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Oil Consumption

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NEWS
February 15, 2006 | Sheth Jones
I agree that the President's call for energy independence was short on details and calls for personal sacrifice. However, it is silly to insist that the key to significant fuel savings is to raise federal corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards. Escalating gas prices force automakers to develop more fuel-efficient vehicles without government intervention. Many people are quick to blame America's appetite for oil on the automakers, but that is like saying a drug dealer forces an addict to use his products.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
How much oil should a well-functioning auto engine consume? And how much trouble should the owner of a new vehicle just have to accept? Those are two of the questions raised by the story of Dave Prelle and his wife, Donna Sarli-Prelle, of Clementon, N.J., who are unhappy owners of a 2010 Chevy Equinox. The Prelles bought the Equinox, which General Motors describes as a "fuel-efficient crossover SUV," for about $29,000 in August 2009. Dave Prelle, an equipment operator at International Paper, planned to keep it for a long time.
NEWS
November 9, 2007 | By Tom Mast
The supplies to feed America's voracious appetite for oil continue to tighten, and we have not yet done anything effective to reduce our dependence on this commodity that is so vital to our economy. What is the U.S. position in the world oil scene? Even though the United States has only 2.4 percent of the world's oil reserves, it uses about 25 percent of all oil consumed. The United States uses about 21 million barrels per day of oil. Of this, it imports 12.5 million, or more than 60 percent.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Question: I am the original owner of a 1991 Chevy 1500 pickup. It has 105,000 miles on it, and looks and runs great. The problem is the engine is using a quart of oil every 300 miles. The engine is a 305 [a 305-cubic-inch V-8] with a carburetor. Do you think having the heads redone will solve the problem, or does the engine have to be replaced? Answer: There are three principal sources of oil consumption: worn piston rings, worn valve guides, or leaks. I would check first for leaks, notably the valve cover gaskets and the back of the engine where the bell housing bolts to the transmission.
NEWS
July 27, 2005 | By Froma Harrop
It is oil's fault. The London bombings are almost surely al-Qaeda's work, which means oil paid for them. Oil keeps the Mideast backward. It funds the madrassas that fill heads with anti-West poison. And it pays the terrorists who plant bombs on European trains and drive airplanes into American buildings. It is time we did something about oil. The United States accounts for 25 percent of the world's oil consumption. We could crush oil's power to hurt us with a serious campaign to kick our fossil-fuel habit.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2005 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Consumer preferences for higher-mileage vehicles may slow oil and gasoline demand in coming years and lessen the urgency to build significant numbers of refineries in the United States, Shell Oil Co. president John Hofmeister said yesterday. Hofmeister made his comments as the House passed legislation to boost refining. He told Knight Ridder that efforts by President Bush and Congress to provide incentives to build refineries are welcome, but a key assumption - that the demand for gasoline would continue to increase - might be flawed.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By James Phillips
The tragic May 17 attack on the USS Stark has led some Americans to question the necessity of a continued U.S. military presence in the Persian Gulf. They would have us renege on our commitment to escort 11 Kuwaiti oil tankers or withdraw from the gulf altogether. Such shortsighted thinking ignores the grave risks of a U.S. pullback. If the United States cuts and runs, Iran will only be encouraged to expand its war against Iraq to the Arab side of the gulf. This could trigger another oil crisis that would severely damage Western economies.
NEWS
April 15, 2002
More creativity flowed out of West Philadelphia than Washington last week on how to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil. At the Capitol, the Senate slogged through week four of largely unproductive debate on energy policy. Here, the Greater Philadelphia Clean Cities Program showcased innovative alternative-fuel vehicles, demonstrating how new technologies could reduce U.S. oil consumption. On display at the West Philadelphia Automotive Academy on Thursday was an orange electric Saturn built by 15 students guided by math teacher Simon Hauger.
NEWS
November 25, 2001
For years, rigorous environmental protection has been opposed on the false premise that the country has to choose between a strong economy and a clean environment. In a new twist, environmentalism is now deemed unpatriotic. By necessity since Sept. 11, resources of government agencies have been shifted from environmental enforcement to national security. The U.S. Coast Guard, for example, is more focused on guarding the shore from terrorists than protecting fisheries from poachers.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Question: I have been told that the use of premium unleaded gasoline in police cars, which spend a great deal of time at idle, reduces carbon buildup in the engine. Is this true of late-model police cars, like the Ford Crown Victoria, that are designed to run on regular gas? Answer: It's not true of cars of any age, because premium fuel doesn't deter carbon buildup any more than regular fuel does. Indeed, the only time using premium fuel is a good idea is when your engine has been designed to run on it. Otherwise, it's a waste of money.
