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NEWS
June 18, 2010
By Dana Milbank Oil company executives are on the horns of a dilemma. Or, to be more specific, they are on the tusks of a dilemma. Congressional investigators looking into the Gulf of Mexico oil spill found that BP and three other oil companies had filed "oil spill safety response plans" for the Gulf that made reference to protecting walruses. The problem is that "there aren't any walruses in the Gulf of Mexico and there have not been for three million years," as Rep. Edward Markey (D., Mass.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | By DONELLA H. MEADOWS
After weeks of front-page publicity, it's time to put the wreckage of the Exxon Valdez in perspective. The amount of oil spilled was 240,000 barrels, enough to supply U.S. consumption for about 20 minutes. It was 1 percent of the 26 million barrels of oil normally spilled into the oceans each year - about one out of every thousand barrels produced. Half that amount comes from spills on land that wash into the sea. One-third comes from routine flushing of empty tankers.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1991 | By Julia C. Martinez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several oil companies tried, in a somewhat unusual move, to play the good guys last week by putting a temporary lid on prices. But it backfired. The companies stepped forward just hours into the Persian Gulf war and announced they would freeze wholesale gasoline prices. But scarcely a day later, embarrassed oil-company executives had to rescind the freeze. Crude-oil prices cascaded so quickly - plummeting last Thursday to their biggest one-day drop in history - that it became clear the freeze might do more harm than good.
NEWS
March 24, 2006
RE YOUR RECENT editorial on the Delaware River dredging proposal: The only childish behavior is on the part of Gov. Rendell. He is holding the tollpayers' money hostage until New Jersey agrees to an incomplete plan to dredge (most of the toll-paying public comes from New Jersey). There is no evidence that dredging will cause a significant increase in business. Should there be an increase, chances are that it would benefit the record-profit-making oil companies. Why don't they pay for it?
BUSINESS
January 14, 1990 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Home-heating oil prices are falling fast as the political heat rises on oil companies accused of gouging consumers during last month's cold snap. As of Friday, retail dealers in the Philadelphia area reported that prices had dropped to as low as $1.15 a gallon from the high of about $1.40 a gallon reached around New Year's Day. Prices in the area were around 85 cents a gallon in October. "I think it just goes to show you how artificial the whole thing was. It was fueled by profit-taking and speculation," said Patrick L. Allinger, Philadelphia director of Buyers Up, a consumers' oil-buying cooperative.
NEWS
December 28, 2005
Deepening the Delaware River is not a panacea, nor would it be a boon for our river, our ports or our region. For years, it has merely been a pork-barrel project that Pennsylvania politicians have used to obtain press coverage. The project is primarily intended to benefit the region's oil facilities. It would reduce the amount of oil they would need to off-load in the Delaware Bay, thereby reducing their overhead costs. It would not mean more jobs at the refineries or more oil, just lower costs and more profits for the oil companies - companies that aren't contributing a dime to the project.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | By Ken Moritsugu, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Tapping the nation's Strategic Petroleum Reserve was intended to help consumers avoid heating-oil shortages this winter, but it appears likely to help some big oil companies even more. President Clinton released oil from the reserve last month to boost stocks of heating oil. Now, several big petroleum companies are among those that stand to profit as a result of the release, a study indicates. The study by the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies concludes that winning bidders for the 30 million barrels of oil - including divisions of BP Amoco P.L.C.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) is suing officials in West Deptford, his hometown, alleging that they let two oil companies skirt an environmental cleanup law in exchange for money to buy two fire trucks. The lawsuit, filed in Superior Court in Gloucester County, argues that the mayor and township council "willfully ignored" a law designed to prevent companies from leaving a polluted site without first paying the state for environmental cleanup. In a June e-mail exchange, a lawyer for Sunoco pledged that the oil company would pay $1 million toward West Deptford's purchase of two fire engines if the township awarded it $13.9 million for a property tax settlement and withheld nothing for cleanup in accordance with the pending law, according to the lawsuit.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Officials of two oil companies with ties to Pennsylvania and this region said yesterday they are ready and willing to comply with an anticipated U.S. government order to close their operations in Libya. But spokesmen for Conoco, a subsidiary of Wilmington-based DuPont Chemical, and Marathon, which is owned by Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel, said they have not received official word from the federal government ordering them to leave Libya, despite press reports that they must leave by June 30. "We are monitoring the situation closely and we are willing to comply with whatever the law says,"explained Marathon spokesman Bill Ryder.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1997 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sun Co. Inc., in an effort to shore up its sagging profits, has put its 16-vessel oil transport fleet up for sale. About 210 employees will be let go, Sun spokesman Bud Davis said yesterday. The Philadelphia oil company has not yet found a buyer, but Davis said, "We're talking to people now, and we expect the sale to be sooner rather than later - we would hope by the end of the year. " The fleet consists of five tugs, seven barges, one self-propelled barge, one coastal tanker and two ocean-going tankers.
