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NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Renee Schoof, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Plans to burn hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil from BP's blown-out well are raising new questions about the health and safety of the thousands of workers on rigs and vessels near the spill site. BP and the federal government are in new territory once again in dealing with the nation's worst environmental disaster: There has never been such a huge flaring of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, or possibly anywhere. The incineration of such huge amounts of oil combined with the black clouds of smoke already wafting over the gulf waters from controlled burns of surface oil create pollution hazards for the estimated 2,000 people working in the area.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
An 84-year-old woman died at a Burlington County hospital Monday night two days after drinking tiki torch lamp oil that she had mistaken for apple juice. Four other people across New Jersey have gotten sick since May from accidentally drinking the amber liquid, prompting state officials to issue a health alert yesterday about the hazards of ingesting it. Officials have urged people to keep tiki torch fluid far away from foods and common areas to avoid confusion. "Lamp oil bottles closely resemble juice containers and the colors of those fluids is indistinguishable from juice," said Bruce Ruck, spokesman for the state Poison Information and Education System.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
GAS PRICES will never be what they used to be, we know that. Is it just coincidental that the fictional oil crunch just happens to coincide with the introduction of hybrid automobiles? If gas were so scarce, why hasn't SEPTA had a fare increase? Yet they were going to allow a strike over healthcare benefits, something they were already paying for. Darnell Perry Sr., Philadelphia
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | By Dave Barry
If you've been to a gas station lately, you have no doubt been shocked by the prices: $1.67, $1.78, even $1.92. And that's just for Hostess Twinkies. Gas prices are even worse. Americans are ticked off about this, and with good reason: Our rights are being violated! The First Amendment clearly states: "In addition to freedom of speech, Americans shall always have low gasoline prices, so they can drive around in 'sport utility' vehicles the size of minor planets. " And don't let any so-called "economists" try to tell you that foreigners pay more for gas than we do. Foreigners use metric gasoline, which is sold in foreign units called "kilometers," plus they are paying for it with foreign currencies such as the "franc," the "lira" and the "doubloon.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Sometimes it seems as if America, at 238 years old, is suffering from a sort of midlife crisis that has it questioning its strength and leadership. Questioning is fine; few are pleased with Washington these days. But it was more troubling to hear some critics suggest that President Obama should be more like Russian President Vladimir Putin. Some were apparently impressed by the machismo Putin displayed in invading Ukraine even though it was morally wrong. Much of that sentiment evaporated as casualties mounted in the war Putin incited to keep Ukraine firmly in Russia's orbit rather than the European Union's.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The drilling rig is coming to South Philadelphia. A contractor for the Sun Co. is expected to begin sinking test wells next week in the Passyunk Homes housing project to find out how far underground petroleum has spread from a nearby military supply base. The drilling will "bore far enough down to tell where the plume is likely to be," said Rob Goldberg, a spokesman for the Department of Environmental Protection. The immediate concern is the extent of contamination from the Defense Personnel Support Center, near the Schuylkill Expressway, rather than Sun's own property, where the company is cleaning up other plumes of oil. The base, Sun and the DEP have agreed on a need to pinpoint contamination in the area.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pour a few handfuls of chopped-up corn stalks or switchgrass into a hopper. Heat rapidly. Funnel the resulting mixture through an intricate network of metal pipes and canisters. Out the other end - drip, drip - comes a thick brown liquid that looks an awful lot like oil. Called bio oil, it is not quite the same as what comes out of a well. But it is close enough that government scientists think the process, called fast pyrolysis, is a promising way for farmers to enhance energy security.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
It could be an oil-producing nation on the Persian Gulf: Oil taxes generate nearly 85 percent of government revenues. In the boom years, it launched scores of expensive projects - schools, roads, hospitals - all across what was once a wasteland. Now, the boom has fizzled. Per-capita income is down, and thousands of skilled workers from elsewhere are packing up to go home. Or, it could be an oil-dependent Latin American debtor nation: It owes nearly $1 billion, almost all of it due in 10 years or less.
NEWS
May 22, 2001
To me, the Arctic refuge represents everything spectacular and everything endangered about America's natural heritage: a million years of ecological serenity . . . an irreplaceable sanctuary for polar bears, white wolves and 130,000 caribou.. . .For 20,000 years - literally hundreds of generations - the native Gwich'in people have inhabited this sacred place, following the caribou herd and leaving the awe-inspiring landscape just as they found it. . . . It is a sad day indeed when our President and congressional leaders would sacrifice America's largest wildlife refuge for the sake of a possible six-month supply of national energy.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
That's what I like," said Slats Grobnik, with a snort and a snicker. "I like a guy who doesn't make any snap decisions. " Who are you talking about? "Who else? Our new leader, the commander in chief, the great horseshoe player, President Bush. " What has brought on your sudden admiration? "Well, I just heard he said the big oil leak in Alaska is the oil company's fault, but he's going to send in troops to help clean it up anyway. " I think that is a decision we can all agree on. "Right, and what I like is he just didn't rush in there with any whatchacallits.
