CollectionsOil Spill
IN THE NEWS

Oil Spill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 20, 2010 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
On a recent airplane flight, I realized a way I'm different from other people. The men in the seats behind me spent the entire three hours talking about their ideas to stop the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Me, I'm not smart enough to stop the oil spill. But before we go further, let me be clear. I'm sad about the oil spill, and I'm furious about it, and I don't think it's a laughing matter. I'm not making fun of it. Honestly, I spend a lot of time thinking about how awful it is, and I read everything I can, because I'm interested.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By John Enders, Associated Press
Two years after the Exxon Valdez ran aground and caused the nation's worst oil spill, crews are preparing for what they hope will be the final season of cleanup work along Alaska's still-soiled shoreline. Exxon has contended that Alaska's shores are clean, but an unknown number of miles of shoreline remain soiled, and in some places black goo continues to seep back into the water. To find out how serious the problem still is, survey crews have targeted for inspection next month 575 miles of "problem" shoreline that various agencies identified over the winter.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | By Douglas Jehl, Los Angeles Times Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Under pressure from the state of Alaska, the Bush administration moved yesterday to assume more control over the massive Alaskan oil-spill cleanup, increasing Coast Guard authority in the effort and preparing to dispatch soldiers to cleanse beaches and wildlife. The new Coast Guard role, disclosed by Commandant Adm. Paul A. Yost Jr., will allow the guard essentially to direct the cleanup but leaves Exxon Corp. nominally in charge of the operation and responsible for the $1 million-a-day costs.
NEWS
July 17, 2011
Oil-spill cleanup yields treasures CAMINADA HEADLAND, La. - Cleanup after the BP oil spill has turned up dozens of sites where archaeologists are finding human and animal bones, pottery, and primitive weapons left behind by prehistoric Indian settlements - a trove of new clues about the Gulf Coast's mound dwellers more than 1,300 years ago. But experts also fear the remains could be damaged by oil or lost to erosion before they can be fully studied....
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, the likelihood of any oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico reaching New Jersey's shores is remote. But the state isn't taking any chances. On Tuesday, Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin announced the formation of a "gulf spill team" to monitor the situation daily, create a scientific model of how the oil could reach New Jersey, and, in case it does, develop a plan of action. The move was met with both praise from environmental groups that fear the worst and derision from a critic who said that given the agency's limited funds and staff, it had far more important environmental matters to tend to. "Right now, we are optimistic the oil will not reach New Jersey and will not affect fishing nor the summer beach season," Martin said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So far, the likelihood of any oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico reaching New Jersey's shores is remote. But the state isn't taking any chances. On Tuesday, Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin announced the formation of a "gulf spill team" to monitor the situation daily, create a scientific model of how the oil could reach New Jersey, and, in case it does, develop a plan of action. The move was met with both praise from environmental groups that fear the worst and derision from a critic who said that given the agency's limited funds and staff, it had far more important environmental matters to tend to. "Right now, we are optimistic the oil will not reach New Jersey and will not affect fishing nor the summer beach season," Martin said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | By Steven Thomma and Juan O. Tamayo, Inquirer Gulf Staff Reuters and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Saudi Arabian crews moved plastic curtains into the water to shield desalination plants from the massive oil slick rolling over the Persian Gulf. Although Saudi officials said yesterday that their drinking water would be safe, more than a few unknowns made that a murky assessment. "We don't yet know what (Iraqi President) Saddam Hussein will do next," said Richard Golob, a Boston-based oil spill consultant. "This is just one of several environmental cards in his deck. " In order to stem the flow, the allies yesterday bombed Kuwaiti oil taps allegedly opened by Iraq.
NEWS
June 10, 2010
By Grant Calder My students generally enjoy discussing current events, but they are noticeably subdued when talk turns to the expanding pool of oil in the Gulf. They want to forget about it - not because they don't care, but because they do. They feel helpless in the face of the immensity of the slick and the inability of BP and the U.S. government to deal with it. What can we do? For a start, let's name it. In the first few weeks after the oil started to flow, we got used to hearing it referred to as a "leak.