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NEWS
November 27, 2013
A RECENT National Public Radio report made much of financial troubles in the Philadelphia schools, and shortfalls of a few hundred million dollars. This is an economic problem that could be solved with a fraction of the money taken from the pockets of Philadelphia citizens by the high price of oil. The U.S. currently pays $94 each for 19 million barrels of crude oil every day. Under President Clinton, the price averaged $26 per barrel in today's dollars and the oil companies made good profits at that price.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Rawleigh Warner, 92, the Mobil Oil Corp. chairman and chief executive officer who took corporate-image management to a new level through company sponsorship of public TV's Masterpiece Theater and paid opinion pieces that appeared in U.S. newspapers, died Wednesday in Hobe Sound, Fla., of complications from a progressive muscle disease, a New York Times obituary said. As chairman and CEO from 1969 to 1986, and president from 1965 to 1969, the finance-minded Mr. Warner led Mobil, then based in New York, as it overtook rivals to become second in sales behind Exxon Corp., years before the two companies merged.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
By Robert L. Bradley Jr. Several of the country's most powerful environmental groups have latched onto the recent 10,000-barrel Arkansas oil spill to fight against a federal permit for Keystone XL, a proposed transnational pipeline project. New subway ads in Washington from SumOfUs.org claim that this spill is just a "preview" of what will come by connecting Canadian oil deposits with refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast. This now-standard tactic among green groups - opposing new energy projects by highlighting dissimilar accidents - is obstructionist thinking.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter Joseph Lufkin Jr., 95, a longtime Abington resident and an Atlantic Richfield Co. employee for three decades, died Wednesday, Dec. 19, of cerebrovascular disease at Rydal Park in Jenkintown. Mr. Lufkin joined the Atlantic Refining Co. in 1945. His responsibilities included the field of industrial engineering, which was new at the time, and later, implementation of information technology. In the 1970s, he retired from Atlantic Richfield Co., now part of British Petroleum, with the title systems implementation manager.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) is suing officials in West Deptford, his hometown, alleging that they let two oil companies skirt an environmental cleanup law in exchange for money to buy two fire trucks. The lawsuit, filed in Superior Court in Gloucester County, argues that the mayor and township council "willfully ignored" a law designed to prevent companies from leaving a polluted site without first paying the state for environmental cleanup. In a June e-mail exchange, a lawyer for Sunoco pledged that the oil company would pay $1 million toward West Deptford's purchase of two fire engines if the township awarded it $13.9 million for a property tax settlement and withheld nothing for cleanup in accordance with the pending law, according to the lawsuit.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - The next archbishop of Canterbury will be officially introduced Friday, the British government says, and the expectation is that the new leader of the world's 77 million Anglicans will be former oil company executive Justin Welby. Welby, 56, made an unusual midcareer shift from the oil industry to the clergy. He has said he faced conflicts between his beliefs and how companies acted - and has made business ethics and standards part of his work. "I don't believe in good human beings," Welby said in an interview with the Guardian in July.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
"My first reaction was, ‘Wow, they're thinking outside the box.'?" — C. Alan Walker, an aide to Gov. Corbett, on Delta Air Lines' purchase of the ConocoPhillips refinery in Trainer, where the carrier intends to make its own jet fuel. "Acquiring the Trainer refinery is an innovative approach to managing our largest expense. " — Delta chief executive Richard Anderson, on the $150 million purchase. "They're really going to have to prove that they can start to monetize these 900 million users, not just in a desktop environment, but more importantly in a mobile environment, which is even more questionable.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 15,000 jobs could be affected - in some instances eliminated - by the closings of oil refineries in Marcus Hook and Trainer, Delaware County officials warned Wednesday. "This is a real devastating situation," said Frank Carey of the county's Office of Employment and Training. Citing a state analysis it had requested, the county said that for every job lost at the refinery, 18 nonrefinery employees would either lose jobs, have hours reduced, or have their jobs changed in some way. Those who would be out of work included more than 1,100 union members employed by refinery contractors, according to the study.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc. and ConocoPhillips are shopping their Delaware River refineries to a small group of potential buyers who might keep them open, saving about a thousand threatened jobs. But elected officials and labor leaders who met Monday with representatives of the oil companies expressed frustration that they know little more about the seriousness or intentions of the buyers. "They're precluded from telling us what may be going on at this time," U.S. Rep. Pat Meehan (R., Pa.)
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