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NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Authorities on Tuesday identified the source of a diesel-fuel spill that leaked about 250 gallons of oil into the Schuylkill River. A portion of the Schuylkill River Trail remained closed Tuesday while crews continued the cleanup effort. The spill occurred when a sensor in an outdoor, covered generator on the 2400 block of Market Street malfunctioned, said Nick Ameen, a spokesman for the U.S. Coast Guard, the lead agency in the cleanup. The generator is owned by a company called CenturyLink, a communications and IT company, Ameen said.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
About 200 gallons of home heating oil spilled into the Schuylkill Monday morning, resulting in the closure of the river trail in Philadelphia between Market and Locust Streets, officials said. A total of 4,200 gallons of oil spilled sometime before 9:30 a.m. from a tank at 2400 Market St., crossing CSX property and the Schuylkill River Trail before partially draining into the river, officials said. The popular trail was closed in the area as the spill was assessed and then the cleanup began, the state Department of Environmental Protection reported.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2016 | By Grant Smith and Robert Tuttle, BLOOMBERG
Brent crude traded near a 12-year low in London, briefly dipping below $28 a barrel, as the lifting of international sanctions on Iran paves the way for increased supply amid a global glut. Futures fell 1.3 percent after earlier dropping as much as 4.4 percent in London to the lowest since November 2003. Iran is beginning efforts to boost output and exports by 500,000 barrels a day now that restrictions have ended, Amir Hossein Zamaninia, deputy oil minister for commerce and international affairs, said Sunday.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
Steve Yetiv is a professor of international relations at Old Dominion University and the author of "Myths of the Oil Boom: American National Security in a Global Energy Market" Oil prices have fallen dramatically to the mid-$30s on the New York Mercantile Exchange from more than $105 per barrel in 2014. Such extraordinarily low prices are affecting global stock markets, big oil exporters, and consumers worldwide. How can we explain this crash, and where are oil prices headed?
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Rep. Patrick Meehan, a Delaware County Republican, voted against a $1.1 trillion spending bill that cleared the House and Senate on Friday, warning that a key provision could hurt the oil refineries that employ thousands in the Philadelphia area. Meehan and Sen. Pat Toomey (R. Pa.) were the only lawmakers from the region who voted against the bipartisan package, a sweeping compromise that will keep the federal government running for the next fiscal year but also includes enough policy riders in its 2,009 pages to please and anger seemingly everyone.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central Pennsylvania energy company that aspires to become the "Amazon of energy" is expanding its presence in the Philadelphia area with the acquisition of a King of Prussia oil transporter. Shipley Energy, of York, a jack-of-all-trades fuel dealer that markets a broad range of energy products in 13 states, announced that it had acquired Gleba Inc., a bulk-petroleum trucking company that primarily delivers ethanol to fuel terminals for blending into finished gasoline. The price was not disclosed.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josh Garfield, 64, of Ardmore, a marketing executive and oil painter, died Wednesday, Nov. 4, of cancer at his home in Boca Raton, Fla. He and his family had just relocated to Florida after 26 years in Ardmore. Mr. Garfield was marketing director of Garfield Refining Co., a precious-metals business that has been in the Garfield family for three generations. He held the position for many years, working from an office in the 800 block of East Cayuga Street in Philadelphia. Born in the city and educated in Lower Merion and Boston, Mr. Garfield aspired to become an artist.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Washington Township man who caused an oil spill into a lake and creek last year while emptying his pool was sentenced Monday to five years of probation, contingent on his completing 150 hours of community service, the New Jersey Attorney General's Office said. John Caldwell, 48, pleaded guilty in May after authorities charged him in connection with the June 29, 2014, spill that unleashed several thousand gallons of oil into Spring Lake and Mantua Creek. Authorities said Caldwell, then a truck operator for an environmental services firm, used a vacuum truck to drain the water from his pool and dumped it in front of his home on Uranus Road.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New York Stock Exchange is threatening to delist the shares of embattled Radnor oil producer Penn Virginia Corp. for failing to maintain an average closing stock price of at least $1 for the last 30 consecutive trading days. Under NYSE rules, Penn Virginia will regain compliance if, on the last trading day of any calendar month in the next six months, its closing share price and its consecutive 30 trading-day average closing share price are at least $1 per share. Penn Virginia's shares have sunk in the last year along with the oil price; its 52-week price has ranged from $13.99 to 71 cents.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. oil boom has been a salvation for the Philadelphia area's embattled refineries, creating an abundant source of discounted petroleum that instantly improved their competitiveness. Those refiners now fear that a movement in Congress to lift a ban on exporting crude oil will erase their newfound market advantage. They worry that overseas refiners will gobble up U.S. crude and sell it back to Americans in the form of gasoline, diesel, and heating oil. "By lifting export restrictions and sending our crude overseas, we would be sending American jobs overseas, as well," Jeffrey Warmann, chief executive of Monroe Energy refinery in Trainer, testified at a Senate Energy Committee hearing in March.
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