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Coast Guard officials today were hoping to limit the damage caused by the spill yesterday of more than 200,000 gallons of crude oil into the Delaware River near Paulsboro, N.J. The spill was discovered at about 2:40 p.m. when a leak was found in a tanker docked at the Mobil Oil Co. refinery across from Philadelphia. Officials called it a major spill, but its immediate impact wasn't known. "The (containment) booms have been set around the vessel and the spill has been contained," said Coast Guard Petty Officer Randy Midgett.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A Soviet oil-skimming ship sent with great fanfare to help contain the Alaskan oil spill has been beaten back by stormy seas and slowed by its own technical shortcomings, the U.S. Coast Guard said yesterday. "To date, it's not been very successful," Coast Guard Capt. Glen Haines told a public meeting on Exxon Corp.'s progress in handling the worst oil spill in U.S. history. In four days, the 435-foot Vaydagubski, the world's largest oil-skimming vessel, has managed to collect only a small amount of oil. Haines said that the ship was unable to pump aboard what little oil it did round up with floating booms and that Coast Guard vessels had to draw off that oil instead.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 27, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tougher inspection and maintenance standards for railroad tracks could prevent dangerous derailments of trains carrying explosive crude oil, officials of the rail inspectors' union say. Lawmakers in Congress and rail regulators have focused much of their attention on the strength of oil tank cars and the volatility of Bakken crude oil, but track flaws and train speed can also be significant factors in accidents. "Let's see what we can do to keep the damn trains on the track," said Rick Inclima, a member of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA)
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Coast Guard is investigating an oil spill on the Delaware River near Pennsville, Salem County, N.J., authorities said Tuesday. Authorities were notified after globs of oil began washing ashore at the Pennsville boat ramp near Riviera Drive and Eaton Road. Police reports said there was a strong odor of oil. Neither the source of the oil nor the amount possibly spilled have been determined, said John Hammond, an operations specialist first class with the Coast Guard in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As a federal judge determines how many billions BP should pay for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Obama administration is pushing a troubling plan to allow drilling in the Atlantic Ocean off the East Coast from Virginia to Georgia. Environmentalists say President Obama is suffering from "oil spill amnesia," and the oil companies no doubt hope the American public is suffering a memory lapse, too. Obama withdrew an offshore drilling plan in 2010, shortly after BP's oil rig exploded, killing 11 people and spewing 200 million gallons of crude into the Gulf of Mexico over 87 days.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. says it has recovered 2,550 barrels of crude oil that spilled into a Louisiana bayou last week from its Mid-Valley Pipeline. The pipeline remains out of service indefinitely until repairs can be done. The Philadelphia company estimated last week that as much as 4,000 barrels - 168,000 gallons - spilled from a break in the underground pipeline. The Mid-Valley system, which transports crude oil from Texas to Midwestern refineries, terminates near Detroit.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A spill of about 1,000 gallons of crude oil into the Delaware River near Trainer, Delaware County, was largely cleaned up Tuesday, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection. The spill happened about 1 p.m. Monday when a pipe burst in the marine off-loading area at the Monroe Energy L.L.C. refinery, just south of the Commodore Barry Bridge. The majority of the oil is gone, said DEP spokeswoman Deborah Fries. "What is remaining is sheen. " She said the cold weather helped response workers do their job. Cold oil has a higher viscosity, which made it easier to collect and contain, she said.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Steven Mufson, Washington Post
The oil services company Halliburton agreed Thursday to plead guilty to destroying evidence during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in 2010, admitting one count of criminal conduct and agreeing to pay the $200,000 maximum statutory fine, according to the Justice Department. In a startling turn in the three-year-old criminal investigation, Halliburton said that on two occasions during the oil spill, it directed employees to destroy or "get rid of" simulations that would have helped clarify how to assign blame for the blowout - and possibly focused more attention on Halliburton's role.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Immigration votes are set WASHINGTON - Senators prepared Monday for the first votes in the full Senate on a landmark immigration bill, readying amendments on contentious issues including border security, back taxes, and health-care coverage. The two votes scheduled for Tuesday are on procedural measures to officially allow debate to move forward on the measure to remake the nation's immigration laws and offer eventual citizenship to some 11 million people here illegally. Both votes are expected to pass easily.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Michael Kunzelman, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - BP bears most of the blame for the disastrous 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico because it cut corners and put profit ahead of safety, a U.S. Justice Department attorney charged Monday at the opening of a high-stakes trial that could result in the oil company and its partners being forced to pay billions more in damages. The London-based oil giant acknowledged that it made "errors in judgment" before the deadly blowout, but it also cast blame on the owner of the drilling rig and the contractor involved in cementing the well.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012
"The president brought up that he hadn't always had the best relationship with business, and he didn't think he deserved that, but he understood that's where things were and wanted it to be better. " - David M. Cote, CEO, Honeywell, after a meeting of business executives with President Obama at the White House. "Choices made by Jon Corzine during his tenure as chairman and CEO sealed MF Global's fate. " - Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R., Texas) on results of congressional oversight panel on the fall of MF Global.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|