawanna College established the school in 2009 in the Susquehanna County borough of New Milford, near the heart of Cabot's drilling activity. "Our partnership with Cabot enhances tremendously the ability of the School of Petroleum and Natural Gas to provide a world-class education designed to prepare a ready workforce that fits the needs of the multiple companies across the industry," Mark Volk, the college's president, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE MEMORY is as clear as day in Rabbi Arthur Waskow's mind. It was sometime in 2010, and he was at a beach, watching his young granddaughter frolic with seagulls along the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. His mind drifted to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and he wondered what kind of world his granddaughter would inherit, what kind of environmental disasters she'd witness. Waskow said that haunting thought inspired him to be a part of a multifaith crowd that gathered in Center City yesterday to protest the dangers of trains that carry crude oil through Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
EDDYSTONE A waterfront rail terminal in Eddystone, a small Delaware County borough, will soon become a major center for transporting crude oil to area refineries. While officials applaud the project as a boost to the local economy, they also point to the threat of a disaster in the state's growing oil-by-rail industry. "Make no mistake," said former U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon. "An incident involving rail transport of oil will occur in the commonwealth, and lives, including first responders' lives, and property will be put at risk.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new owners of the former NuStar Asphalt refinery in Paulsboro plan to upgrade the Gloucester County facility to take advantage of the growing cross-country shipments of crude oil by rail. Axeon Specialty Products L.L.C., the new name adopted this week by the San Antonio company that operates the refinery, says it intends to make "new, substantial investments" in its 70,000-barrel-a-day operation in Paulsboro, including new rail unloading facilities. The Paulsboro plant now can receive only a small number of railcars at one time, said Rod Pullen, a senior vice president at Axeon SP. The aim is to add more unloading capacity so that Axeon can order cost-efficient unit trains - 100-car trains that carry a single commodity to a single destination.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A key power plant on the Center City steam loop that supplies the area around Thomas Jefferson University Hospital ran perilously short of fuel oil last week, prompting state and local officials to help arrange a rescue. Veolia Energy officials said a new oil supplier failed to deliver fuel to its Edison Station plant at 908 Sansom St., which provides high-pressure steam to the eastern part of Veolia's district heating system. Michael Smedley, Veolia's regional vice president, said the system that serves dozens of city hospitals, universities, and Center City office towers was in no danger of losing heat.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A spill of about 1,000 gallons of crude oil into the Delaware River near Trainer, Delaware County, was largely cleaned up Tuesday, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection. The spill happened about 1 p.m. Monday when a pipe burst in the marine off-loading area at the Monroe Energy L.L.C. refinery, just south of the Commodore Barry Bridge. The majority of the oil is gone, said DEP spokeswoman Deborah Fries. "What is remaining is sheen. " She said the cold weather helped response workers do their job. Cold oil has a higher viscosity, which made it easier to collect and contain, she said.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Mike Austin knew it was bad when his cellphone buzzed after 12:30 a.m. Quickly, he scribbled notes and called a coworker: "Train derailment. Seven cars. It's on a bridge. I'm going to need help. " Then he hopped into his white Chevrolet Suburban and drove 21/2 hours from a sleepy Baltimore suburb toward Philadelphia, to which derailment experts from around the country were being summoned. Their task: Remove tens of thousands of gallons of crude oil and more than 1.8 million pounds of train cars from atop the Schuylkill Arsenal Bridge.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | BY JOHN M. CRISP
SO, I'M TALKING to a young truck driver. He's a kid, really, but old enough to have a bachelor's degree in something. He's postponed his career for a temporary but lucrative sojourn in the oil field. The Eagle Ford Shale, a major oil and gas play in south Texas, is thriving on improved fracking technologies that extract previously unavailable hydrocarbons and contribute significantly to our nation's production boom. Fracking requires truckloads of water and plenty of drivers to service the new wells that pop up across the landscape every week.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Monday derailment of a freight train carrying crude oil to the Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES) refinery has triggered a new round of alarm over petroleum shipments by rail, but has not affected operations at the South Philadelphia refinery. CSX Corp. crews began transferring oil and sand Tuesday from seven cars that derailed on a bridge spanning the Schuylkill in Grays Ferry. The cars were at the end of a 101-car train traveling from Chicago to Philadelphia, carrying crude oil from North Dakota.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|