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Oil Spill

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NEWS
June 20, 2010 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
On a recent airplane flight, I realized a way I'm different from other people. The men in the seats behind me spent the entire three hours talking about their ideas to stop the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Me, I'm not smart enough to stop the oil spill. But before we go further, let me be clear. I'm sad about the oil spill, and I'm furious about it, and I don't think it's a laughing matter. I'm not making fun of it. Honestly, I spend a lot of time thinking about how awful it is, and I read everything I can, because I'm interested.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By John Enders, Associated Press
Two years after the Exxon Valdez ran aground and caused the nation's worst oil spill, crews are preparing for what they hope will be the final season of cleanup work along Alaska's still-soiled shoreline. Exxon has contended that Alaska's shores are clean, but an unknown number of miles of shoreline remain soiled, and in some places black goo continues to seep back into the water. To find out how serious the problem still is, survey crews have targeted for inspection next month 575 miles of "problem" shoreline that various agencies identified over the winter.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | By Douglas Jehl, Los Angeles Times Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Under pressure from the state of Alaska, the Bush administration moved yesterday to assume more control over the massive Alaskan oil-spill cleanup, increasing Coast Guard authority in the effort and preparing to dispatch soldiers to cleanse beaches and wildlife. The new Coast Guard role, disclosed by Commandant Adm. Paul A. Yost Jr., will allow the guard essentially to direct the cleanup but leaves Exxon Corp. nominally in charge of the operation and responsible for the $1 million-a-day costs.
NEWS
July 17, 2011
Oil-spill cleanup yields treasures CAMINADA HEADLAND, La. - Cleanup after the BP oil spill has turned up dozens of sites where archaeologists are finding human and animal bones, pottery, and primitive weapons left behind by prehistoric Indian settlements - a trove of new clues about the Gulf Coast's mound dwellers more than 1,300 years ago. But experts also fear the remains could be damaged by oil or lost to erosion before they can be fully studied....
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, the likelihood of any oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico reaching New Jersey's shores is remote. But the state isn't taking any chances. On Tuesday, Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin announced the formation of a "gulf spill team" to monitor the situation daily, create a scientific model of how the oil could reach New Jersey, and, in case it does, develop a plan of action. The move was met with both praise from environmental groups that fear the worst and derision from a critic who said that given the agency's limited funds and staff, it had far more important environmental matters to tend to. "Right now, we are optimistic the oil will not reach New Jersey and will not affect fishing nor the summer beach season," Martin said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So far, the likelihood of any oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico reaching New Jersey's shores is remote. But the state isn't taking any chances. On Tuesday, Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin announced the formation of a "gulf spill team" to monitor the situation daily, create a scientific model of how the oil could reach New Jersey, and, in case it does, develop a plan of action. The move was met with both praise from environmental groups that fear the worst and derision from a critic who said that given the agency's limited funds and staff, it had far more important environmental matters to tend to. "Right now, we are optimistic the oil will not reach New Jersey and will not affect fishing nor the summer beach season," Martin said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | By Steven Thomma and Juan O. Tamayo, Inquirer Gulf Staff Reuters and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Saudi Arabian crews moved plastic curtains into the water to shield desalination plants from the massive oil slick rolling over the Persian Gulf. Although Saudi officials said yesterday that their drinking water would be safe, more than a few unknowns made that a murky assessment. "We don't yet know what (Iraqi President) Saddam Hussein will do next," said Richard Golob, a Boston-based oil spill consultant. "This is just one of several environmental cards in his deck. " In order to stem the flow, the allies yesterday bombed Kuwaiti oil taps allegedly opened by Iraq.
NEWS
June 10, 2010
By Grant Calder My students generally enjoy discussing current events, but they are noticeably subdued when talk turns to the expanding pool of oil in the Gulf. They want to forget about it - not because they don't care, but because they do. They feel helpless in the face of the immensity of the slick and the inability of BP and the U.S. government to deal with it. What can we do? For a start, let's name it. In the first few weeks after the oil started to flow, we got used to hearing it referred to as a "leak.
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Coast Guard officials today were hoping to limit the damage caused by the spill yesterday of more than 200,000 gallons of crude oil into the Delaware River near Paulsboro, N.J. The spill was discovered at about 2:40 p.m. when a leak was found in a tanker docked at the Mobil Oil Co. refinery across from Philadelphia. Officials called it a major spill, but its immediate impact wasn't known. "The (containment) booms have been set around the vessel and the spill has been contained," said Coast Guard Petty Officer Randy Midgett.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A Soviet oil-skimming ship sent with great fanfare to help contain the Alaskan oil spill has been beaten back by stormy seas and slowed by its own technical shortcomings, the U.S. Coast Guard said yesterday. "To date, it's not been very successful," Coast Guard Capt. Glen Haines told a public meeting on Exxon Corp.'s progress in handling the worst oil spill in U.S. history. In four days, the 435-foot Vaydagubski, the world's largest oil-skimming vessel, has managed to collect only a small amount of oil. Haines said that the ship was unable to pump aboard what little oil it did round up with floating booms and that Coast Guard vessels had to draw off that oil instead.