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NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Josh Lederman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - It's a decision President Obama put off during the 2012 campaign, but now that he has won a second term, his next move on a proposed oil pipeline between the United States and Canada may signal how he will deal with climate and energy issues in the four years ahead. Obama is facing increasing pressure to determine the fate of the $7 billion Keystone XL project, with environmental activists and oil producers each holding out hope that the president, freed from the political constraints of reelection, will side with them on this and countless other related issues down the road.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012
IN THE REGION ING to become Capital One 360 Capital One Financial Corp. , the lender that completed the purchase of ING Groep NV 's Wilmington-based online bank in February, said it rebranded the business "Capital One 360. " The new name will go into effect in February 2013, according to a notice sent to customers. ING's orange-ball logo will be replaced by a design incorporating the name Capital One 360, the McLean, Va.-based company said. - Bloomberg News Whole Foods to relocate a market The Whole Foods Market next to the Barnes Foundation near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has signed a lease to relocate to a new location near its existing store at 20th and Callowhill Streets by 2017, the company announced.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
How much oil should a well-functioning auto engine consume? And how much trouble should the owner of a new vehicle just have to accept? Those are two of the questions raised by the story of Dave Prelle and his wife, Donna Sarli-Prelle, of Clementon, N.J., who are unhappy owners of a 2010 Chevy Equinox. The Prelles bought the Equinox, which General Motors describes as a "fuel-efficient crossover SUV," for about $29,000 in August 2009. Dave Prelle, an equipment operator at International Paper, planned to keep it for a long time.
NEWS
May 11, 2008
The common good In defining the enemy of freedom and democracy as Islamic fascism, Rick Santorum cites Islamic scholars and religious leaders who said, "One cannot mix Islamic law (sharia) and democracy because sharia is from God . . . " and "Substituting man-made laws for God-given laws is a grave offense" ("Let's call this 'terrorism' by its real name," May 8). We have often heard this same pronouncement (in varying formulations) from Protestant fundamentalist Christians who seek laws based on the Bible; from Roman Catholics who seek laws based on faith and morals as stated by the pope; and by Jews who seek to settle on certain land because the Torah tells them their ancestors once lived there.
NEWS
November 9, 2007 | By Tom Mast
The supplies to feed America's voracious appetite for oil continue to tighten, and we have not yet done anything effective to reduce our dependence on this commodity that is so vital to our economy. What is the U.S. position in the world oil scene? Even though the United States has only 2.4 percent of the world's oil reserves, it uses about 25 percent of all oil consumed. The United States uses about 21 million barrels per day of oil. Of this, it imports 12.5 million, or more than 60 percent.
NEWS
February 15, 2006 | Sheth Jones
I agree that the President's call for energy independence was short on details and calls for personal sacrifice. However, it is silly to insist that the key to significant fuel savings is to raise federal corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards. Escalating gas prices force automakers to develop more fuel-efficient vehicles without government intervention. Many people are quick to blame America's appetite for oil on the automakers, but that is like saying a drug dealer forces an addict to use his products.
NEWS
February 4, 2006
The President offered up the American Competitiveness Initiative, which addresses education in our country and yet continues to overlook a significant problem. The President said he would like to increase and improve math and science education. I support this. However, as an English teacher, I feel that the humanities are increasingly overlooked in terms of social significance and funding. A strong background in the humanities for all Americans is imperative. Learning how to think critically, process complex ideas, and then communicate those ideas to others are skills that are key to individuals who work in both the sciences and humanities.
NEWS
October 18, 2005 | By Nathan Willcox
As the fallout from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita ratchets up what were already high gas prices, energy prices are once again making the news. And while most news stories have focused on the pain felt by Pennsylvanians at the pump, it's no secret that the state's business community stands to take quite a hit from today's high gas prices as well. The good news is that we can turn things around - if we recognize our energy problems for what they are and work together to solve them.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2005 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Consumer preferences for higher-mileage vehicles may slow oil and gasoline demand in coming years and lessen the urgency to build significant numbers of refineries in the United States, Shell Oil Co. president John Hofmeister said yesterday. Hofmeister made his comments as the House passed legislation to boost refining. He told Knight Ridder that efforts by President Bush and Congress to provide incentives to build refineries are welcome, but a key assumption - that the demand for gasoline would continue to increase - might be flawed.
NEWS
July 27, 2005 | By Froma Harrop
It is oil's fault. The London bombings are almost surely al-Qaeda's work, which means oil paid for them. Oil keeps the Mideast backward. It funds the madrassas that fill heads with anti-West poison. And it pays the terrorists who plant bombs on European trains and drive airplanes into American buildings. It is time we did something about oil. The United States accounts for 25 percent of the world's oil consumption. We could crush oil's power to hurt us with a serious campaign to kick our fossil-fuel habit.
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