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NEWS
February 7, 2016
The Schuylkill River Trail reopened from Chestnut to Locust Streets earlier this week as the water portion of a diesel-fuel spill cleanup has concluded, authorities said Friday. U.S. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Nick Ameen said 1,300 gallons of oil were vacuumed up from the Schuylkill. He said some oil was also cleaned up by "absorbent pads" and "booms" in the river, but that amount is hard to quantify. Cleanup efforts are now shifting to the land, particularly from the source of the oil spill, a generator at 2400 Market Street, to the area by the CSX railroad tracks.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
About 200 gallons of home heating oil spilled into the Schuylkill Monday morning, resulting in the closure of the river trail in Philadelphia between Market and Locust Streets, officials said. A total of 4,200 gallons of oil spilled sometime before 9:30 a.m. from a tank at 2400 Market St., crossing CSX property and the Schuylkill River Trail before partially draining into the river, officials said. The popular trail was closed in the area as the spill was assessed and then the cleanup began, the state Department of Environmental Protection reported.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A trash truck leaked oil over more than 2 miles of wet roadway in Delaware County, resulting in two accidents and a major traffic mess Wednesday morning, officials said. Sarah Jane White, 78, of Media, suffered minor injuries after she drove through the oil on Glen Riddle Road in Middletown Township and lost control of her car, which then hit a tree near the intersection with Wrights Lane around 10 a.m. She was taken to Riddle Hospital. A state trooper heading to the accident scene was involved in a minor accident less than a mile away at the intersection of Glen Riddle Road and Route 452. The oil spill, caused by a mechanical malfunction of a Laxton Enterprises Trash Removal truck, spanned from Baltimore Pike to Route 452, state police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2015 | Howard Gensler, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
TORONTO - Canadian journalist Naomi Klein became an important commenter on the world scene with her 2007 book, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism . Her latest book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate , talks about the overhaul needed to our economic system if we want to save our land, water and food from destruction. It's a controversial approach, especially here in the U.S., where a very loud faction of the political class does not even believe that climate change is real.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Washington Township man who caused an oil spill into a lake and creek last year while emptying his pool was sentenced Monday to five years of probation, contingent on his completing 150 hours of community service, the New Jersey Attorney General's Office said. John Caldwell, 48, pleaded guilty in May after authorities charged him in connection with the June 29, 2014, spill that unleashed several thousand gallons of oil into Spring Lake and Mantua Creek. Authorities said Caldwell, then a truck operator for an environmental services firm, used a vacuum truck to drain the water from his pool and dumped it in front of his home on Uranus Road.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tougher inspection and maintenance standards for railroad tracks could prevent dangerous derailments of trains carrying explosive crude oil, officials of the rail inspectors' union say. Lawmakers in Congress and rail regulators have focused much of their attention on the strength of oil tank cars and the volatility of Bakken crude oil, but track flaws and train speed can also be significant factors in accidents. "Let's see what we can do to keep the damn trains on the track," said Rick Inclima, a member of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA)
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Coast Guard is investigating an oil spill on the Delaware River near Pennsville, Salem County, N.J., authorities said Tuesday. Authorities were notified after globs of oil began washing ashore at the Pennsville boat ramp near Riviera Drive and Eaton Road. Police reports said there was a strong odor of oil. Neither the source of the oil nor the amount possibly spilled have been determined, said John Hammond, an operations specialist first class with the Coast Guard in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As a federal judge determines how many billions BP should pay for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Obama administration is pushing a troubling plan to allow drilling in the Atlantic Ocean off the East Coast from Virginia to Georgia. Environmentalists say President Obama is suffering from "oil spill amnesia," and the oil companies no doubt hope the American public is suffering a memory lapse, too. Obama withdrew an offshore drilling plan in 2010, shortly after BP's oil rig exploded, killing 11 people and spewing 200 million gallons of crude into the Gulf of Mexico over 87 days.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. says it has recovered 2,550 barrels of crude oil that spilled into a Louisiana bayou last week from its Mid-Valley Pipeline. The pipeline remains out of service indefinitely until repairs can be done. The Philadelphia company estimated last week that as much as 4,000 barrels - 168,000 gallons - spilled from a break in the underground pipeline. The Mid-Valley system, which transports crude oil from Texas to Midwestern refineries, terminates near Detroit.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A spill of about 1,000 gallons of crude oil into the Delaware River near Trainer, Delaware County, was largely cleaned up Tuesday, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection. The spill happened about 1 p.m. Monday when a pipe burst in the marine off-loading area at the Monroe Energy L.L.C. refinery, just south of the Commodore Barry Bridge. The majority of the oil is gone, said DEP spokeswoman Deborah Fries. "What is remaining is sheen. " She said the cold weather helped response workers do their job. Cold oil has a higher viscosity, which made it easier to collect and contain, she said.
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